Lucy Violet Snape

A

Andrew Williams

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Richard, the news report mentions that Lucy had a child, but obviously the child wasn't with her - she was working as a crew member, not travelling as a passenger.

The Relief Fund note shows that Margaret was listed as a person who relied on the income of a victim, and therefore qualified for regular financial support from the fund - generally paid weekly - until she was old enough to support herself. Also confirms that she was not herself a victim, in case you still have any doubts about that. :)

The photo is on the full biography page. What you have seen so far is probably Lucy's summary page - look towards the bottom of that page for a 'Discover more' link to the full page.
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Once she reached 18 years of age, she would've been given two options - 1st if she was interested in taking up an apprenticeship the Fund would set aside a Grant and pay until the final year of apprenticeship finished. 2nd - Failing that, if she refused she was removed from the Fund on a permanent basis. Actually something else, her Father died a year beforehand and is buried out in China.
 

Charles

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Snape was 2nd class with Walsh, Wallis was Steerage, and the rest of the stewardesses worked in 1st Class.

When Matron Wallis said that quote in staying in her cabin, I believed that at one point, she would've made an evacuation

Also, according to the E Deck plans, at the Stewardess' cabin in the main staircase in Second Class, there is one set of bunk beds (probably one for Catherine Walsh and one for Lucy Snape). Stewardess Catherine Wallis had a cabin on the same deck in Section Q (the aft Steerage cabins)

Also, its the annversary of the 9/11 attacks (Rest in Peace to the heroes that morning)
 

Bob Godfrey

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There were 4 (not just 2) stewardesses to serve the 2nd Class passengers - Snape, Walsh, Bliss and Lavington. To accommodate them there were two stewardess cabins in the 2nd Class area - the second was on F deck. You'll find it amid the toilet blocks almost immediately underneath the E deck cabin already mentioned.
 

Charles

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There were 4 (not just 2) stewardesses to serve the 2nd Class passengers - Snape, Walsh, Bliss and Lavington. To accommodate them there were two stewardess cabins in the 2nd Class area - the second was on F deck. You'll find it amid the toilet blocks almost immediately underneath the E deck cabin already mentioned.
Thank you for the information

First Class Stewardesses-

Sara Stap
Violet Jessop
Annie Robinson
Alice Prichard
Maude Slocombe (Turkish Bath Masseuse)
Annie Caton (Turkish Bath Attendant, any difference???)
Mabel Martin (Restaurant Cashier)
Ruth Bowker (Restaurant Cashier)
Evelyn Marsden
Mary Sloan
Mabel Bennett
Hypatia McLauren
Jane Gold
Annie Martin
Mary Roberts
Elizabeth Leather
Katherine Smith
Mary Gregson


Second Class Stewardesses-

Elizabeth Lavington
Emma Bliss
Lucy Snape
Catherine Walsh

Steerage Stewardesses-

Catherine Wallis (Matron)
 

Bob Godfrey

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The two cashjers were not stewardesses. They were hired and paid by Gatti as part of his restaurant staff, and were paid considerably more than any stewardess.

I would also advise you not to refer to the Titanic's 3rd Class as 'steerage'. The German liners of the day offered both 3rd Class AND Steerage accommodation, and if you could have sampled both you'd soon see the difference. Back in 1912 some legal classifications lumped them both together or described 3rd Class as 'new steerage', but 3rd Class was in reality a vast improvement, much closer to 2nd Class than to traditional steerage.
 

Charles

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I got Cashiers Bowker and Martin from the "Identifying Stewardesses" page (even though they weren't saloon stewardesses of any kind

For the 'Steerage' term, the definition is-
noun
noun: steerage
  1. 1.
    historical
    the part of a ship providing accommodations for passengers with the cheapest tickets.
Since Third Class was the cheapest on Titanic, why couldn't it be called Steerage (my Polish ancestors sailed on the North German Lloyd Ship SS Leipzig, which Second Class was the cheapest (and thus Steerage). It just depends on how many classes on a ship
 

Bob Godfrey

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The Leipzig crossing would have been around 40 years earlier? When steerage really was steerage. The only other option would have been Cabin (ie 1st) Class - so called because it offered individual cabins and facilities like a lounge and dining room, whereas the steerage passengers slept and ate in a dormitory in the bottom of the ship, where the steering gear and stores were located. I've seen no manifest for the ship that mentions 2nd Class.

Coming forward to 1912, if you really believe that steerage and 3rd Class were the same thing you should read the accounts of Edwardian travelers, and especially the reports compiled for the US Immigration authorities. They distinguished between 'old steerage' (as on the Leipzig) which still existed with all its horrors, 'new steerage' which was a great improvement, and the recent introduction of 3rd Class, which was very close in quality to 2nd Class and better than 1st Class would have been back in the time of the Leipzig. It was still fairly common for cabin class passengers and even crew to refer to 3rd Class as 'steerage', but that was innaccurate and unfair.
 
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Charles

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I'm sorry to bring back this thread, but I have a possible theory to why Walsh and Snake died.

Since Walsh served on F-Deck (based on Serena Cook) she probably had the F-Deck cabin. During the sinking, she probably along with the stewards, roused people up and guided them in the evacuation in the stairwells.

I believe they died because they refused to leave with some of their passengers still on board (maybe Bliss and Lovington survived because all of their women (or they thought) were in the boats.

From the launching of lifeboat 15 they either went up to the stern to comfort the passengers, or went to check the rest of second class. Either way their bodies weren't recovered.