Library Books

Cara Ginter

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Aug 7, 2005
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Which books do you think would have been popular among Titanic's first class passengers? Was Jane Austin among them? I've read Shakespeare was, but do you know of any else? I'm wanting to write novel, but I need a bunch of information so that's why I've been asking so many questions. ;)
So if any of you have any ideas, I'd be very glad!
Thanks,
Cara
 
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May 1, 2004
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Cara,
I suggest it depends on your characters. I'm fond of Jane Austen's works and I'm a middlebrow. But Jane was early 19th century and probably not popular fiction in 1912. If your character likes the classics, she may prefer to read Austen or the Brontes or Dickens or Trollope or Thackeray, even though they weren't modern - and some aren't all that light. Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray" Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" (old classic, but was probably popular then) Did Teddy Roosevelt write a book?

A. Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories would be a good bet for a boy or even a man. (He was writing them off and on until 1927) And Doyle wrote other genre fiction too. Same with Kipling. Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) died in 1910, but his major works are always popular. Booth Tarkington. Lucille Maud Montgomery (her Anne of Green Gables and others of the same genre) I don't know if H.G. Wells was writing then. Hemingway wasn't yet, but a bio about him might say who influenced his early writing.
Are you close to a large library (public or university)? If so, there may be copies of old magazines like the Strand or Colliers or Liberty. They may be on the internet as well. Several good and not so good writers wrote short stories for the magazines. Or try the newspapers on microfilm. Sometimes papers (like the New York Times) reviewed the new books.

Sax Rohmer and Jacques Futrelle for mysteries (and Mr. F. died on Titanic. So did W. T. Stead) Elinor Glyn may be been writing then. P.G. Wodehouse had not started his Jeeves or his Emsworth novels yet, but he was writing public school stories for boys in the early 1900's. I don't know offhand, but I think Psmith and Stanley Featherstone Ukridge may have been among his characters way back then.

I believe Walter Lord mentioned Owen Wister's - "The Virginian" was in the library on board in his "A Night to Remember".

And then, not everyone liked to read for pleasure. I don't know if Marconi provided a news service from Cape Race, but there was a shipboard newspaper, wasn't there? There may be editions of the Times (London) and other papers on board (dated the day of sailing). Businessmen would want to know what was going on.
 

Brian Ahern

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Dec 19, 2002
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Then there are of course the works of Forster, Wharton and James.

And one of Helen Churchill Candee's books was a novel called "An Oklahoma Romance". Fellow survivor May Futrelle had published a novel called "A Secretary of Frivolity" or "A Secretary of Frivolous Affairs". Not sure which.

James Joyce had published a few things but was not yet famous.

Winston Churchill had probably published some non-fiction by this point.

I ditto everything Marilyn said.

This is a fun topic. And I think it's awesome that you're ambitious enough to want to write a novel at your age. That bodes good things, since one of the hardest things about writing is sitting down to do it. Case in point - I have a deadline tomorrow and I'm fiddling around in here!
 
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Cara Ginter

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Aug 7, 2005
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Why thank you.
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I love to write. I just recently submitted a short story to a competition, (not a Titanic one though) but I will have to wait ages (I'm not really sure how long!) to see if I placed.
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I really hope so. But yah, I love to write, and I love reading about Titanic, and the story. And I know quite a bit about it, just not some of the smaller, more over looked details. So I wanted to be sure to get things right.
happy.gif

Yup yup. That's me. ;)
Cara
 
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Lynda Franklin

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I got a Sears Collectibles guide for the years 1905-1910 and I am looking though project gutenberg to see how many titles there are.Too fun.
 

Anna Simpson

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Jun 29, 2012
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What books were on board Titanic? Also, what type of books were popular at the time?

Thanks in advance!

~Anna