Life Boats


Yourj Benig

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Apr 27, 2012
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Are you a new fan of the TITANIC? well, I'm welcoming you. :D My answer was almost all of the lifeboats had a lot space when they left the ship. Lifeboat 11 was overloaded with 70 people but it could only occupy 65 people..
 

J Burdette

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Dec 30, 2011
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Like Yourj said, many of the boats were not filled to their capacity. This was, from what I've read of the US Inquiry, due to people unwilling to leave; that when there when no more women to fill some and there were still room for more they were lowered anyway; officers were afraid the boats would buckle when lowered with so many people aboard; the boats were to return and take on more people, but didn't (that is while the ship was still afloat). I think that all correct, but you better ask someone who knows for sure. I'm an amateur.
 
Jun 27, 2012
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Sir J Burdette and Yourj I would like to know you that according to the designer Mr. Thomas Andrews, the life boats had a capacity to carry at least 65 passengers in one life boat, but it had a capacity and it would not buckle when lowered with 60 or 65 passengers. i exactly don't know but when Mr. Andrews came to know that life boats are carrying only 20 to 25 passengers he told to the officer to fill more passengers but it was to late because many life boats were gone. if the life boats had filled full with passengers i think the number deaths would been very less.
 

J Burdette

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Dec 30, 2011
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It was certain officers' opinion the boats would buckle. Pitman's testimony during the British Inquiry:

15267. We have heard it stated by Mr. Lightoller that he lowered the boats because he thought there were enough people in them to lower with safety. Will you tell us what you consider is the weakest part of the tackle for lowering a boat? Is it the block or the falls or the shackles or what. We want to find out, because Mr. Lightoller said he was afraid of something giving way?
- I do not know.

The Commissioner:
I do not know that he said he thought the tackle might give way, but he thought the boat might break.

Mr. Cotter:
Yes, the boat might break; the boat might buckle.

The Commissioner:
Yes.

15268. (Mr. Cotter.) Is that your idea, that the boat might buckle or the shackles might give way?
- I do not know whether they would or not.

15269. Do you think it would be safe to lower 60 people in one of those boats from a height of 70 feet?
- I do not know what I might do if I was placed in that position.

15270. I say now supposing you had to go through the operation again do you think it would be safe to put 70 people in or 68 people?
- I would do now, yes, because I have found out since you could lower 80 in them.
 
Mar 18, 2008
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Sir J Burdette and Yourj I would like to know you that according to the designer Mr. Thomas Andrews, the life boats had a capacity to carry at least 65 passengers in one life boat, but it had a capacity and it would not buckle when lowered with 60 or 65 passengers. i exactly don't know but when Mr. Andrews came to know that life boats are carrying only 20 to 25 passengers he told to the officer to fill more passengers but it was to late because many life boats were gone. if the life boats had filled full with passengers i think the number deaths would been very less.

There is no evidence that Thomas Andrews ever made such a statement to the officers as shown in the 1997 Titanic movie. For the builders it was known that the boats were save and could be lowered fully loaded but the question is if the officers knew that.
If each boat had been fully loaded (and if they had time to load and lower boats A & B) some additional 500 people could have been saved. Unfortunately even in the last 30 minutes the boats on the port side were lowered partly filled.
 

Tommy

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Jul 21, 2012
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Most of the lifeboats were not fully loaded. Titanic's lifeboats could hold 1,178 people in total:

14 standard boats which could hold 65 per boat = 910
2 cutters which could hold 40 per boat = 80
4 collapsibles which could hold 47 per boat =188

705 people survived in lifeboats. Had they been filled to capacity, they could have saved an additional 473 people.
 

Scott Mills

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Jul 10, 2008
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As everyone has said, almost all the boats were under capacity. How much so depended on when the boats were launched, with later boats being much fuller.

That said this should demonstrate to you why it is that even with enough boats to evacuate everyone, the sinking would still have resulted in a similar survival rate.

