Lightoller Poorly Portrayed but still FANTASTIC

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Mark Robert Hopkins

Member
Looks interesting. Thanks, Bob.

By the way, what are the equivalents in British pounds?
 
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Bob Godfrey

Member
It's very close to 2 dollars to the pound these days. You can always get up-to-date currency conversions here:

http://www.xe.net/ucc/

By the way, ignore the reviewer on the Amazon page who refers to this software as a game. It's a multimedia information package.
 
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Mark Robert Hopkins

Member
I saw that. After having heard about it here, I was wondering about that, hehe.

At 2 dollars to the pound, the package would cost about $40.00 American.

Thanks again.
 
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Pat Winship

Member
True enough, Bob! Lightoller certainly never made himself out to be as clever and all-knowing as he's portrayed in ANTR. Sylvia had a great deal to do with that, and I've heard she tended to embroider and exaggerate things, especially when it came to her husband.

Pat W
 
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Allison Lane

Guest
Trolling through old posts and I just had to comment on this:

>> Small inaccuracy in the part that DID make the film. Jonathan Philips is shown scrambling onto the upturned lifeboat with his hat on his head. <<

Heh, I was just talking about this with my sister the other day--I was wondering how Wilde managed to get a lifebelt on between trying to get collapsible A launched and hugging the floating deck chair, plus I noted that he'd lost his hat. My sister responded that he'd gotten a pretty good dunking, of course he'd lost his hat. To which I said Lightoller practically got sent arse-over-teakettle by the funnel falling, yet the hat remained. :D

"So maybe he stapled it on, like Harrison Ford did in Indiana Jones," she replied.

:D


-Allison L.
 
Inger Sheil

Inger Sheil

Member
And whose hat was he wearing in the photo taken on board the Carpathia
Grin


Lowe seems to have kept his hat for many years - along with his uniform buttons from that night!
 
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Mark Robert Hopkins

Member
Actually, Inger, I don't remember seeing Lightoller or any of the officers aboard the Carpathia. Is this in reference to a photo of yet another ultimately delete scene/segment? Was there a seen with Lightoller talking with Rostron or the other officers? That would be interesting to see.

Furthermore, did JC film anything regarding Bride and his frozen feet as well as his helping Cotham out in the marconi room aboard the Carpathia?

It appears that a lot was filmed and removed.
 
Inger Sheil

Inger Sheil

Member
Sorry - no, I was referring in a confusing manner to an historic photograph of the real Lightoller on board the Carpathia conversing with Rostron! (Discussions of hats and what happened to them have often led to speculation about that particular shot).

The only officer in a deleted Carpathia scene I seem to recall is a brief moment of Lowe handing Rose a cup of tea.
 
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Allison Lane

Guest
There's a cut scene of Bride being carried onboard the Carpathia--looks like Hitchens and lookout Lee are carrying him. Ismay was walking right behind them.


-Allison L.
 
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Mark Robert Hopkins

Member
Allison, can you share that, please? I'd like to see it. In the real picture of this, I didn't recognize Hitchens or Lee as the bearers of Bride's load. It would be interesting to compare the movie shot of this with the actual one.

Inger,

Oh, my apologies! *face turns red* One question: Is it possible that the officers aboard the Carpathia could have provided a 'new' hat for Lightoller, a sort of 'sharing amongst brothers' kind of gesture, or a gesture of good will between fellow sailors? Perhaps, like many ships, they had a few extra stored away, or an officer aboard the Carpathia officer offered his 'extra' to Lights out of sympathy. Just thought.

Could you please provide that pic, Ing? I may or may not have seen it. I'd be very interested in seeing it when you have time to post it. Thanks.

Take care

--Mark
 
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Mark Robert Hopkins

Member
By the way, Inger, where are those officers' uniforms now? Are they still with the officers' families or are they in the Titanic museum? It would be interesting to see what those guys were actually wearing on that trip - and that night!
 
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Susan Alby

Member
>>It would be interesting to see what those guys were actually wearing on that trip - and that night<<

...Anything that was dry and warm! I think the passengers on the Carpathia generously gave some of their clothes to the Titanic survivors until their other clothes had been dried.
 
Inger Sheil

Inger Sheil

Member
I'll have to check the copyright on the photo, Mark. It's in the latest edition of Stenson's bio, though, so not too hard to find.

Lightoller knew at least one of the Carpathia's deck officers beforehand (Dean), so it's possible it was handed over from one mate to another, or as a gesture of solidarity. I don't think the image is clear enough to make out the cap badge, which would give clues. There certainly seems to have been a sense of the sea-faring fraternity about the whole thing - Bissett made kind comments about the surviving officers, and they were presented with signed photographs of the Carpathia's officers.

Some of the uniform items are still extant, but most are missing - Lowe presented at least one button to an American he got along with particularly well, and the family gave away others. The hat is now, unfortunately, lost (Harold W G Lowe did look for it as an adult but couldn't locate it). Other items unconnected with the Titanic disaster still exist - Lowe's RNR dress uniform bicorn, Pitman's RNR uniform, James Moody's uniform buttons from the Conway etc. Of these, only the Pitman items are currently on public display.
 
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Mark Robert Hopkins

Member
Sue,

That goes along with my thinking.


Inger,

>>The hat is now, unfortunately, lost (Harold W G Lowe did look for it as an adult but couldn't locate it).<<

If only the person who had found knew what he had and how valuable it was... hehe/


>>Of these, only the Pitman items are currently on public display.<<

That's a shame, it really is. I would've liked and felt comfort in the thought that all those uniforms, or replicas of them, were safe and either with the family or on display. You'd think that, as famous as the Titanic is, the descendants would have held onto these items. That's not in reference to monetary value, but for historical and sentimental significance.
 
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