LusitaniaMauretania deck plans


Jim Kalafus

Member
Dec 3, 2000
6,113
26
298
Is there anything in particular for which you are looking? I have a partial one from 1915 which shows everything down to the placement of the furniture. It is missing the First Class section of C Deck. They belong to a researcher friend of mine and so I can't post them in their entirety but if there is anything specific for which you are looking I might be able to help out. One oddity of the Lusitania was that the largest cabins on board were not in first class, but were a pair of second class cabins, and that the absolute smallest cabins on board WERE in first class- an odd set of triangular cabins shoehorned into leftover space around the cut out for the dome so small that there was literally only room for a berth and 3/4 of a sofa.
 
L

laurent Gontier-Versailles

Guest
Hi Bert ,
You can order all the Lusitania plans where they are kept , in the GUAS ( Glasgow University Archives Services ).
The whole archives from the John Brown shipyard , Clydebank , are available there also.
Be aware that they are really pricy , I ordered five sheet of these plans 2 years ago and they costed me 103 UK£ ( 160 euros/USD )
There is the link :
www.archives.gla.ac.uk
Hope you've been helped
Laurent
 
B

Bert Savels

Guest
Jim, can you get me the half section please, so I can compare it with the one of the titanic. It would be a great help.
 

Eric Sauder

Member
Nov 12, 2000
403
14
171
Jim wrote: "the absolute smallest cabins on board [Lusitania] WERE in first class- an odd set of triangular cabins shoehorned into leftover space around the cut out for the dome so small that there was literally only room for a berth and 3/4 of a sofa."

The only explanation that makes sense to me about those cabins is that they were intended for use as servants' quarters for the Parlour Suites and En Suite Rooms across the corridor. B-79, B-80, B-81, B-82, B-83, and B-84 are so small that it's hard to believe they were not designed with being servant's quarters in mind. B-81 was only 36 sq ft; and B-83 was a mere 29 sq ft.

In the early years, these small cabins were listed on the passenger rate schedule. Later, however, they were removed and not sold officially as passenger cabins. It seems likely, though, that they would be sold as passenger acommodations if first class were booked to capacity (which apparently was often the case) and if they were not occupied by servants.

I believe that B-45 and B-46 were also used as servant's quarters for the Regal Suites at least in 1914. My early deck plans and rate notes are not at hand at the moment; so I can't comment on earlier years, but in 1914, they were not being sold as passenger cabins.

Eric Sauder

59415.png
 

Eric Sauder

Member
Nov 12, 2000
403
14
171
As for the two second-class cabins Jim mentioned, here they are.

59418.png


Jim wrote: "One oddity of the Lusitania was that the largest cabins on board were not in first class, but were a pair of second class cabins...."

They weren't actually the largest cabins on board. The largest ones were indeed in first class. They are the Dining Rooms to the Regal Suites. They measured 13' 3" x 12' (approx. 159 sq. ft.). The next largest was first-class cabin D-26 at 14' x 10' 9" (approx. 150 1/2 sq. ft.). Then came the second-class cabins C-11 and C-12 at 12' x 11' 6" (approx. 138 sq. ft.).

I have always been surprised by the size of these two second-class staterooms, though. Massive amounts of space compared to any other second-class cabin.

Eric Sauder
 
May 12, 2005
3,107
20
233
Eric,

You're more than a help.

One question -- above you wrote: "...In the early years these small cabins were listed on the passenger rate schedule. Later however they were removed and not sold officially as passenger cabins..."

So am I following that ultimately these cabins were maybe being used as overflow space for passenger baggage? Or even considered perhaps as a package deal for passengers booked into the Regal Suites?

Randy
 
R

Richard Coplen

Guest
What did the numbers "1" and "2" stand for on what i presume are the beds in the cabins on the deck-plans????
 

Eric Sauder

Member
Nov 12, 2000
403
14
171
Randy: Sorry. I should have been more specific. When I said the cabins were "removed," what I meant was removed from the rate schedule. As far as I know, the cabins themselves were left intact, and used as maids' quarters or overflow first-class cabins when first class was fully booked. I doubt that they would have been used for overflow baggage because of the potential damage to the cabin fittings in rough weather.

The passage fare for maids and valets was not included in the price of the suite. The rate for servants was "the winter minimum fares." The deck plan goes on the say that "suitable berths will be provided." It is also possible, and very likely probable, that servants were accommodated in second class if first class were booked to capacity.

Richard: The numbers "1" and "2" stand for berth numbers. This was a time when it was not uncommon at all for passengers to share their cabins with strangers. Each person was assigned a specific berth at time of booking -- first come, first served. This prevented any disagreement upon boarding between strangers sharing a stateroom about who would sleep in what bed. Odd numbered berths are uppers, and even numbers designate lower berths.

By the way, on original deck plans issued at the time to the public, stateroom numbers were shown in red, and berth numbers were in black.

Eric Sauder
 

Shane Worthy

Member
Aug 12, 2004
227
2
111
Eric,
I have been told that B-81 was one of the large outside rooms, more like 81 sq. feet, not 36. Can you help clarify this misunderstanding and point me in the right direction for the cabin's occupants.
Thank you for your help,
Shane N. Worthy
All Ahead Full!
 
Dec 6, 2000
1,480
3
221
Shane,

As posted by Eric, B-81 on the Lusitania was a small inside cabin of some 36 square feet, but your original post was under: Cabin Numbers: What was the Ryersons real cabin? I posted to that thread with a deck plan. Just click onto the: B-81.bmp

and you can see that on the Titanic B-81 was a large outside room and that the small inside rooms were about 81 square feet.
 

Similar threads

Similar threads