Legend/KEY to deck plans


Damian2104

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On F deck at boiler room no. 4 there are crew members, including hebrew cook and scandinavian int. You may know what the abbreviation "int." ? I read on the internet about Hebrew cook. I found a fairly extensive article. Unfortunately, I did not find any information about the second.
 

TimTurner

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It's a little odd, because most of the crew berthing there are cooks, but I suspect that's the Scandinavian Interpreter.
 

Damian2104

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Thanks. Maybe. On board E between hatches 5 and 6 is also there interpreter.
I thought he was the only interpreter on the ship.
 

Damian2104

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So I remembered now the question regarding the deck E. Looking through the plans of the ship I learned a lot of interesting things about the people and functions they performed on the ship. I found a lot on this subject on the Internet. I couldn't find one job. Do you know who it was "Plate Nan"? The cabin is located on the port side near reciprocating engine casing.
 

TimTurner

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I think there were 5 or 6. I'm not sure. Also, these bunks are "normally assigned", not where people actually stayed. Charles Joughin, the chief baker, actually moved to the Confectioner's room because it was a nicer room. So just because it's labeled "Scandinavian interpreter" doesn't mean that that's where he slept, or even that there was one on board.
 

TimTurner

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No, I don't know what the Plate Nan is. It's obviously something to do with the food service. It could be someone who stores and retrieves the dishware requested by the chef, or the one who warms up the plates, or virtually anything. They seem to have an assistant, and they aren't the dishwasher (which is aft, just forward and port of the 2nd class stairway on E Deck).

They're next to the chef and head waiters, so I'd guess they were higher up and may have interacted with the 1st class customers.
 

Damian2104

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I suspected that it could be someone related to plates. I can't find just the name for this profession. Next to Plate Nan is the Controller. I also had a problem with it. I assumed it was a food controller. I don't know if I'm right. I thought the chef would do such things.
 

TimTurner

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The Controller is in a very nice cabin (exterior window, large desk) with the two head waiters, right next to the Chef's quarters. I don't know, but I'd guess the Controller was the leading Head Waiter. They were probably totally responsible for the 1st class dinning room venue (where the Chef was his superior).

It's possible that there was a 1st, 2nd, and 3rd class Head Waiter, or it is possible that there was a head waiter for the 1st class Restaurant and another for the 1st class saloon, and possibly the Controller supervised them both.
 

Damian2104

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If not for your and other people's statements in this forum, I probably would never have learned so many interesting things about the Titanic. Unfortunately, Polish Titanic websites have limited information. I learned a lot more from English articles. I see that your knowledge of the ship is great so maybe you could tell me one more topic. On deck E are "Portable plate for shipping furnaces". On Orlop Deck there is also "Portable plate for shipping armatures" What did they serve? I wanted to learn something more because I am very interested in the function of this disc but I could not find anything.
 

TimTurner

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Thank you. I've lurked on this forum for several years and learned a thing or two. I'm currently building my 3rd model of the Titanic, so I've picked up a lot about her layout.

The key to the portable deckplates is what's below them. The portable deckplates on E deck are in Scotland Road. Heavy equipment can be brought into the ship by the large portside door near the Engine Room, and down Scotland Road on E Deck to the portable deckplate. The deckplate is removed and the equipment can be lowered down into the boiler room below. Each boiler room has one. The Engineroom has a side door that lines up with the portside door. The deckplate in the Orlop deck is over the generator room. It leads up into a corridor which connects to the Number 4 port and starboard hatches. These hatches allow food to be brought into the food stores, and also electrical parts to the generators.

These deckplates would be used move large replacement parts in and out for repairs or upgrades. Most ships have to consider stuff like that, but you don't think about it on a day to day basis.

Here's a picture of the portable hatch (In green) from below in my latest model. Each square is 6 inches (15cm). This view is in Boiler Room 5 casing, the level of F Deck, standing on top of the coal bunkers. We're actually standing next to the two H.F.W. Tanks we were talking about the other day (offscreen). The dark/black color is the smoke risers from the boilers. The tan color is my version of the steam piping comming up from the boilers (a bit too large). Red down below is the wall of the boiler room. We're looking aft. Through the wall to our right is the ship's laundry (port side). The gray roof above is the bottom of Scotland Road up on E Deck. I haven't put any catwalks in yet.

So replacement parts could be lowered down that portable deckplate into here:
1589968420260.png
 
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Damian2104

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Wow. I didn't expect such a comprehensive answer;) You told me everything I wanted to know. This is perfectly seen on your model. I did not think that these plates were used to move goods to lower decks. This your model is great. At the beginning, when you mentioned the model, I thought it was a wooden or plastic model. And you are building a 3D model. Nice, because you will be able to look even in the furthest corners of the Titanic. I guess you have a lot of work ahead of you. But probably also fun work. What happened to previous models?
 

Damian2104

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Ok. I will look for sure. I have 2 more questions about plans. This is probably the last because I already know everything. You have dispelled a lot of my doubts so maybe you can help me now.
1. on deck D, next to 2 class dining saloon, there is a store hoist mach. Were they spare winches, parts for them or something else.
2. sidelights with shutters & plugs are placed on deck F on board. Why were there shutters and plugs on the portholes. And what was "single guard rods"?
 

