Lifeboat food

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ScottyBK

Member
I know Joughin came on deck and put bread in some of the lifeboats. Would he have brought butter etc.too? Was the head chef also supposed to stock the boats with say cold meats, Cheese, things like that? I never heard of anyone but Joughin fooding the boats. Were the kitchen workers on boat crew supposed to bring the food to the boat stations?

I realize you can't expect a 4 course meal on the lifeboat , but some cold meat and such would seem a good idea. Lifeboats today Im sure have freeze dried food enough to supply 2000 calories per day, also baby formula, desalination machines, etc.
 
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
Titanic's lifeboats were supposed to be stocked with provisions but most weren't or had very little. It would have been most likely tins of biscuits and water that had a long shelf life. BOT regs were weak in those days and probably left up to the individual shipping commpanies but don't quote me on that. They wouldn't be stocked up with food that would go bad in a day or 2. It probably wasn't a priority because like many have pointed out they viewed the lifeboats as transports to get from one ship to another in a matter of hours...not a swiss family robison scenario. I have read that today during some lifeboat drills they will point out that it's ok to stuff your pockets with food..candy/granola bars...ect. I think in that situation if I could that might included a pint of Jack. Of course one would have to be willing to share. Cheers.
 
Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
Titanic's lifeboats were supposed to be stocked with provisions but most weren't or had very little.
That's probably because the delays and disruption caused to its maiden voyage due to the Olympic-Hawke incident, the coal strike etc. I read somewhere that Thomas Andrews was giving instructions about decor of rooms etc right up to the day before departure. I guess with so many things in mind, they simply did not consider the need to provide lifeboats with supplies.

It would have been most likely tins of biscuits and water that had a long shelf life.
I have always wondered, what were the ingredients of a "ship's biscuit" in those days? As a matter of fact, even today I think the Americans call our sort of biscuits as "cookies" while a 'biscuit' is some sort of farmhouse product. I have eaten some of those in the US and they are quite good with a mug of strong coffee in the morning or afternoon.

I would have thought the might have provided fruit like apples and oranges in lifeboats. They have a good shelf life at least for the duration of the voyage under those coldish conditions.
 
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ScottyBK

Member
In America "cookies" are a desset item/treat, like "chocolate chip cookies." Biscuits here are eaten with dinner, sort of like small pieces of bread.

I agree that fruits woud be a good idea., also some savory item like a nice rib or joint of cold beef. Maybe even a small oil stove so that if it came to it they could cook and warm up foods whilst onboard.
 
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
That's probably because the delays and disruption caused to its maiden voyage due to the Olympic-Hawke incident, the coal strike etc. I read somewhere that Thomas Andrews was giving instructions about decor of rooms etc right up to the day before departure. I guess with so many things in mind, they simply did not consider the need to provide lifeboats with supplies.


I have always wondered, what were the ingredients of a "ship's biscuit" in those days? As a matter of fact, even today I think the Americans call our sort of biscuits as "cookies" while a 'biscuit' is some sort of farmhouse product. I have eaten some of those in the US and they are quite good with a mug of strong coffee in the morning or afternoon.

I would have thought the might have provided fruit like apples and oranges in lifeboats. They have a good shelf life at least for the duration of the voyage under those coldish conditions.
To me regular biscuits are what you bake in the oven or a kettle when out camping...covered in gravy and in my case a healthy dose of tabasco sauce. But survival biscuits at leastt to me are more like hard tack. They'll last for 20 years in tins. But for you and ScottyBK if interested I ran across this looking for something else. From the British Inquiery.

The Commissioner:
I suppose he only says that because he only saw some women come up. Some certainly did come up and got into his boat.


3648. (Mr. Cotter.) You are not sure what was going on down below?
- No.


3649. You say the second steward, Mr. Dodd, came back with a dust coat over his head?
- Yes, he had his dust coat in his hand and gave me his lifebelt, and did not come back for it.


3650. Did he give any orders?
- No, he gave orders in the glory hole; he had no business to give orders on the deck.


3651. Are you sure he had no right to give orders to the steward department on deck?
- Certainly not; it is under the Officers, that.


3652. Now when you got into the boat did you find any biscuits and water there?
- No. I trampled over a loaf of bread, a big pan loaf; there were biscuits carried up, but nobody seemed to care to put them in.


3653. Who carried the biscuits up?
- Williams had one box - Billy Williams - and there might have been four or five boxes carried up through the companion way. They were shoving each other on.


3654. There were some stewards bringing the stores up?
- Yes, they were bringing the stores up.


 
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ScottyBK

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I wonder when the Carpathia brought the boats up if they threw the bread and such overboard ? It had to be kind of stale by then, I mean whatever wasn't eaten whilst they were still in/on the lifeboats.
 
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