Lightoller Memorial


Inger Sheil

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Feb 9, 1999
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Following hard on the heels of the unveiling of the new Moody memorial plaque in Scarborough earlier this year, and anticipating another memorial commemorating one of the Titanic's deck officers that will hopefully be announced shortly, comes word from Richmond of recognition at last for the Titanic's senior surviving officer.

Lack of a memorial for Charles Lightoller has often been cause for comment - I've been out to Mortlake Cemetery and photographed the rose garden where his ashes were scattered, but it's not quite the same.

On June 30th the Sundowner was brought up to serve as a backdrop for the ceremony last week at Richmond's Rag Ragatta where, in the presence of the Mayor of Richmond and many members of the Lightoller family, the plaque was unveiled.

I hope to be out there soon to photograph the plaque - just heard about this today from a friend who lives locally.

It should be a source of some gratification to those with an interest in Lightoller and the Titanic to finally see a form of recognition for this remarkable individual.
 

Pat Winship

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May 14, 1999
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It's good to know that Lightoller is being kindly remembered by the folks in the places that knew him best. It's a shame they tore the Ducks Walk house down-- and thanks, Ing, for showing me the picture of it-- but at least there's the Sundowner, and now the plaque.

Pat W
 

Inger Sheil

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Feb 9, 1999
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Hallo Pat -

Yes, it's a terrible shame that they tore the house down. This was over the objections of local residents, I might add, who were well aware of the site's significance and who I understand campaigned to save it.
 
S

sharon rutman

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Amen! At last some overdue recognition to this extraordinary individual! If anyone deserves medals and accolades it was CH Lightoller. I am also incensed at his shabby treatment at the hands of the White Star Line in later years. If it weren't for his coolness under pressure (even Captain Smith had no idea what to do during the crisis), the loss of life would have been more horrendous than it was. Can you tell me who was present, please for this occasion? You know me by now, constantly snooping in the Lightoller keyhole. What does the Sundowner look like now?
 

Pat Winship

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May 14, 1999
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Hello, all

On the second try in as many years, I finally got a reply from Michael Hunt, chief curator of the East Kent Maritime Trust, as to whether the clock removed by Lightoller from the Oceanic's bridge was still on the Sundowner Unfortunately, it is not. Mr. Hunt believes that it may have been taken out by Sylvia Lightoller, when she sold the boat in 1964, but indicates that no one really knows what has become of it.

Pat W
 

Inger Sheil

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Feb 9, 1999
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G'day Pat -

While it's disappointing to know the Lightoller clock has left the Sundowner, it would be nice to think it was still somewhere with the Lightoller family.

Just hope it hasn't vanished into some private collection.

Lightoller's farewell to his old ship, after having gone through the sensation of feeling it break under him when she was run aground, is one of the most poignant passages in TAOS.
 
Jan 31, 2001
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Good to hear that there is now a Lightoller memorial - and interesting to see that it is in my home state. I had no idea that the Sundowner still existed. That is very cool.
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Aug 20, 2000
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This is great that finally there is a Lightoller memorial. It's about time he received some recongnition for what he did, and I agree with Sharon's post.

Thanks for letting us know Inger, and thanks to Patricia for posting those pictures of the Sundowner. I never knew she still existed either, and she looks like she is in wonderful condition.

Best regards,

Jason
happy.gif
 

Don Tweed

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May 5, 2002
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It is very satisfying to see Lights get his due.
From Titanic to Dunkirk and beyond, he was a true mariner.
It is a shame that by association with Ismay at the hearings that he did not receive the recognition he deserved for the part he played that awful night.

-Don
 
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sharon rutman

Guest
AMEN to that!!! Sylvia was supposed to be so bitter about the way the White Star Line ignored her husband in later years and it was she who made Lights quit the sea. Even when he was leaving some flunky said" Oh you are leaving are you? Well good by." Tacky, tacky tacky.
 
C

Cassandra Crowther

Guest
Copy that, Sharon. No appreciation at all!

Thanks for the great link, Pat.
 
L

lg griffith

Guest
It has it place of honour in the library and if I remember right it still works. There are many things that belonged to Charles that are still around, like what he wore the night the Titanic went down.
 

Pat Winship

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May 14, 1999
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Hi, Ig

That's lovely about the clock! And about the clothes-- In addition to being a librarian, I have the coursework for a Masters Degree in Museum Studies, costume and textile conservation. Free advice on storage-- if anybody needs or wants it--is to store clothing as flat as possible,in acid-free cardboard boxes, pad all folds with acid-free tissue paper, keep away from heat, change the tissue every couple of years, and be very alert for moths. And do not, as one museum I visited did, confuse buffered tissue with the acid-free variety. Buffered tissue is intended for storing cotton and linen fibers ONLY, and can damage or destroy woolens.

(That's for all the rest of you listmembers, too, if you've got historic clothing to store, Titanic-connected or not! :) )

Pat W.
 

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