Lusitania Memorials

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Terry Binns

Member
If anyone is in Cobh (great place),looking for Lusitania memorabilia go to the museum,it is in the old Church of Scotland on the left at the top of the hill as you drop down into Cobh. there you can see the Log of the German Sub.and other interesting facts.
 
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Peter Kelly

Member
Hi All,

I have just got word that plans are well advanced on this years commemoration ceremony to be held at the memorial at the Old Head of Kinsale.

Proceedings commence at 3pm on Saturday, May 7th, and any of you who wish to attend will be more than welcome.

Due to the fact that this is the 90th anniversary of the sinking of the Lusitania, a special effort is being made to make this an especially memorable occasion.

Any one who requires further details can contact me or post here.

Regards,

Peter
 
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Iain Stuart Yardley

Member
I'm going to miss it by five weeks! Bugger! We'll be in Cobh this coming weekend. Really looking forward to it.

Cheers,

Boz
 
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Peter Kelly

Member
Hi Boz,

I hope all goes well on your trip to Cobh this weekend and that you have your itinerary planned out to maximise your time there.

Perhaps you might get a cheap flight in early May and we might see you at the Old Head of Kinsale after all???

Regards,

Peter
 
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Senan Molony

Member
So, time is running out... anyone going to the 90th Anniversary commemorations? (unfortunately I will probably be pacing the corridor of a maternity ward at the time...)

Boz, did you go to Cobh?

Inger wrote earlier:

think the Cobh memorial to the Lusitania is one of the best commemorative statues for a maritime tragedy I've seen anywhere. Rather than an ethereal creature that is too divine to have a touch of the human, even in mourning, she is earthy, real and poignant. The statues that flank her are extraordinarily expressive of the anguish and grief of the people who tried to rescue the survivors.

This is very perspicacious of you, Ing.

The memorial has suffered many indignities, but it is regarded as an absolute masterpiece by many, including some of sculpture's most cultured cognoscenti.

Jerome Connor's work has been officially compared, by former curator Domhnall O'Murchada, to Michaelangelo's David.

That might be an exaggeration, if so, it is not an altogether wild one, as the realised vision is one of real pathos and empathy.

Perhaps it is ironically its very central location that leads people to throw it only a cursory glance - as if it were just another piece of civic furniture.

Connor, incidentally, would have preferred not to have had an Angel. The American funding committee insisted on it.
 
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Peter Kelly

Member
Plans are well advanced for the ceremony at the Old Head of Kinsale. I can not comment on any of the others, if there are any?

Peter
 
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Jim Kalafus

Member
>I can not comment on any of the others, if there are any?

If you are in the neighborhood of Madison and East 50th, feel free to drop in, Peter
Happy
but, as I recall you have other plans....
 
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Geoff Whitfield

Member
The annual Liverpool ceremony, held at the ship's propellor, will take place Saturday 7th May, although it appears to be very low key considering it's a major anniversary.
 
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Iain Stuart Yardley

Member
Morning all,

We arrived at Ringaskiddy, outside Cork, on Good Friday morning, delayed off Roche's Point due to thick fog. The journey across from Swansea via the MV Superferry was a nightmare of Poseidon Adventure proportions. Well, not quite, but I had about half an hour's sleep through the night owing to the precarious angles, creaks and groans the ship was being pitched and rolled to. Having a cabin that overlooked the fo'cs'le just under the bridge probably didn't help as we were right at the front, whereas I assume it would have been gentler midships. All night I couldn't get the image of the Estonia out of my head and imagined having to run down the corridor in half-darkness, with just me underpants on, in a vain attempt to get to a lifeboat.

We then took a train from Cork into Cobh, arriving at about 11-ish (Michael Martin's Titanic Trail was about to depart). Our room wasn't ready at the Commodore Hotel, overlooking Cobh harbour and furthermore, there was a pre-planned power cut throughout the whole island. Some essential electrical maintenance work was being carried out and power went out at 3am that morning and was due to return by 4pm (it eventually came on again at 5.50pm) (10 mins after I finished a cold shower as I couldn't wait any longer). So we decided to visit the Lusitania graves first.

