Looking for a museum picture


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Kevin Saucier

Guest
A few years ago the Orlando SOD exhibit had a liquor cabinet made of oak from the wheelhouse door on display. It has since been disassembled. I am looking for anyone who possible has a picture of that cabinet.

All the obvious resources have been asked (previous owner, SOD curator) but there just seem to be a lack of any photographic evidence.

Many thanks!

Kevin
 

Steve Santini

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Nov 29, 2000
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This RARE cabinet has not been disaasembled.

I should know, we own it!

It is currently on display at the Branson museum.

Steve Santini / Titanic Concepts Inc.
 

Steve Santini

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Nov 29, 2000
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Yes, the wheelhouse door.

On her victim recovery mission, the Minia slavaged the floating wheelhouse door.

The door was made of oak and had a heavy, embossed bronze plaque affixed to it with the word "WHEELHOUSE".

William Parker, the Minia's carpenter, went on to take this door to pieces and make a liquor cabinet from the wood which was then given to James Adams, the Chief Officer of the Minia.

Adams died in a train/auto accident in the 1920's but his collection of Titanic items including the liquor cabinet and wheelhouse door plaque passed to his grandson, Gerald T. Mullin.

Mullin lived in British Columbia, Canada.

Mullin had allowed these and other Titanic items to be on display for a time at the Vancouver Maritime museum and this is how they came to my attention.

In the 1990's all of the Adams/Mullin items were sold to a handfull of private collectors.

Luckilly, we were able to acquire some of them.

We own the cabinet and a shelf made of Titanic wreckwood from inside the cabinet eventually went to Kevin Saucier.

The wheelhouse door plaque went to a private collector in the USA.

Steve Santini Titanic Concepts Inc.
 
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Kevin Saucier

Guest
Hi Steve, as always, nice to hear from you again!

Yes, of course the Wheelhouse cabinet is still around. My "disassembled" reference was simply meant for the shelf within. Seems I was careless in my wording and forgot to mention that. My apologies.

For those who may not have seen it, I hear the oak cabinet is exquisite. Steve has always done a great job with preserving and sharing his relics with the community. His book, "Titanic Touchstones of a Tragedy" is a perfect example.

Since my original post, I have obtained a somewhat blurry picture. If someone were to have a clear one, it would be greatly appreciated.

Kevin
 

Paul Lee

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Aug 11, 2003
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Very, veru interesting Steve, thank you for your information. Since the wheelhouse door was found floating on the surface it tends to destroy Pellegrino's assertion that the wheelhouse and bridge were demolished on the bottom.
 

Steve Santini

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Nov 29, 2000
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Hi Paul,

I have always held the belief that the 1st funnel likely crushed at least part of the bridge and wheelhouse when it fell.

The recovery of this door seems to support that possibility.

Steve Santini
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>The recovery of this door seems to support that possibility.<<

I would submit that the crushed condition of the starboard bridge wing bulwark tends to support that opinion as well. The stack may have been made of what was essentially sheet metal, but it was no lightweight. Anything in it's way would have suffered accordingly.
 
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Scott R. Andrews

Guest
"...The stack may have been made of what was essentially sheet metal, but it was no lightweight. Anything in it's way would have suffered accordingly...."

Mike,

I don't recall exactly where the number came from, but the figure of approximately 60 tons for one of these funnels sticks in my mind for some reason. This may seem like a lot for what is essentially a hollow, double-walled tube, but given the thickness of even the comparatively "thin" steel from which these structures were made, the weight adds up quickly, since even 1/4-inch thick steel sheet weighs in at about 10-1/2 lbs/sq.ft. Then, there's all of the internal stiffeners and distances pieces and so forth. Heck, next to one of the funnels, a Scotch boiler was a comparatively small fabrication and yet, due to the nature of the materials from which they were built, even one of the single-ended boilers tipped the scales at 57.38 long tons when empty!

Regards,
Scott Andrews
 
Jan 5, 2001
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That's interesting, Scott.

Captain Howarth stated that the funnels each weighed 35 tons. I believe this was while he was reading other technical figures from the registry book, which would tend to support the 35-ton figure. He gave it in testimony, at any rate, for Olympic. What do you make of it?

Best wishes,

Mark.
 
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Scott R. Andrews

Guest
Hi Mark,

Like I said, I don't recall where that number came from, but it stuck in my head. (And to be honest, this could have even been for one of the lower funnels within the casings, for all I can remember; these were made of thicker material and had internal baffle plates whereas the upper funnels did not.) The Good Captain's figure sounds more plausible to me, and given that he had the figures from the registry book in front of him, I would trust his figures far more than my memory. Still, 35 tons o' fun[nel] is nothing to laugh at when it's heading your way!

Regards,
Scott
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,604
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Easley South Carolina
>>I don't recall exactly where the number came from, but the figure of approximately 60 tons for one of these funnels sticks in my mind for some reason.<<

Sounds about right. Whatever the weight, it would make for one hell of a headache for anyone unfortunate enough to be in the way.
 

Steve Santini

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Nov 29, 2000
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I believe Astor's body was recovered partially crushed and covered with a great deal of soot.

In fact, the only way they could identify him was by his monogrammed belt buckle and what he had in his pockets.

Somewhere I seem to remember reading that Astor was likely crushed by a falling funnel. Perhaps he was in a position near the bridge when it happened.

Steve Santini
 
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Timothy Trower

Guest
The wheelhouse liquor cabinet is truly a thing of beauty. Not only is it in great shape, but it and several other items made from wood flotsam are on display at Titanic Branson ... and I for one am very grateful that Steve (and others) have made items from their collections available.

I've also heard that Astor's body was badly crushed and covered with soot. Since each of the funnels fell at some point during the Titanic's final moments, he could have been anywhere on the boat deck or water near the ship -- I don't know about his feelings, but I'd have rather been hit on the head with a funnel than freeze to death in that water.
 

Steve Santini

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Nov 29, 2000
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I guess with differing accounts one has to wonder.

Even if Astor was not crushed by a falling funnel, the recovery of Titanic's wheelhouse door does seem to suggest a massive degree of damage done to the bridge.

I am personally inclined to think it was caused by a falling funnel.

But, this is only my opinion.

Steve Santini
 
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Kevin Saucier

Guest
It's a bit grainy because it's from a copy of the SOD curators report in Orlando. What a great group! Thanks to Steve I also have a much better pic of the closed cabinet. I think the shelf is what William is interested in. Here you go.

118591.jpg
 
Jan 28, 2007
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Thanks Kevin,
I had a friend with a Paypal acct bid on your piece of shelf wood for me on ebay today.
Now lets hope I am the winner
happy.gif

William

I have deleted my signature as I was told politics were not allowed here but for some reason it remains. What gives, why isn't it gone.
 

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