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Jul 9, 2000
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>>i really shouldnt read these things,<<

Actually, you should read those things as inquiry transcripts are important primary sources. That doesn't mean that the witnesses are right, but at least you know what was said, by whom, and in it's proper context.

You have to take them with a grain...or even a boulder...of salt, but you can't quite dismiss them.
 

Jim Kalafus

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People in sea during and after final plunge: Based on TITANIC viewing would it be accurate to suggest that survivors would have thrashed about like that after the Lusi had left them behind? A difference of 10deg c or 19deg f

Not QUITE.

There was a huge amount of thrashing, as the people without life jackets who could not swim drowned. Within a minute or two the screaming had mostly stopped and survivor later described it as being oddly tranquil. Blue sky, a few white clouds, seagulls, and very little noise once the last of the non-swimmers sank.

However, unlike the Titanic, those who survived SAW everything in graphic detail....

_________________________________________

I was swimming some distance away from them when they first came under my notice. The man had got hold of a hatch cover and had lifted the child on to it. He himself was in the water clinging to the wreckage with one hand, while with the other he held the child, keeping her in a sitting position. Their case seemed hopeless. The child was about done for when I saw them, and the man was palpably near the extreme stage of exhaustion. He was as white as a ghost.

I turned on my back to rest, and when I looked again the man and child had disappeared, and the wreckage to which they had been clinging was floating away
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I had the presence of mind to swim away from the ship and towards a collapsible boat for this purpose I had to swim quite a distance. This boat began rocking. Every moment it seemed as if we should be thrown into the sea. I saw George Copping clinging to a rope, almost exhausted 'My wife is gone and I can't hold out much longer' were his last words.

__________________________________________-


People around me were drowning. I remember seeing a young girl with a lifebelt on calling 'mamma,' but she was not saved. I had seen her on the liner before and noticed her sister on a collapsible boat. I saw a cupboard, towards which I swam and managed to support myself until I saw a boat. I shouted and was taken on board, and from there was transferred to a trawler.

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The gulls were flying overhead and I remember noticing the beauty of the blue shadows which the sea throws up to their white feathers: they were very happy and alive and made me feel rather lonely; my thoughts went to my people, looking forward to seeing me, and at that moment having tea in the garden. The idea of their grief was unbearable; I had to cry a little.
 

Jim Kalafus

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I cringe at the words "according to ----- book" in general. They are a good starting off point, to whet the interest, but ultimately the only way you can REALLY get a handle on things is archival research.

That said, Diana Preston's book is towards the top of the tall, rather shaky, stack of Lusitania books. It did not contain the sort of errors that cause me to throw a book at the wall, and if someone was looking for a good Lusitania primer I'd steer them towards it or Hoehling.
 
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In the absence of Archival this section of ET is the next best.
In written form Preston is a good read. Hoehling is up there although the sinking narrative has flaws as it borrows from questionable sources i.e. the bow hitting the bottom while Turner is still onboard etc.
Eric Sauders' book RMS Lusitania : Aship and her Record published by Tempus is a must as is the book he co-authored with Ken Marschall.

Simpson should not be read unaccompanied by Bailey and Ryans' Lusitania Disaster.
Anything that still promotes exploding ammo is out with the exception of Paddy O'Sullivans book Lusitania: Unravelling the mysteries.
 
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>>Simpson should not be read unaccompanied by Bailey and Ryans' Lusitania Disaster. <<

I'll second that one. Bailey and Ryan wrote their book with a specific eye towards nuking a lot of the nonsense in Simpson's work, to say nothing of a number of other myths, and they did so without even having access to the same body of new source material that we have access to now.
 

Jim Kalafus

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READ SIMPSON.

His book is flawlessly annotated. He can save you 10 years of searching, if you order photocopies of his source material.

Which brings me to a plug....

Our article is shortly to appear. I have gotten the occasional, dismissive, "you dont footnote" email, from the occasional...highbrow...reader.

Yes. Right. We DONT footnote. And, guess what? You didnt PAY to read our article. We paid ALL the expenses incurred in writing it. If we dont footnote, you cant steal our material and claim it is yours. If you have a specific question about source, we'll tell you via IM.

Oh, and guess what? The article is booby trapped. I habitually omit a non-critical sentence or two from the quotes, without using an ellipse. You'll never notice it is missing but, believe me, if you lift from our article without crediting us, and then claim to have used primary source, WE will notice the omission.

The book will be footnoted.

*gasp*

Back to the thread. I had to get that off my chest....
 

Jim Kalafus

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We just have to record the musical jingle...our last names are not the easiest to gracefully work into a rhyme....and then we are good to go.
 
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