Linoleum


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Nathan Good

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Hi there,

Thank you both for the information, I too have read that quote as written in A Night To Remember. I couldn't agree more about not using the movie as a study piece, however I only recalled a claim that the Dining Saloon carpet was perfectly recreated. Obviously no one can dispute the tiles brought up from the wreck, I was just curious about the almost 'gloating' on the part of the film makers about this accuracy. The only reason I would have considered that the Dining Saloon may have been carpeted on Titanic and not on the Olympic was because of the other improvements to the newer ship. Thank you for clearing this up, glad to hear from you.

All the best,

Nathan Good
 

Lee Gilliland

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Feb 14, 2003
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Would it have been possible that the floor in the Dining Saloon be partially carpeted, like fancy stores today? I notice that the aisles between the tables would probably been wide enough, and certainly the problem with spillage would be larger in these areas. When you spilled anything on the table, the tablecloth would have soaked the majority of the spill up.
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Lee,

I am not aware of any evidence to suggest such an arrangement or precedent established by ships of similar equipage. The chairs in the First Class Dining Saloon were allowed to move, albeit in a restricted fashion, so some of the aisle space you mention would have to been left uncarpeted in order to accommodate the chairs' movement. Aesthetically, the Dining Saloon tile pattern was of a complicated pattern with eye-catching colour (bright blue, red and gold) that probably would have visually clashed with any other pattern laid over it.

A lot of stock is placed in Burgess's quote. Two-thirds of it has been proven wrong by direct evidence, if we are to assume that Burgess was suggesting that Titanic's furniture was heavier than Olympic's, or that Titanic's panelling was in any way more elaborate than Olympic's. I haven't seen anything in either my or others' research that gives me cause to believe the remaining one-third of Burgess's assertion.

Nathan,

The "gloating" that you refer to reflects the confidence both filmmamkers and the Titanic community at large had in their knowledge concerning the Dining Saloon floor covering in 1996. That confidence only looks misplaced in hindsight...the suggestion of a tile-covered deck in the Dining Saloon may have been suggested prior to that time, but it could not be fully explored until more evidence became available. That evidence turned out to be pieces of tile of the same pattern seen in Olympic photos that were discovered on and brought up from the Titanic wreck, but that evidence wasn't widely available (if at all) until after the film had hit theatres. I know this because I first suggested the possibility around 1998 (this is not to say I was the first to ever raise the idea...I eventually ran across others who also had reason to believe in the idea) and could not convince many people to buy into the theory at that time. The discovery of the tile fragments, though, prompted a re-assessment. Nowadays, the argument is a bit easier to make, but the new assertion is still far from being widely accepted (hence, the direction this thread has taken). This is but one example that I can use to explain why I concur with the notion that there are few facts about Titanic that can be undisputably known.

By the way, the cycle always seems to repeat. I am currently engaged in a similar battle over my assertion that the interior of the wheelhouse was tiled, not planked. I won't know until I see the final CG animation of Titanic in GotA if my argument and evidence was persuasive enough at this time...Cameron told me that the evidence that I presented him was compelling, but wasn't sure if the audience would accept such a visual change without it first being accepted fact within the Titanic community. And that process could take years.

Parks
 
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Lee Gilliland

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Parks, do they really? The planking (or what's left of it - the caulking on deck) looks fairly obvious to me even in the early Ballard photos.
 
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HMM! Parks, can I sit behind you in the auditorium and eavesdrop when you view GoTA?! Fascinating!
smile.gif
 
Mar 3, 1998
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Lee,

Yes, I have reason to believe that tiles covered the deck in Titanic's wheelhouse (not the outer bridge), just as they did in Britannic's. That's all that I'm willing to share at this time.

Colleen,

My wife would probably gladly trade places with you.

Parks
 
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Brian Hawley

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Oceanic's bridge had some type of tiling as well. Lightholer mentions using the ships roll to slide from one side of the bridge to another, once bumping into the captain who was not amused. I gathered though onboard Oceanic more than just the wheelhouse was tiled.


Brian
 

Bob Godfrey

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According to Lightoller, the covering on the Oceanic's bridge decking was rubber. Presumably it was there to provide a better footing, but when wet it delivered the opposite effect. He also mentioned that it was very hard to keep clean.
 
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Nigel Bryant

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Parks & All,

Another new tiled area, that I saw on the new Ghosts of Abyss site: http://disney.go.com/disneypictures/ghosts/flash/index.html?DETECT=SWF.5000000
is the first-class entrances on D-deck.

Ken Marschall and the team's new find of the wrought iron inner doors to the gangway doors also show the rest of the foyer's surrounds in CG version. Before the expedition, this area was thought to be covered with the same carpet as the Reception Room, as there were large openings like the archway and the wrought iron doors, that would allow the carpet to flow in the adjacent entrances. Looking at the CG picture now, it now seems that these vestibules were tiled in the same patterns as seen in the main stairway halls.

Parks, don't want to expand this topic here but... I bet the visual change of the wheelhouse floor woudn't proably be even noticed by ordinairy people watching the film and reading the book. And what seems to be the general concencus here and from your research is that the floor was tiled. I hope your view is put into fact. Also on Titanic, where wooden planks had previosly been today there is just lines of caulking. There seems to be no calking in the floor area of the remains of the wheel house. Just a thought.

