Liberty Bell 7


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Philip Hind

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Just saw an interesting programme about the Liberty bell 7. The capsule that sent Guss Grissom into space in 1961. The capsule was lost at sea during recovery though Grissom was rescued.

The capsule lay at the bottom of the Atlantic until last year when it was recovered.

The team searching for it used the Magellen ROV that was used on recent Titanic expeditions and a side scan sonar.

The strange thing was that they found this object, about the size of a refrigerator, using the sonar at a depth even greater than the Titanic. Having pinpointed several likely traces they sent the ROV down and found it first time!

Fortunately perhaps Jack Grimm just never had their luck! Mind you they did manage to lose the Magellen in the process!

I found more info at this site: In Search of Liberty bell 7
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Thanks for posting this one, Phil. I saw the Discovery channel special on this one last year. It was a bit short on information in regards the immidiate condition of the spacecraft though. I hope there's more out there.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Thanks so much Phil.
I wonder if the fact that the had the capsule and had actually rescused Grissom from it, plsu that the capsule probably had the most intricate homing device on it helped in their search. If planes have littell black boxes, surely those capsules had something on it to track it. In the case of Titanic, they were looking for a large ship, but on a seafloor of a wide area, with the wrong location. I thnk that those things contributed to the location problems for Titanic.
Maureen.
 
Sep 12, 2000
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No, wait Phil...I need to explain of course that I saw all of this on video...being the mere 29 years old, I of course was not even around at this time.
happy.gif
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Hi Mo, and I think a homing beacon was not standard equipment aboard the Mercury spacecraft. Or any other for that matter with weight being the critcal issue. Even a few extra unneeded ounces adds up to big costs in getting the beast to orbit.

Besides, after 38 years underwater, any such beacon would be long dead anyway.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Sep 12, 2000
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Meeeeep......Meeeeep.......----------

So, 38 years underwater you think it doesn;t work anymore. he he

But they must have had something on there cause they always could find the capsule within minutes of touchdown. Was that because of radio transmission of their lat/long information as they landed or what?
Maureen.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Actually, the spacecraft was tracked all the way from liftoff to splashdown by ground based systems. They still are even today. If you go to NASA's channel, you'll see the Shuttle Discovery is tracked so closely that her exact position is known at all times.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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