Looking for survivor accounts


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John O'Malley

Guest
I've been doing research for personal reasons on those said to have been rescued from the water, and came across the "plucked from the sea" page. It has been a great help to me. However, there are several passengers listed on that page or in other sources who I have been unable to find accounts from them describing having been in the water. I was wondering if anyone would know where I could find accounts from the following people, as I would really like to read them:
Thure Lundstrom
James Avery (someone else on these boards said he may have been on collapsible B and I want to know why)
Eino Lindqvist
Thomas McCormack (I have read his accounts where he describes being rescued by the Murphy sisters or the McCoy sisters, but apparently he gave another account indicating he was on the overturned boat. Does anyone know where I can find it?)
William Tornquist
Carl Jonsson
Jack Stewart
Harold Phillimore
Eustace Snow
John O’Connor
William McIntyre
Charles Judd
A Hebb
Cecil Fitzpatrick (I have read a short account by him but hear that there is a longer one)
Ernest Allen
Albert Moss
Thomas Dillon (I’ve read his inquiry testimony, but apparently he gave another interview in which he claimed to have seen Robert Daniel jump from the stern. Does anyone know where I can find this? Also, on a related matter, does anyone know who the woman is who claimed Daniel was on Lifeboat 3 with her, and where I can find her interview)
John Thompson (according to this site he testified at the inquiry and gave some information as to the fate of William Small, but I went through the inquiry transcripts and was unable to find this)
Fang Lang
George Brereton
Charles Romaine
Nassef Albimona
Oskar Hedman
Ivan Jalsevac
Einar Karlsson
Nikola Lulic

I am also looking for more detailed accounts from Edward Dorking, Victor Sunderland and Patrick O’Keefe, who are said to have jumped overboard together. Also, is there anywhere I can read George Rheims April 20th New York Times Interview, besides directly from the paper? And finally, does anyone know where I can find the accounts by Oscar Olsson, Carl Jansson and August Wennerstrom in which they mention each other being on Collapsible A?

I realize that this is a big task to request, and that most of these people were probably not being entirely truthful, but I would like to read their accounts just out of curiosity. If they never gave any accounts, it would also be useful if anyone could identify the source that indicates they were in the water. Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

Dag Bertelsen

Member
Oct 10, 2010
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I have some weeks ago sent an email with the following biography on my grandfather Albert Moss, (however yet not published):

"Albert Johan Moss was born in Bergen Norway on December 14 1882 as one of six children of Eduard and Dorothea Moss. 16 years old he started his career a sailor. After a shipwreck outside Preston vest of England in December 1911, he was on his way to sign on as second mate at the Norwegian steamer “Norheim” in Philadelphia. On Titanic he shared a third class cabin at the E-deck with two more seamen also heading for “Norheim”. Struggling with collapsible B on board Titanic, he was swept overboard, but after some time in the cold water, he reached collapsible B and managed to climb up on it.

After two weeks at hospital in New York he continued to Philadelphia and on board “Norheim” as planned. Later on he was appointed captain at another Norwegian steamer “Nordkyn”. Despite Norway was not a part of WW1, “Nordkyn” was torpedoed outside Morocco. Albert and all the crew members managed to enter the lifeboats and reached a Moroccan town after three days.

Well home in Bergen he married his own niece Ingrid, the daughter of his elder brother Bernhard. He then had a ten year long pause from his seafaring life, and Ingrid and Albert got three children Gunvor, Egil, and Reidun; the latter later married to HÃ¥kon Bertelsen and got five children.

In 1930 Albert was back at sea in coal transport from Spitzbergen to Germany. This continued until 1941 when the coal steamers were transferred from Spitzbergen via Iceland to Scotland. Here he took over as a captain at S/S “Munin” in freight along the British coasts until June 1944. Then Albert and “Munin” were engaged in the freight of ammunition and other goods during the invasion in Normandy for the rest of WW2.

Eventually, in January 1946 he was allowed to return to Bergen and meet again with family and friends. There he lived a long and quite life as a pensioner together with Ingrid, children and grandchildren until his death on July 4. 1973. Although he gave some interviews to radio and newspapers, Albert did not like to speak about his experiences at sea, neither the Titanic disaster nor other of his sinister experiences."

For furteher information in English, please sea an article in Voyage 24 or the book "Titanic - 31 Norwegian desinies" by Per Kristian Sebak.

If anyone should be able to provide some information on the subsequent life for C. Fitzpatrick, James McGann og Eustace Snow, please let me know.
 
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John O'Malley

Guest
Thank you for the extra information. It sounds like your grandfather led a very interesting life. When do you expect your book will be out? I would be very interested in reading it. I wish you luck with your research.
 

Dag Bertelsen

Member
Oct 10, 2010
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I hope the Norwegian version of the book will be published before the end of 2011. I am not quite sure whether there will be enough interest for an English version, but the response so far may indicate that there is some interest. If, so I will need help to translate it, and even be a little more selective as to the content.

I think I will make a list of those who have expressed interest, and leave a message when the book is out.
 
Nov 11, 2005
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August Wennerstrom was washed of the decks Titanic while carrying 2-year-old Gosta Palsson whose mother had begged August to take. She had three other children with her. The two were washed off the deck by a large wave. August lost hold of Gosta and the child was drowned. August swam out to the boats and was taken aboard one of the collapsible A.

"All the feeling had left us. If we wanted to know if we still had legs (or any other part) left, we had to feel down in the water with our hand. The only exercise we got was when someone gave up hope and died, whom we immediately threw overboard to give the live ones a little more space and at the same time lighten the weight of the boat"
(Courtesy of ET)

Hildur Panula-Heinonen
 
Nov 11, 2005
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Eino Lindqvist was saved i lifeboat #15, and his thus not set a foot in the water. His description of being denied entry, thrown in the water and having climbed aboard collapsible A is untrue.

Hildur Panula-Heinonen
 
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John O'Malley

Guest
Sorry it has taken so long to reply, but do you know where I could find the accounts from Wennerstrom and Lindqvist which you describe? Such as the newspaper and date, or whatever. I am looking to read their accounts for myself.

Also, what is the source for placing Lindqvist in Lifeboat 15? Thank you.
 
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John O'Malley

Guest
Thank you for the information. Have you read the book by any chance?

If so, how much information does it have in regards to his experiences (and those of anyone else) on the night of the sinking.
 

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