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I know that this isn't as important as the survival of the passengers and crew and that it wouldn't have been top of their priorities but was there any attempt to save the mail stored on the Titanic? And was any mail saved?

There could have been some really important letters on the Titanic from families in England.
 
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As far as I know, the only mail that survived from the Titanic was anything sent off from the ship that was then offloaded at Cherbourg and Queenstown. If it was on the ship when she left Queenstown, then it's still there.
 
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Lol!

Thanks Michael, that's what I thought. In that case, could the officers and crew members send wireless messages to their rellies from the Titanic or was that frowned upon?

Christa.
 
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I can't think of any reason why they couldn't have had any of them wanted to. I don't know that many of them would be able to afford it though. Wireless then was a commercial operation and a tad expensive.
 

Dave Gittins

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Another point is that 1912 was not 2003. The modern obsession with communication was not part of it. Sailors were used to being out of touch for weeks and even months at a time. Some sent last minute letters from port before sailing and after that they were not heard of. Relatives lived with knowing that anything might happen to them.

As Michael mentioned, Marconigrams were expensive. The charge was 12 shillings and sixpence for the first ten words. Seamen were paid 3 shillings and fourpence per day and even the junior officers only got about twice that figure.
 
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Thanks guys, it's hard to switch my mind back and forth between 2003 and 1912.

And I didn't even contemplate the cost! That's about half a week's pay for a seaman!
 
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>>And I didn't even contemplate the cost! That's about half a week's pay for a seaman!<<

Well, about four and a half days anyway, but close enough. The post was definately cheaper and had no word restrictions. An important consideration when one lived literally on a day to day basis.
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Dave Gittins

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Christa, we older blokes have an advantage in that we have lived in conditions not all that far from 1912. In the years after WW II, telegrams were sent only on very special occasions and often brought bad news, such as a death in the family. Cost was still a factor. Many homes had no telephone. For years, we had no radio. We even used pounds, shillings and pence! All this is handy when working on Titanic. Personally, I can live without speaking to anybody for days. I think my record is about eight days, while cruising the SA coast. How many of the mobile phone generation have done that?
 
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Jake Angus

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Think of using wireless on the Titanic in terms of using airphones on commercial airliners today: you're gonna be there in a little while, so unless it's an emergency, sit back and enjoy the movie.
 
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>Personally, I can live without speaking to anybody for days. I think my record is about eight days, while cruising the SA coast. How many of the mobile phone generation have done that?<

Well, I'm the one my friends always complain about not having my mobile with me. But even I come back to it after a week or so!

Thanks for giving this topic a modern spin, Jake. Rather than just thinking 'they didn't use the telegrams' I can relate to why.

All of you have been a great help, thanks!

When did they start having telephones and radios? Just think, if you wanted to go visiting you couldn't ring them up before hand to check that they'd be in!

Christa.
 
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