TimTurner

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1. It was probably the mechanism that powered the hoist - not a spare but the actual machinery installed and operational. Probably a few cables ran over the bit of stairs you see there to the hoist which goes down to the stores. It was probably pretty big because it wasn't hoisting 3 or 4 passengers, but of tons of food for nearly 3500 people 3 meals a day. I'd bet an elevator like that was rated for 4-5 tons at least.
2. I don't really know. The "sidelights" are portholes. They're ventilating, which I'm fairly certain means that they open. Utley is the designer or manufacturer. The shutters are probably just normal shutters the passengers can use to keep the room dark by covering the porthole. I don't know what the plugs are. If you can research an Utley porthole you may find out. Some of this forum's sailors may know. Its possible the "plugs" are the glass in the porthole.

The single guard rods are a mystery. The P&S means port & starboard. Based on the diagram, they could be part of the windows, or totally unrelated. My gut instinct is that those portholes had something like a single vertical bar on the outside to help protect the windows in case of collision with floating debris in a storm etc. The ones I see are facing forward, so that would make sense.
 

Damian2104

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Ok. Thank you for your answer. I will try to look for these portholes somewhere on the Internet. For now, everything is clear to me. But maybe I will have some more questions so I can speak again.
 

Damian2104

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Welcome back. I need help again.
1. On the F deck there is a 3rd class galley. There are the abbreviations "OV" and "WS". OV I guess it's an oven. I don't know what "WS" can mean.
2. Do you know what "Deck dropped 18" from frame 21 to 60 "means? This inscription is on the portholes.
 

TimTurner

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2. It's not actually on the portholes, its just marked there. Frames are basically the ribs of the hull. On Titanic, it starts at the middle and works its way forward and aft. They look like they're 2 or 3 feet apart. You can see them if you look at the centerline of the ship. Look at the base of the Grand Staircase on F Deck. You'll see that it's between Frames 36 (Forward) and 40 (Forward). The frame numbers are there. It's important to know that there's also a frame 36 Aft (In the middle of the engine room). So on F deck (also G deck - 12 inches), it looks like that entire section of the deck has been lowered 18" (eighteen inches), from the port side to the starboard side. I'm not sure why, but probably to give the pool and Turkish bath the extra ceiling height, which makes pretty solid sense. So the 3rd class dining room aft of the Baths, and 3rd class berthing forward had an 8 foot 6 inch ceiling, but the baths had a 10 foot ceiling. You can see this in the side view where the fan room aft of boiler casing 3-4 has an 8'6" ceiling, and the one forward has a 10 foot ceiling.
 

TimTurner

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1. I don't know. I don't see any pictures of the area on a quick Google. search

WS/OV could also be "WS Over", but overhead stuff usually has dashed lines, and if that's the case, there doesn't seem to be anything on the floor there.

It could also be Wine Service, but I think that wouldn't be in the Galley, even if they did serve wine in 3rd class. Wine would be in the pantry or bar or similar.

It could be Washing Station. I'd also guess that's a sink next to the bulkhead, so if it's "Washing Station", that's also a bit weird to have a tiny sink in the middle of the galley when you have a great big one on the side.

I might guess it's Oven and W Stove, but I don't have any idea what a W Stove might be. There's also two much larger ovens, and a huge stove range there, so it seems odd to have such a tiny oven and stove in what looks like a centrally located spot, blocking passage through the galley. Its centrally located, and right next to the main preparation table.

This galley is much smaller than the 1st/2nd class galley and fed a lot of people. Whatever they're doing in there is done in bulk on an industrial scale. That "WS/OV" looks about the size of, or smaller than, the average home oven. I'd guess it's something pretty small in a typical kitchen. Like a spice rack, or napkin holder. Whatever it was was designed to service 1000 3rd class passengers.
 

TimTurner

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It might also be "warming shelf oven". The food is cooked here, but it all has to move into the pantry, where it seems to be distributed either cafeteria style, or queues, or queues of waiters. I suspect a lot of food was stacked in the kitchen by the cooks until the pantry staff came to collect it and move it to the pantry. I suspect the dresser was for clean dishes, the food was put into the dishes, then perhaps placed on a warming shelf for a couple of minutes until the pantry staff came to get it. That would be a good location for that, centrally located in the kitchen, but near the doors.

It wouldn't need to be big, because it only needs to wait 3 or 4 minutes before the pantry boy comes back for the next cartload and the prepared food is actually stored in the pantry until a passenger comes to take it.

If its not some kind of warming shelf, then the dresser there likely served such a purpose.
 

Damian2104

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In fact :) Now it makes sense. I wouldn't think that between 21 and 60 ribs the deck is down. I have never read about it.
Yes, it can be a "warming shelf oven". From what you write is probably the most likely solution.
Do you still know what it was and what was the "Trimming hole" on deck G for? And why was there a paint store on the ship?
 

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