Lucy Noël Martha Countess of Rothes

C

chris anthony

Guest
Hello. I am fairly new to the message board, but I enjoy learning about Titanic and drawing passengers. Currently, i am working on a drawing of the Countess of Rothes. Does anybody have any suggestions of what the Countess should be doing in the picture? I have already drawn her head, but I am trying to figure what the Countess could be doing in the picture. Any suggestions would be incredibly helpful.
Thanks.
-Chris
 
C

chris anthony

Guest
That's a great idea. Your suggestion is much appreciated!
 
C

chris anthony

Guest
any suggestions on what she might be doing while her trip on Titanic?
Thanks
 
Sep 1, 2004
381
0
86
I know that she was listeting music in lounge (I think it was lounge. Maybe reception room on D-deck) and identifying Hoffmann's tales from Jacques Offenbach (orechestra's music). And there is also a photo of Countess by boat No.8 davit - photographed by Father Brown.
 
C

chris anthony

Guest
Would you happen to know who she was with in the lounge/reception room? But thank you for your help.

Chris
 
May 1, 2004
264
2
148
60
Pacifique du Nord
I know that she was listeting music in lounge (I think it was lounge. Maybe reception room on D-deck) and identifying Hoffmann's tales from Jacques Offenbach (orechestra's music). And there is also a photo of Countess by boat No.8 davit - photographed by Father Brown.
Maybe when I'm growed up I'll post a spanking new thread. Until then I shall lurk on the coattails of those with more guts than I,..
One thing that's recurring is that PTSD wasn't known in 1912. However, when the Countess heard The Tales of Hoffman a year later whilst dining out she was overcome with the, "sense of cold and intense horror associated with the sinking." Lawrence Beesley was by all accounts unaffected but when visiting the seashore he would face away from the water. Also, later in life, if the subject of the tragedy arose he would leave the room and display signs of agitation.
I was telling my father about PTSD as it relates to the sinking. I told him I think there was lots of 'survivor's guilt', and actual shame, to have survived when so many perished. & that it wasn't talked about, if one was a survivor. In fact I believe survivors kept it to themselves. It seems only Molly Brown dined out on the sinking.
Another thing wot (sic) occurred to me that I shared with my dad was why anybody would book an inside stateroom. Then, like a flash, it hit me: the ocean isn't pretty, esp. the North Atlantic. Read Arnold Bennett's account of sailing to Noo Yawk on RMS Lusitania in 1912; there seems to be an underlying unease about it (The Arnold Bennett Blog: Exploring 'Lucy'). I was telling my dad that before the 1950s, if you wished to travel from Europe to North America, you took a boat. But, just as the fear of flying exists, there was palpable fear of sailing across the North Atlantic. Esp. after the Titanic went down; all the lifeboats in the world wouldn't have given me a shred of confidence if I'd harboured a fear of sailing the North Atlantic. So, an inside stateroom meant you could conceivably avoid looking at the surface of the sea for the entire voyage.