Why? Because even loading the boats Titanic did have under capacity, the crew was unable to get all of these boats filled and away before the foundering.
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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In my e-book, I pointed out that the supposed capacity of the boats was highly imaginative. Book I gave the first and only analysis of the boats according to current SOLAS rules. I make it plain that the large boats could only hold 65 passengers by using unseamanlike cramming. The two emergency boats were even worse. These supposedly could hold 40. Go to a handy yacht club and have a look at a good size trailer sailer. Now imagine 40 people on board and you'll see the absurdity of the rules. Those loading boats didn't do such a bad job when the realities are considered. The main thing they did wrong was leaving the collapsibles till last. A party should have been assigned to get them ready very early on. Anyone could see they would be hard to prepare and lower.

The real damage was done on shore, long before Titanic sailed, especially by Sir Alfred Chalmers. Never heard of him. Read and learn!
 

Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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There was a Board of Trade formula for calculating the capacity of a lifeboat. In Class A and B boats..standard lifeboat and Collapsible boat, each person was allocated 10 cubic feet of space. The emergency boats which were class D were allocated 8 cubic feet per person.

From the UK Inquiry Day17.. evidence of Harold A.Sanderson White Star Company director:

""The remaining boats may also be of such description, or may, in the option of the shipowner, conform to Section (C.), or section (D.), provided that not more than two boats shall be of Section (D.)" Now, it is those two boats of Section (D.) which are calculated at the rate of 8 cubic feet per person instead of 10 cubic feet."

The volume of the internal space of each boat was calculated then an amount of space which could not be normally used for a passengers was deducted. Deducted spaces were mainly the spaces under the thwarts (cross benches), bow and stern spaces and side seats as well as any permanent ballast and storage spaces.

The calculation for a Titanic boat might have been 30' x 9' x 4' x 0.8 = 864 cu. feet minus about 214 cu feet = 650 feet divided by 10 = 65 persons. (Lowe said 65.5)

The method of lowering these boats made it very dangerous to load them full to capacity.

Jim C.
 

Scott Mills

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In my e-book, I pointed out that the supposed capacity of the boats was highly imaginative. Book I gave the first and only analysis of the boats according to current SOLAS rules. I make it plain that the large boats could only hold 65 passengers by using unseamanlike cramming. The two emergency boats were even worse. These supposedly could hold 40. Go to a handy yacht club and have a look at a good size trailer sailer. Now imagine 40 people on board and you'll see the absurdity of the rules. Those loading boats didn't do such a bad job when the realities are considered. The main thing they did wrong was leaving the collapsibles till last. A party should have been assigned to get them ready very early on. Anyone could see they would be hard to prepare and lower.

The real damage was done on shore, long before Titanic sailed, especially by Sir Alfred Chalmers. Never heard of him. Read and learn!
Dave,

Very interesting! I find myself agreeing with you completely.

I will say that the issue with the boats/allocating people to ready the collpasibles really highlights the number of ABS available to complete the task.

I think there were around 47 on Titanic who would need to handle this task as well as help load, launch, then man the boats.

Any way you look at it, there just wasn't enough time.
 

Dave Gittins

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Things have changed since 1999, when that book was published. We now have accurate names of all survivors, complete with false names.
 

Dave Gittins

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I don't know which was bigger, but the difference was inconsequential. One was 25'2" x 7'2" and the other was 25'2" x 7'1".
 

Dave Gittins

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In those days, boats were built partly by eye. Evidently the boats were meant to be identical but when finished and measured they were not quite the same.
 
Nov 13, 2014
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Most of the lifeboats were not fully loaded. Titanic's lifeboats could hold 1,178 people in total:

14 standard boats which could hold 65 per boat = 910
2 cutters which could hold 40 per boat = 80
4 collapsibles which could hold 47 per boat =188

705 people survived in lifeboats. Had they been filled to capacity, they could have saved an additional 473 people.
But even with all 20 lifeboats at full capacity and 1178 survivors, there would still be over 1000 men without a chance of survival.
 

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