A walk to the top of the town and then down the hill the other side and we were at the graveyard.
It appears new grave markers have been added to the corner of the cemetary holding the Lusitania victims, most of them with naval connections that we were told wouldn't have been possible before the Peace Agreement.

Despite the lack of power in the main town, SuperValu, which is a new supermarket build on a field adjoining the sports pitch across the road from the graveyard, was thriving. Which was good because we were starving and had no cash. Thankfully the cashpoint was working and the cafe was open.

Then we were back in town for a visit to a few pubs. Except none were open - officially, that is. Being Good Friday in Ireland no pubs were supposed to be open. Is this law or a religous observance? Anyway, that's when I went back to the room to have a cold shower. We did get a drink but we were led down to a dark and dank underground room with a long, empty bar except for a barman and lone customer. We had two pints apiece and decided we'd have a meal at the hotel and then have an early night as we'd had very little sleep the night before.

The next day we embarked on Michael Martin's walking tour of Cobh on his Titanic Trail. We'd passed many of the sites he pointed out, the day before, and it was interesting to hear why they were included on the trail. Having heard that the Titanic wasn't visible from the town because it was anchored some way out at Roche's Point, I was intrigued to learn that the Titanic was, in fact, visible from several locations within Cobh. albeit not from the central area istself. We were told that once the tenders had left the White Star Line pier with 123 passengers, friends and relatives of those about to leave Ireland made their way to these vantage points and waved their last goodbyes.

That afternoon, knowing we couldn't go very far because of the train and ferry schedules, we settled for lunch at one of the tables slung out in front of the Commodore. Then we trudged our way back to the station, back to Cork and Ringaskiddy and home.

A very enjoyable time was had and we learned a few tidbits to add to the Titanic story.

I'd love to go back to Irealnd to coincide with the Lusitania ceremony but I've been roped into seeing Maria Stuarda in Wolverhampton, of all places.

Cheers,

Boz
 
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Peter Kelly

Member
Hi Boz,

Once ever, and only once, did I travel on the Swansea/Cork "Superferry. It was an awful experience, and once was more than enough times to suffer through the horror of it. There are no stabalizers on that vessel and she pitches and rolls in the calmest of weather.

In relation to the pubs, by law, there are two days in the year when pubs are supposed to stay closed in Ireland - Good Friday and Christmas Day. There are exceptions for residents of hotels, club members, rail & air passengers, and a few others. I will not bore you with the details, but that is the law.

In relation to the grave stones, I do not think the peace process has anything to do with them. I am familiar with the markers you mention, and these are a standard type erected by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission throughout the world. As a general rule cemeteries and individual graves are respected in Ireland, regardless of religious, ethnic or nationality issues. There are many similar grave stones in cemeteries throughout Ireland, marking the graves of Irish men and women who served in the British Armed Forces, especially during both World Wars. Desecration of graves is condemned by all, including the various "former" para-military organizations.

I am glad you enjoyed your visit to Cobh, and I look forward to seeing you sometime at a Lusitania ceremony, or otherwise.

Regards,

Peter
 
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Iain Stuart Yardley

Member
Peter,

You're absolutely correct in calling the Superferry a "horror". Never have I had such a disturbing journey. I can only liken it to a prelude to a disaster movie. You have all the signs of what's to come - glasses sliding off tables, people lurching forward, backwards and sideways, banging into walls and falling over everyone, bottles rattling like mad on the shelves in the bar, the sea crashing over the bow, cupboard doors and drawers flying open, pale-faced and worried looking crew pressing themselves up against the wall in terror. Oh yes, it was all there. An experience which I don't think I'll be repeating anytime soon.

Cheers,

Boz
 
Mike Poirier

Mike Poirier

Member
We are kind of slackers here in the US- no official memorials planned. Though I may visit the grave of survivor Elizabeth Hampshire which is 5 miles from my house.
 
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Tom Lear

Member
Would there be anything in the news or media? I wonder what notice there was in 1980 on the 75th anniversary, if any........
 
Mike Poirier

Mike Poirier

Member
Hi Tom
Will be catching up with you in a few days to finish up where we left off. There were anniversary articles where home town papers would round up local survivors. Of course not to the extent as they did with Titanic survivors, but there were some.
 
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