Mauretania 1907 Collotype Photograph Color


Eric Longo

Member
Aug 13, 2004
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Hi All,
here is a beautiful "true" color postcard of Mauretania produced with the laborious German collotype process - a photomechanical method of rendering color with smooth tonal transitions without a screen producing great depth. I re-exposed the postcard when scanning to remove some age tone with mild color correction as well. This image dates to 1907 or so - there is a vignette portrait of Captain Pritchard on the uncropped card so it would be before 1909.

Best,
Eric

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Mauretania Collotype Color Photographic postcard C. 1907 (C) EL Image Collection
 

Eric Longo

Member
Aug 13, 2004
888
2
111
Hi All,
here is another "color" image - this a printed colored photographic image from a period magazine from 1935/36 - just after her demise at Rosyth. This is her being painted white for cruise service at Berth 108. Does anyone else have any "color" images? Other than the usual color tinted cards, chrome cards, colored bas-relief and tobbacco cards these are the best color images I have to share.

Best,
Eric

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Mauretania at Western Docks, 1933 (C) EL Image Collection
 

Eric Longo

Member
Aug 13, 2004
888
2
111
Hi Daniel and Kyle,
Thank you - I am glad you enjoyed looking at them. I have 2 more I thought of - this one and a stereo card which is a tinted photograph. I will try to scan that as well. This is the famous painting by Charles Pears of her passing under the Firth of Forth Railway Bridge at 6 AM on July 4th, 1935.

Best,
Eric

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Mauretania Arriving at Rosyth" by Charles Pears (1873-1958) from a June 1936 Queen Mary Menu (C) EL IMAGE COLLECTION
"In Room III we find his oil work, clean, conscientious, with a drive for veracity, the work of a man who has seen the sea; who has had his eye on the object; who has set out to put down various effects of sea and light which might be considered rather incredible." - Ezra Pound about Charles Pears C. 1919
 
K

Kyle Johnstone

Guest
I am lucky to be able to gaze upon the original almost whenever I want.
The Mauretania has always intrigued me. I have a very nice sepia photograph of this scene, taken from the Rosyth side of the Firth of Forth, in my living room.
The Rosyth Rail Bridge is a stunning sight in and of itself, and the Mauretania passing beneath on the way to her doom, makes the scene magical and haunting.
When I visited Queensferry this past May, I stood and stared at the bridge and imagined this scene, over and over.
 

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