By the way, love the CG version of the Marconi rooms. Those tiles are looking great.

All the best,

Nigel
 

Nigel Bryant

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Also by the way ,maybe Burgess and that other steward remebered that there was something different about Titanic's dinning saloon floor than Olympic's (eg colourwise). Maybe they both liked the dark blue, gold, and red more so than Olympic's alternative, so it was stamped in there meomory that something did differ, but in later years could not remember what it was so made a wild guess. Just food for thought.

All the best,

Nigel.
 

Bill Sauder

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Regarding improvements on Titanic, I have found that most of the “improvements” on Titanic vs. Olympic are either publicity spin, nostalgia, or lily-gilding. From all objective accounts, 99% of the Olympic and Titanic were interchangeable. In fact many of the fittings used for the new suites on Titanic’s B Deck were not new at all, but were “borrowed” from Holland American ships being built in 1911-12, hence those “New Dutch” and “Old Dutch” suites that everybody loves.

More important, the Britannic’s specification book calls for linoleum tiles in the dining room. If Titanic were carpeted throughout, it seems reasonable that Britannic would also be carpeted. In fact, the only important flooring upgrade that I know of for the trio was that the D Deck Reception Room on Britannic was to have been wooden parquet instead of carpet. (There are other differences, but this is the only one germane to the discussion).

Is it possible that carpet runners were used in the dining room? Yes, both Empress of Ireland used runners in her dining room, and Lusitania / Mauretania used them in first and second class extensively. However, in all cases, they are run down the most heavily trafficked parts of the room — never the wings — and I am not aware of runners showing up in any photos of the Dining Rooms for Olympic. Moreover, Burgess said carpeting, and that carries a different connotation than carpet runners, which were quite commonplace in 1912.

Bill Sauder
 
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Oct 17, 2002
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I know this thread is over 3 years old but I did have a question. I have seen a few Titanic exhibits in the last few years and was able to see a floor tile. I have to admit it does seem to be of a much greater quality than I think of in my childhood subdivision home. However, my question relates to the reason why linoleum was used. Was it a matter of weight? Tiles of ceramic or marble being too heavy, or was it a matter of inexpensive cost? Also, I wonder if linoleum was to be found in higher end homes of the period. I did some digging and of course found it was used, but seems to have been used in craftsman bungalow style homes. Not what I would consider higher end in 1912.

Also, on the matter of the carpeting. I believe the quote of sinking up to one's knees is just a yarn spinning. However, A pattern carpet over a pattern of linoleum (even one as complex as Titanic's) can be done without clashing and achieving a rather dashing and elegant look.
 
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Jul 9, 2000
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>>I believe the quote of sinking up to one's knees is just a yarn spinning.<<

It is yarn spinning to a point. There was quite a bit of carpet used but in this case, the reference was to the Dining Room. The Dining Room never had carpet and there were some very practical reasons for that, namely the splashy effects of sea sickness on an expensive rug. Linoleum isn't especially light but it's a lot easier to keep clean, and isn't easily ruined by the "Technicolour Yawn"
 
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In the homes, or should I say the plush mansions of the rich, I think carpet was preferred in that era. This was also the case for Titanic. Linoleum was used for practical reasons as Michael pointed out and in high-traffic areas. However, carpet was widely used and preferred in decorating Titanic's first class.

All 1st class cabins had carpet, and it was used to decorate such rooms as the Reading & Writing Room, Lounge, Reception room etc. Again for practical reasons, none of the Smoking Rooms used carpet, a rug yes, but not a full carpet.

After the war, all of Olympic's first class cabins had the carpet changed to linoleum and opted for runners instead. I'm not sure if this was done for practical reasons or the changing tastes post-war.

Daniel.
 
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sashka pozzetti

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Lino was very popular in 1912, because it was so easy to make, transport and lay. It is easy to clean, and maintain, and china doesn't automatically break when dropped on it. One of the reasons it was so popular is that they could print thousands of different patterns on it, and keep up with the latest trends. I used to have a house that had layers of original lino, some of it was printed exactly like a carpet, with immitation fuzzy squares, and a border. It was made in massive long sheets, and there is still the main factory for it that survives in Scotland. It has really tall thin rooms with long windows because of the way it was made. You can still buy it in tiles or rolls, and there is another version called marmoluem which has a squiggly pattern all over it. Because it is made from linseed oil I think it is apparently really 'green' too. When I was young they used to have it everywhere in hospitals and schools and places like that, and a man would buff it up every week with polish and a strange machine with a big rotating cloth thing underneath what looked like a hover-lawnmower It would go all shiny and reflect the walls.
 

Eric Longo

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Aug 13, 2004
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Hi All,

As the "lin" in lionleum is dried linseed or flax oil (linoxyn), I'd venture to say it was waterproof. Just a thought regarding its use(s).

Best,
Eric Longo
 
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sashka pozzetti

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I have used it in the bathroom, and yes it is completely waterproof.
 
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