Marshall Brines Drew


Tony (384)

Member
Oct 9, 2010
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Back in 1980 I was just a your wanabe photographer. I was in between jobs in Nashville Tennessee. Having a month or so till I started my first real third string photographers job I took off in my 1974 VW Van to the coast of New England to just live in the van and take photos. Along the way I happened by Snuffy's Resturant in Westerly RI. It was late in October so only the few regulars were still around. Looking for a warm meal and some adventure I went in. There were about 8 or so people there. A very interesting group and very friendly to this young stranger. I asked the group if I could take their photo. They said yes, so, I set up my camera on my tripod. Back then I had to hook up my meter by cord to take a meter reading of my flash. I had to then walk into the shot and waste an exposure to take the reading. As it turned out, that was the last frame of film I had. One shot, but I was in the shot with everyone. There was a smiling faced older man with shoulder length hair in the shot. After I took the photo he came up to me and introduced himself. It was Marshall Drew. He said, "hi, Im Marshall Drew, Titanic survivor and Im a photographer too. I was blown away to actually meet a survivor of the Titanic. We struck up a friendship. He asked me if Id like to come to his house to see his collection of photographs. He love to take photos of snow flakes. We sat in the dark watching slide tray after slide tray. He was a need fellow. We stayed in touch for a while and then we lost touch. I guess it was my self centeredness that my focus was on getting my job and career started. Now Im 58 years old and think of my time with him every now and then. So tonight I was channel surfing and saw the movie Titanic on. I decided to look on line to see if I could find anything about him and here I am. Its not much of a story I know but it is my brush with this nice man. I knew he could not still be alive as he was in his late 70s back then, but, I never knew when he died. Now I know. I am thankful that fate had let us meet. I was talking the other day to my wife and son about saving some money to go back up to RI and the Cape next year. If we do go back I will look up his grave site and pay my respects. A good man that loved the beauty of nature and had a sweet heart. I pray that he rests in peace and I was glad to know him. Rest in peace my friend, tony sylvestro Richmond Virginia
 

Dennis C.

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Apr 28, 2014
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I was a student at Grover Cleveland HS in Queens NYC in the early 60's. I was always interested in the history of the sinking of the Titanic. In our English class, we had to give a book report of a famous event in history, I chose the Titanic. After standing up in front of our class and giving a verbal report, my English teacher mentioned to me that the Art / Mechanical Drawing teacher, Mr. Drew, was an actual survivor of the Titanic. My next term, I had Mechanical Drawing as a subject and Mr.Drew was my teacher. Shortly after the term began and before a class started one day, I told him of my book report and the interest I had in the Titanic. He seemed pleased that someone as young as I (16 yrs old) took an interest in the ship. I never asked him much about his story,probably because I was too interested in girls at the time. I regret to this day,that I never talked to him about it. Try as I might, MD was as clear to me as Hieroglyphics on a stone. Mr Drew was a dedicated, soft spoken, kindly man who bent over backwards to try and assist me in MD. Too no avail. At the end of the term, he took me aside and told me he knew I was trying and gave me a passing mark of 65, "Because I spelt my name right on the drawings" that we had to submit. He also suggested that I do not take Mechanical Drawing any more and stick to the regular Art classes. Good advice. He was well liked by many students and faculty members, I gradually found out. As I look back in time now, (70 years old) I always felt it was an honor to have actually meet and talk to a survivor of HMS Titanic. I hope to see him again when my time comes to leave these earthly bonds , maybe then I can ask him those questions that haunt me to this day. "Mr Drew, what was it like? "
 

Dennis C.

Member
Apr 28, 2014
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31
Mister Drew was my 'Mechanical Drawing' teacher at Grover Cleveland H.S. in Ridgewood, Queens , NY. around 1961-62. He was a soft spoken man dedicated to his work. I only came to know of his story in later years. How I would have loved to have talked to him as a living survivor of that infamous sea trip. It is an honor to have made his acquaintance. R.I.P. Mister Drew.
 

Mike Gilluly

Member
Oct 30, 2017
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I had the pleasure of meeting Marshall Drew. I was in 6 th grade. He came to our class and showed us oragami. The art of folding paper. Wow. You just never know who you'll meet in your life.
Now I am 47 .
Dunns Corner Elem. school Mrs. Kennedy class
 

Lee Highland

Member
Jun 17, 2018
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11
In the late '60s early '70s I was in State Street Elementary and Babcock Jr. High and 2 of my friends were Doug and Chris. Their Grandfather was Marshal Drew. I met him a few times with them. I think my Grandparents knew him too. I knew him more as an artist. Unforgettable people. I think I'll go search for Doug and Chris.
 

Paul Deifel

Member
Apr 17, 2019
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11
I was a student of Mr Drew, Mr Nussbaum & Pat ( to become ) Kobets at Grover Cleveland HS in the mid 60's. Art was my favorite class. I remember Mr Drew's origami animals hanging in our art class room. Much later in life I even took it up. At that time I had heard the story of he being a survivor of the Titanic but being a teenager at the time it never other things were on my mind.
Mr Drew was a great art teacher. I'll remember him all my day's.
Paul Deifel
 

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