Lusitania's public rooms during sinking


Oct 28, 2004
2
0
131
Hello everyone! I hope everyone has had a good 2007 so far.
I'm sorry if this has already been asked, I couldn't find it in the boards...
As the Lusitania sank, how do you think the public rooms were flooded? For example, on the first class lounge, smoking room grand entrance, and reading room was there even flooding, or might the domes have been imploded by the water pressure as the sea came crashing in, similar to the Titanic's grand staircase? It's so sad to even think about the lounge's roof crashing down ;)...
Anyways, that was my question, just curious to hear some opinions.
Everyone have a great day!

René
 
B

Brian R Peterson

Guest
Hi Rene,

Considering the stained glass over the First Class Lounge and Smoking Rooms were considerably larger than those on Titanic, and were more squared off, they may have held up a bit better than the circular glass panels, but in the end I do believe the weight and force of the water pouring over the decks as she sank would have exploded the windows, however in the slight chance they survived the sinking and went down intact, the depth charges the navy used on the wreck would have blown them out.

Best Regards,

Brian
 
B

Brian O'Dell

Guest
I don't think the dome in the Lounge crashed in with water. It was only suited with bulbs and no raised glass roof on deck like Titanic. The domes onboard Lusitania were well protected. I know the Smoking Room wall imploded with water. And a cabin, i'm not sure which one. It said in my book the 1st Class Dining Room dome was made of plaster, not glass, so I doubt if that dome caved in. All I know is the water started flooding the Dining Room through the left door on the bottom deck of the Dining Room, Foward. Also the Reading & Writing Room didn't flood. The water covered the windows and a few seconds later, BOOM! In my book I have all of this info. The domes didn't cave in until the water reached the dome where it meets the ceiling. Ecxept the water wouldn't come out of the domes. The water would go in. The windows on the walls probably imploded, though. In my book, no domes imploded. Apparentley.
 
May 3, 2002
799
27
193
59
Wellington, New Zealand
Brian,
just to clarity when you say "in my book" are youa actually ferring to a book and if so which one please or do you mean the same as "in my view"?

You are putting forward new information to me and if this is a book, I would very much like to be able to read more of it.

many thanks

Martin
 

Charles

Member
May 30, 1999
179
3
263
USA
I disagree with the first class dining room flooding, because compared to Titanic's sinking , Lusitania sank faster, so the windows in the dining room would have probably allowed more water in, but the dome I believe remained intact, as it was not on the boat deck or one of those upper decks where the water could have easily entered in.
 

Charles

Member
May 30, 1999
179
3
263
USA
My other proof is that 2 first class passengers that were in laws, I forgot their names, had cabins on E Deck, and one , Dr. Howard something, went to fetch life belts, but then he saw that water was up to D Deck, and was rising quickly, so he searched the cabins forward of that staircase. The first class dining room was located on both D and C Decks, so it's lower level was probably flooding rapidly. He was probably a witness of it flooding!
 

Auden G Minor

I am a Titanic enthusiest!
Member
Sep 8, 2020
67
53
38
My other proof is that 2 first class passengers that were in laws, I forgot their names, had cabins on E Deck, and one , Dr. Howard something, went to fetch life belts, but then he saw that water was up to D Deck, and was rising quickly, so he searched the cabins forward of that staircase. The first class dining room was located on both D and C Decks, so it's lower level was probably flooding rapidly. He was probably a witness of it flooding!
I do believe you but you could use more information like windows were being opened. I don't know if the reading room's windows could be opened but if they could have been they probably were open. Knowing it was pretty warm and passengers opening their respective dining area's windows. Since that is the case I would believe that portholes would be opened.
 

Similar threads

Similar threads