Legend/KEY to deck plans


TimTurner

Member
Dec 11, 2012
468
67
93
Paint is very common at sea. It protects metal surfaces from the salt and water in the air. There are special paints, like the anti-fouling paint used on the bottom to prevent barnacles from gripping the hull and slowing the ship down. Paint wears off. It gets dirty. Someone slams a hammer into a wall. A storm throws debris against the ship. Repair work scrapes the paint. I believe the coal scuttles were sealed using a kind of lead paint every time the ship refueled. We also know that after the bunker fire, they painted the bunker wall with some kind of grease or oil. That was possibly stored in the paint storeroom, too. On a ship like Titanic, they had a whole room for it.

Trimmer holes: There are hatches on the side of the ship on F deck. These lead to the coal scuttles (marked "CS" on the plans) which are about 3 feet wide. Coal was loaded into these hatches and fell down the scuttles into an area on G deck above the coal bunkers. I think those areas are called "coalling galleries". When loading coal, the trimmers could move the coal around the coalling gallery and drop it through the "Trimmer holes" down into the coal bunker below.
 

Damian2104

Member
Apr 9, 2020
35
0
26
I read somewhere about the fact that fireman painted the wall of the boiler room after the fire. I could guess that they had to store such paint somewhere.
On the F and G decks next to the chain locker there is a "stringer bare steel" and "stringer bare steel deck". Did they apply the same despite different descriptions? Were they reinforced walls for the chain locker or did they have any other task? Did they perform the same function as bare steel deck on F deck between boiler rooms?
 

TimTurner

Member
Dec 11, 2012
468
67
93
I don't know what purpose the floors in the chain locker serve other than reinforcing the sides of the hull. Im sure F and G decks are the same. I don't know why there were bare, since that's a corrosion hazard. Perhaps if the anchor chains constantly beat against the metal it would just scrape off the paint (and any rust, too!).

I don't know the origin of the word, or if it's related, but a stringer is the board running up the side of a staircase, supporting the whole stairs. This probably implies those decks were only there for support.

I don't know why other decks in the ship have bare steel. It's very un-seamanlike to have bare steel, so they must have not worried about it rusting. I'm not aware of anything there that would prevent rusting. I'd just about guarantee that one good run out of Titanic's anchor chain would strip the paint off anything it touched in the chain locker, though.
 

Damian2104

Member
Apr 9, 2020
35
0
26
So simply the deck was in this place also metal reinforced with a stringer. And between the side and the chain locker there was an empty space that was not allowed.
Maybe you know something about the room on board G - Brine ret. tank room? I searched in the Internet but found nothing.
 

TimTurner

Member
Dec 11, 2012
468
67
93
I think the deck was the stringer. It's just a big empty compartment with large steel decks on the sides. It isn't closed off in any way. The "empty space" is part of the chain locker. The extra deck just gives it structural support, and that's all it was designed to do.

I remember reading about it somewhere, but I don't recall the Brine Ret Tank's function. It's either Brine Return Tank (Probably this), or Brine Retention Tank. You'll notice there's a little ladder that goes down into the CO2 Evaporator room below on the Orlop Deck, and next to that is the Brine Pump Room. Google tells me a CO2 Evaporator is a refrigeration unit, which makes sense. It's reasonably close to all of the cold food storage rooms (The thick walls around those rooms are because there is chilled water in pipes running between the walls, probably with insulation). That all runs to the CO2 Evaporator, which functions like a standard refrigeration cycle. You can read up online how such a system works. Likely the Brine Ret Tank was at/above the waterline (same level as the condenser seawater discharge), likely because it's returning brine water to the sea.
 

Damian2104

Member
Apr 9, 2020
35
0
26
Ok. So I have to understand that generally Brine ret. tank room, Co2 evaporator and brine pump are designed to cool food in nearby refrigerators.
Was the brine just plain salt water from the ocean?
 
Dec 27, 2017
75
50
48
Isle of Man
Damian, the brine was a very highly concentrated salt solution and wasn't anything like seawater. It ran in a closed loop system as part of the refrigeration equipment, hence 'brine return tank'.
 

Damian2104

Member
Apr 9, 2020
35
0
26
Thanks. You dispelled my doubts.
And you can tell me more about the room next door. It's about dicharge recess. What was its function? What was the purpose of the pipes coming from the turbine and running to the side of the ship? What role did the destilers on the other side play?
 
Dec 27, 2017
75
50
48
Isle of Man
The discharge recess was the area where the pipes carrying the cooling water from the main condensers exited the hull. Its not a room as such just an area containing the outfalls. The large blocks on the side of the turbine are the main condensers which used huge amounts of seawater to cool the steam back to usable water.

The distillers were for producing feed water to top up the boilers- not for potable use. The boilers required very pure water to reduce corrosion with minimum contaminants. Largely they reused the condensed steam but unavoidable losses meant that a small shortfall had to be constantly made up.
 

TimTurner

Member
Dec 11, 2012
468
67
93
Well, it's a big ship so there's plenty to write :)

Hope this all helps. There's always more for all of us to learn.
 

Damian2104

Member
Apr 9, 2020
35
0
26
Without your help in the forum I would probably never have found so much interesting information about the Titanic. I know a lot about the ship in general. But after analyzing the plans, I see that there is still a lot to analyze.
As I wrote earlier, information on the Titanic in Poland is very limited. Here, I learn something new all the time :)
 

Damian2104

Member
Apr 9, 2020
35
0
26
Welcome back. I have a question about Post Office and Mailroom. There are Regs Letters at the post office on boat G. What does it mean? Do I understand correctly that Letter Cage is just letter baskets? In the Mailroom on the Orlopdeck there is a Specie room. What was the room for? Was the engine opposite the stairs a hoist engine? Were newspapers printed on the ship or taken from the port?
 
Dec 27, 2017
75
50
48
Isle of Man
Damian, taking your questions in order. Registered Letters required a signature from the recipient and were usually important correspondence that the sender paid a premium for special service. Letter cages held unsorted mail. The specie room was a secure vault for the carriage of high value items like gold, silver or other precious metals in bulk. I don't think it was in use on this voyage. The motor you ask about was probably the hoist motor, yes. And finally Newspapers as we know them were not printed on board. Some 'headlines' were received by the Marconi office and displayed on notice boards I think but that was about it.
 

Damian2104

Member
Apr 9, 2020
35
0
26
Thanks. This is what I ment. I always have a problem with these shortcuts.
Or maybe you could help me with one more thing. Passengers' cabins are located on this side deck on the port side. There is information "Portable 3rd class White Star Pattern". What's this about?
 
Dec 27, 2017
75
50
48
Isle of Man
I'll have to take a guess and say that cabin area was made up of temporary cabins that could be disassembled if the room was required for storage or open 3rd Class berthing. I believe White Star had a standard design of convertible cabin walls for this purpose?
Others may know more.
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Mar 16, 2000
5,055
339
433
The paint store is obvious. A steel ship needs endless painting, so she's touched up as often as possible. I once knew a man who had a paint locker on his small, steel yacht. He used to patch up the most minor dings, such as those made by the anchor.
 

TimTurner

Member
Dec 11, 2012
468
67
93
It's likely those were removable walls. If I recall, the online blueprints for the Olympic showed that berthing space as an open bay.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Similar threads

Similar threads