Life For The Second Class

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Apart from a few titles specifically mentioned in passengers' accounts, we have no way of knowing what was in the library cabinets. But we do know that historical adventures were very popular with Edwardian readers, so it's quite likely that the works of Dumas would have been stocked. By all means place a copy in the book cabinet - nobody can say it wasn't there!
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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They'd tell the person to get over it, or come to terms with it, just as we would. If you want to get a feel for the speech patterns of the time it would be a good idea to read a few novels that were written in the Edwardian period. There are plenty that can be downloaded free from the Project Gutenberg website. The best choices would depend on what social class your characters are from, and whether they are American or British. For the British middle class, try the works of E M Forster, like Howard's End (1910) - describes loads of train journeys, which you were enquiring about in another thread.
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May 7, 2005
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In response to a previous post.
The Gymnasium was at one time open to 2nd Class Passengers, but only for a little while before the voyage took place. There was a gap of time in which 2nd Class Passengers were free to tour the 1st class facilities. The reason that Lawrence Beesley was seen in the photograph is because his picture was taken during the gap of time the passengers were touring. But is only logical that you assumed it was open.
 
Dec 31, 2003
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Lily: I feel certain that among the hundreds of books - each numbered in gilt on the spine - the modern classic 'The Three Musketeers' would have been found. And Captain Smith's own favourite; 'Moby Dick'.
 

Kyrila Scully

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Apr 15, 2001
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Lily, how long have you been studying Titanic? I ask because the longer you've been studying the ship and her passengers and crew, the more you will come to know them intimately and hear their voices as you write. There are as many stories to tell as there are people who were on the ship. There are as many locations as you can find on the ship's blueprints. I suggest a thorough reading of Craig Stringer's and Bruce Beveridge's works on the passengers, crew and the ship. If you can't afford these (and believe me, writers invest heavily into their research for each novel) then you must delve into every book you find in the library and every legitimate research source online.

If you need any advice about the technical aspect of writing, I'll be happy to look over your work and review it. But I must tell you - when I write, I invite criticism for my own writing because it only makes me a better writer and my story a better read. I hope you will be good enough to accept any advice I may offer with the foresight to know that I am only trying to help you be a better writer, too!

Kind regards,
Kyrila Scully
 

Lily Peters

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Jun 18, 2005
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I've been seriously studying Titanic since I was eleven, Kyrila. In fact, it was research that brought me here to Encyclopedia Titanica and I'm very happy that my questions are getting answered. Right now I'm reading Howard's End and plan to find all the books I can to fully understand the subject matter.

Thank you all very, very much.
happy.gif


~Lily~
 

Lily Peters

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Jun 18, 2005
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I have one last question, if I may be permitted to ask it. Were D88 and D89 directly across the corridor from one another? Thank you again!

~Lily~
 

Lily Peters

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Jun 18, 2005
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Thank you, Lester; I see what you mean. Now, obviously the second class didn't have private bathroom facilities, so where would they bathe during the course of the voyage?

~Lily~
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Hello Lily,

Hardly any of the 1st Class passengers had their own private bathrooms.

For 2nd Class those on D-deck used the bathroom and lavatory facilities as marked on the deck plan I referred you do. Unfortunately that plan is incomplete. - See the attached. - Men on the port-side with 4 bathrooms. Ladies on the starboard-side with 3 bathrooms. Aft of each set were 3rd Class lavatories. Also shown are the two 3rd Class bathrooms.
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2nd Class bathrooms
2nd Class D-deck bathrooms.bmp (11.2 k)[/td][/tr][/table]​
 

Lily Peters

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Jun 18, 2005
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Okay, thank you; I just needed it for general information. Were the men and ladies put in staterooms on opposite sides of the ship? I have put the father and sons in my fictional second class family in D86. The mother and daughters are in D88. Are those two staterooms across the corridor from each other?

~Lily~
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Yes, those cabins were on opposite sides of a short side corridor, and both were 'outers' with a porthole. D86 was a 2-berth cabin, and D88 a 4-berth. If your story requires two 4-berth cabins, move your people slightly forward to the next side alley and into D74 and D68. If the children were young (ie under 12) it would be ok to have them sleeping two to a berth, or a very young child could have shared a berth with a parent.

Only the single men travelling in 3rd class were segregated from the single women and families.
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Dec 6, 2000
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Lily,

You could keep D-88, and have D-84 as the other room. It is an outside 4-berth tamdem style room. - For rooms sizes see the attached. - By the way D-89 was only a 2-berth room.
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2nd Class rooms
2nd Class D-deck rooms.bmp (19.7 k)[/td][/tr][/table]​
 

Lily Peters

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Jun 18, 2005
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Thank you, Lester, but I think I'm going to do what Bob said and move them into D74 and D68. Did either of these two four-berth staterooms have portholes?

~Lily~
 

Lily Peters

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Jun 18, 2005
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Were D55 and D62 two-berth cabins? That's where the other two main characters and travel companions are bunked. I need to know if these also had portholes.

~Lily~
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Lily, based on what I have already posted you can see that D-62 was an inside 2-berth room. For the location of D-55 also an inside 2-berth room see the attached.
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D-55 and D-62
D-deck starboard-side.bmp (8.3 k)[/td][/tr][/table]​