LEST WE FORGET PART 2 As The Lusitania Went Down


Mike Poirier

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Dec 31, 2004
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Hello Mark
Glad to hear that you have enjoyed the article thus far. You'll have to let us know which stories you like the best as we are trying to gauge what stories to tell in the next installment.

Senan- I wouldn't say that Jim and I have been missing out on overseas resources as you can see there have been quite a few stories and pictures in parts one and two that were not from American libraries or sources. In fact, I am sure you'll enjoy one of the Irish connections in this edition.
Mike
 

matthew ewing

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Oct 10, 2005
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The lucintania, yes i know i spelled it wrong, sorry about that. It sank in like 50 minutes, didn't it? sad. if it did, then people would have never been able to get all the lifeboats off in time. I have done some research on it, but very little. i do know that the torpedo ruined breakfast. and that the ship was a nursing vessel. but what I don't know is why a sub. would blow one up if it was full of injured people?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>It sank in like 50 minutes, didn't it? <<

Actually, it was 18 minutes at most between the torpedo and hitting the bottom.

>>i do know that the torpedo ruined breakfast. and that the ship was a nursing vessel.<<

I think you have the Lusitania confused with the HMHS Britannic which struck a mine and took about fifty minutes to sink. The Lusitania was torpedoed in the afternoon. The Lusitania had not been taken into government service and was one of the few liners making regular transatlantic runs between the U.K. and the United States at the time.

If you're interested in Britannic, click on Hospital Ship Britannic.
 

Senan Molony

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Jan 30, 2004
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Hi Mike,

No I'm not suggesting you are missing out on overseas resources, have done so, or ever will.

I just know that I have only been able to go over the familiar US newspapers over here, such as the New York Herald etc. That is frustrating, because US newspapers used pictures more in 1915 (even if, as Jim says, they were often reduced to line drawings) than did the Irish and British ones.

The more pix one sees, the better the chances of figuring out who are some of the anonymous survivors pictured in Queenstown.

Crew are the most difficult, as newspapers hardly bothered printing their pictures, obviously preferring passengers.

What is also evident, from having gone through all the newspapers over here, is that the Lusitania lasted far longer as a story in American papers than it did in the British Isles - what with the American Notes, etc.

In our newspapers it is almost as if she is gone in 20 minutes. That's because they were directly involved in a war and it didn't stand still.

Frustrating for me, anyway.
 

Mike Poirier

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Dec 31, 2004
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Yes Senan-
I agree that overseas that if it wasn't run by the 15 or 16 of May it was old news, although I think a every once in awhile we've come across a later account due to the person being away and the newspaper needed some news.
 

Jim Kalafus

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I find that "second city" papers are where one finds the more obscure and therefore interesting photos. Particularly "second cities" where survivors or victims lived. The American big city dailies tended to run the same news service photos (Vanderbilt, Frohman, Turner, Hubbard)with, if one is lucky, a photo or two of a less well known passenger buried somewhere around page 7. I also find that the longer the cities held off on converting to microfiche, the better the result was. Mike can attest to the condition of the microfiche volume of my hometown paper, transferred circa 1982, and at a resolution which leave it all but unreadable with no preserved hard copy.
 

Jim Kalafus

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MRS OGDEN HAMMOND 2. Was not sure of where to file this odd piece of liner ephemera with its tenuous link to the Lusitania:

lwf_ogden_hammond.jpg


This vivid Park Avenue Matron, as the the copy describes her, is the daughter in law of Ogden Hammond who survived the Lusitania, and the sister in law of Millicent Fenwick, who lost her mother, Mary Hammond, in the disaster. The text is both comic and tragic, and the combination of swimming and smoking certainly not the best. Am remembering, not fondly, the staple of "risque" Catskills humor ca. 1960: "Nine out of ten men who've tried Camels....prefer women." (Pause for big laughs) "Thanks folks! Encyclopedia Titanica audiences are always the best audiences!"
 

Mike Poirier

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Anyone interested in ships, should pick up Her Way, by Amy Shapiro. It is the life of Millicent Fenwick, whose parents, Ogden and Mary Hammond were aboard the Lusitania. Funny thing about the book, very little is said of Ogden, jr, but nice to see from the ad that he married.
 

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