Question Man overboard procedure


Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
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NewtonMearns, Glasgow, Scotland.
As you possibly know, Titanic was very well prepared for such an event.
There was a Quartermaster stationed 24/7 at the stern. One of his duties was to keep a lookout for anyone falling overboard and to report such a thing to the bridge using the telephone on the aft docking bridge. At the same time, he would note the patent log reading.
In addition to the QM aft, Titanic had 2 emergency cutters. These were located - one each side at the forward end of the boat deck designated: No.1 starboard and No.2, port.
While at sea, the cutters were deployed outboard, over the side, and ready for immediate launch. A lit lamp was placed in each boat every evening. In the event of an emergency, they would be manned by a junior officer and select crew.
When someone fell overboard, the a life-buoy would immediately be thrown over the side on which the person fell. The engines would be stopped then the ship turned short-round and steamed dead slow back on the reverse course. During this time the emergency boat crew would be called to stations and the boats manned ready for launching. At the same time, and in day light, extra lookouts would be posted. As son as the casualty was sighted, or the last known location of the casualty was reached, the boat would, be launched and hopefully successful rescue would be accomplished and boat and survivor recovered on board.

Hope this helps.
 
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John Stassek

Member
Feb 11, 2018
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As you possibly know, Titanic was very well prepared for such an event.
There was a Quartermaster stationed 24/7 at the stern. One of his duties was to keep a lookout for anyone falling overboard and to report such a thing to the bridge using the telephone on the aft docking bridge. At the same time, he would note the patent log reading.
In addition to the QM aft, Titanic had 2 emergency cutters. These were located - one each side at the forward end of the boat deck designated: No.1 starboard and No.2, port.
While at sea, the cutters were deployed outboard, over the side, and ready for immediate launch. A lit lamp was placed in each boat every evening. In the event of an emergency, they would be manned by a junior officer and select crew.
When someone fell overboard, the a life-buoy would immediately be thrown over the side on which the person fell. The engines would be stopped then the ship turned short-round and steamed dead slow back on the reverse course. During this time the emergency boat crew would be called to stations and the boats manned ready for launching. At the same time, and in day light, extra lookouts would be posted. As son as the casualty was sighted, or the last known location of the casualty was reached, the boat would, be launched and hopefully successful rescue would be accomplished and boat and survivor recovered on board.

Hope this helps.
Thank you Jim,
I did not know. You've told me exactly what I was looking for.
 
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george harris

Member
May 11, 2018
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As you possibly know, Titanic was very well prepared for such an event.
There was a Quartermaster stationed 24/7 at the stern. One of his duties was to keep a lookout for anyone falling overboard and to report such a thing to the bridge using the telephone on the aft docking bridge. At the same time, he would note the patent log reading.
In addition to the QM aft, Titanic had 2 emergency cutters. These were located - one each side at the forward end of the boat deck designated: No.1 starboard and No.2, port.
While at sea, the cutters were deployed outboard, over the side, and ready for immediate launch. A lit lamp was placed in each boat every evening. In the event of an emergency, they would be manned by a junior officer and select crew.
When someone fell overboard, the a life-buoy would immediately be thrown over the side on which the person fell. The engines would be stopped then the ship turned short-round and steamed dead slow back on the reverse course. During this time the emergency boat crew would be called to stations and the boats manned ready for launching. At the same time, and in day light, extra lookouts would be posted. As son as the casualty was sighted, or the last known location of the casualty was reached, the boat would, be launched and hopefully successful rescue would be accomplished and boat and survivor recovered on board.

Hope this helps.
Jim -

Very nice summary.

George
 

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