Lost Worlds Building the Titanic Wednesday History Channel


Nov 26, 2005
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Not sure if I've ever heard of or seen this. I didn't see a thread for it so I thought I'd post it and let you all know if you're interested.
 
Nov 26, 2005
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Did anyone catch this?

We already know pretty much, if not all, what the program covered but it was still a decent and, imo, well put-together documentary on the background and building of the shipyard and Titanic herself.
 
Nov 26, 2005
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I did enjoy seeing that (the Nomadic) and the tour of the White Swan Hotel was also a nice touch. Seeing the personal details like the music note lightly carved into the lounge woodwork was a treat.
 
Jan 29, 2001
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I watched the telecast lastnight...as a matter of fact twice!

What I found particulary enjoying...the OLYMPIC interior fittings of the WHITE SWAN location...seen up-close. To this day, I am still taken aback with the attention to detail.
"In Belfast they did'nt do things in half" (A quote from the telecast) The *last* survivng section of the OLYMPIC's grand-staircase is always a show-stopper. And then you had the rivet heads, still prominently apparant at the gantry site. Yet...most of all it was the sadness of the derelict cranes (used in T's const.) which touched home the most.

Albeit...the wreck footage was minor...the clarity was tops.

In closing, another quote from the telecast...
"A brilliant job by her workmen."

...I concur...

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 

Will C. White

Member
Apr 18, 2007
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Liked the show, but it was a half hour doc. in a one hour slot-note how many times the same footage was used in places as "padding". That seems to be a common production cost cutting measure these days. Could have used some diary excerpts or perhaps interviewed a few children of the workman who built Titanic that are still around and have memories. Stunning woodwork-my grandfather was a union hall carpenter (back when it really meant something) and he was an excellent craftsman and always proud of his craft. Very interesting that Ismay was not mentioned-those ship's weren't built on "spec"!
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
It could have been worse but it certainly could have been better. I didn't pay excruciatingly close attention to it but I would take issue with the claim made that Harland & Wolff never attempted anything on that scale again or that the shipyards fortunes declined after the Titanic.

Harland & Wolff remained a viable and successful concern and even if they didn't use the same slips for the work, they continued to build large ships and plenty of them ranging from liners (The Canberra for example) and aircraft carriers. While the concern is not what it was, the same economic changes which ultimately killed their shipbuilding business did in a large portion of the shipbuilding industry throughout the U.K.

At least they're still around, and that's a helluva lot more then can be said about a lot of their competitors.
 
May 27, 2007
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I caught the show and thought it was informative and fun.

Will((Liked the show, but it was a half hour doc. in a one hour slot-note how many times the same footage was used in places as "padding".))

Will the History Channel is notorious for repeating footage. I guess their just a bit loopy.
lame.gif


All said I liked it and found it informative on the Harland & Wolff Shipbuilders and what they had to go though in the building of The RMS Titanic. Those Boys really had it hard back in the day. Only one bathroom break a day and only 7 minutes to do it in and lets not forget those 14 hour work days. Thank God for unions and better working conditions.
 
Jan 29, 2001
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Agreed. the computer graphics of the grand staircase were frequented often. What else I enjoyed, however not enough time was spared for the segment...the TITANIC & OLYMPIC memorabilia presented. I did note an original copy of the T & O shipbuilder publication. My copy is of the '70's republication.

In closing, I could not agree more with yet another quote from the episode..."Most notorius incident in maritime history".

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
Apr 13, 2006
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Chiming in late on this one too. I really enjoyed this one. The insight into the building of the ship and the actual dock as it appears today was fascinating.

I was in NYC this past Spring and was taken by the dock (Pier 54) near to where the Titanic would have pulled in. It's too bad the White Star sign which is still visible has faded and the arch practically rotted away. I'm surprised somebody hasn't spent some money to make this a landmark. There is the memorial lighthouse a little distance from there at the South Street Seaport.

Leen
 

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