Life Saving Devices

As an afterthought, and impending brainstorm on my part. As we all know the fourth funnel acted as a dummy stack, bespoking a majestic strength superior to a three stacked steamer. I realize a certain amount of exhaust was dispersed from the lower decks (i.e. galley) by a minimal of vertical piping affixed to the inards of the *dummy*. These
could be essentially *relocated*.

Drawing on pure (Phil)hindsight...how about, at the time of her fitting out, the floating crane of the basin *stocked* the fourth funnel with (one atop the other) appropriate measured (In order to fit the ovate shpoe of the funnel) cork preserver (similar to the actual on Titanic's sun-deck), however, having them canvas topped, with an adjustable brim (As the collapsibles had).

As for access...the extreme rear of the fourth funnel base would be removeable, thereby enabling the *rafts* to slide out, and working in conjunction with the *jacobs ladder*, lowered to the sea.

Considering the greater percentage of fore/head-on damage,
the farthest aft funnel would allow ample time. With acception to such case as Lusitania's brief death cry.

A helluv alot better than hypothermia...

Michael Cundiff
 
I have checked the regulations front to back, but nowhere can I find a "life funnel." There are lifeboats, liferafts and life rings...no life funnels.

--David G. Brown
 
I ask that your pardon me..for on this, my initial post, obly to later realizd by self notification that I had set foot into a far differentiating
topic than which the secondary heading substantiates...."Life Saving Devices"

I failed to recognize the preceding heading which reads: MARKET PLACE

I'll take my idea to bed with me and play on it...

Michael Cundiff
(Who utterly despises a TITANIC marketplace. A second *love* of mine destroyed by a monetary value placement)
 
David:

Then please also bear in mind...nowhere does a
regulation for deck storage confront the matter of which the *easy chairs* of QUEEN MARY be confined to an avaialble space of the number three stack.

A matter of fact!

Michael Cundiff
 
Anyone catch the History channel this afternoon-? program on survival in all sorts of conditions. A rather large segment was devoted to Titanic and hypothermia. They estimate a person would have gone from stupor to coma in 30 minutes or less but might have survived as long as an hour. The new hypothermia suit was shown- bright orange with built- in head rest. Also featured was a chute which pops out the side of the ship ,towing life rafts (looks a lot like a plane evac-chute but enclosed). Passengers need never get their heads wet. This will probably be rebroadcast Sunday. Also shown was a portable decompression chamber- looked like a long worm, wrapped in cargo netting- easily moveable with 2 people and completely effective.
 
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