Marschall Paintings


BobinMaine

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Feb 27, 2020
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Hi All,
While I'm still new here, I'm amazed at the level of info you all provide! Great job!
Ok, so here's my question (actually, 3 questions): I am still looking for the Trumpeter 1:200 scale model. The least expensive I've found is on THG for $450 US ( ). But they are sold out, so if anyone knows of a place to find one (I'll make it easier: I won't pay $600, $700 for a model) it would be greatly appreciated.
Second: Once I get the model, I'll be using several books as guides, two of them being "Ken Marschall's Art of Titanic" and "Titanic: An Illustrated History". Both of these books are extraordinary!
Ok, third question: In many of Marschall's beautiful paintings, he shows rust in several places on the white superstructure. Do any of you believe that "she" would have had visible rust as depicted being brand new? It would be like a Debutante at her "coming out" party in a beautiful yellow pastel Dior gown with a ketchup stain down the bodice.
Thanks to all!
Bob
 
Jun 18, 2016
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Hey Bob.

I got mine at HobbyTown USA (here in TX) for $360 ($400 retail, with 10% discount...excluding tax).

Some online retailers might have them, but would imagine the first issue of the kit went fairly quickly. Am sure they will re-stock. Afraid I don't know enough about the hobby store scene up there in your part of the Northeast. Most shop owners will want you to put some (if not all) down in advance before they will order a kit of that size and expense. Mine did.

I have both of those books in my library as well. Marschall's work is the best, but don't be afraid to do some general ship research to get an idea of the normal wear and tear ships have to face.

As far as rust and water stains on a new ship... it is a constant battle against rain, spray, salt/fresh water used to hose down the decks, and salt air. So even a brand-new Titanic would not be "box pristine" in real life, so to speak. You think weathering/rust on the superstructure is tough... wait until you get into the various hull discharges, 'working decks' vs. passenger areas, and the like.

Good luck!

Kodos //
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Mister Lowe! Take a bosun's party and a Master-at-Arms, and get those children off the foc'sle at once!"
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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Yeah it doesn't take long at all. Those rust stains on the one big picture in the Titanic an Illustrated History book look they are evenly divided, almost symetrical in their spaceing. Probaly locations of drain openings for the decks above them. From my limited sea duty I can tell after our cruise was extended 3 months my ship was looking pretty poorly...rust stains and all. On our way home we were supposed to stop at Pearl Harbor but that got canceled and we beelined it back to Frisco. They used the week to make the dock side of the ship look as good as they could. Thats the side the public saw when we tied up. I was told that was a common practice. Seems reasonable. But can't say for sure because that was my only westpac/cruise.
 
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BobinMaine

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Feb 27, 2020
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Thanks for the replies! I've found an online hobby store for the model for $395 with free shipping. You've probably seen this, but I thought I'd share any way.
 
Nov 14, 2005
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Ok, third question: In many of Marschall's beautiful paintings, he shows rust in several places on the white superstructure. Do any of you believe that "she" would have had visible rust as depicted being brand new?
Ran across these photo's of Olympic and Titanic. You can see the rust stains on them if thats what they really are. I'm sure Ken M. had seen these and other pics of the superstructure when his was doing his paintings. You might have to zoom in on them.


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titanic-portholes.jpg
 
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Bob_Read

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You are showing Titanic’s port side. This was the side which was toward the dock where the passengers boarded. While in Southampton White Star took pains to ensure that their new ship looked “new” so they concentrated their touch up painting of rust on the port side. So you will notice small areas of rust more on the starboard side than the port side.
 
Nov 14, 2005
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Makes total sense. Marketing and P.R. was the name of the game. As I stated above my ship did the same thing but that was more to look good for the home folks when we can home.
 

Tim Aldrich

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Jan 26, 2018
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Ok, third question: In many of Marschall's beautiful paintings, he shows rust in several places on the white superstructure. Do any of you believe that "she" would have had visible rust as depicted being brand new?
Ran across these photo's of Olympic and Titanic. You can see the rust stains on them if thats what they really are. I'm sure Ken M. had seen these and other pics of the superstructure when his was doing his paintings. You might have to zoom in on them.
Yes there most definitely have been rust poking through in spots. The ship was built outdoors and was bare steel. Once rust starts it's always going to rear its ugly head. Chipping loose paint and rust, is a never-ending job for ships' crews.
 

TimTurner

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Dec 11, 2012
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Also, the Titanic was finished in 1912, but construction started in March 1909. Much of the ship was already 3 years old when she sailed on her maiden voyage.
 

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