Mauretania a prayer for her


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Ellen Grace Butland

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On July 23rd, 1935, a service was held in Winchester Cathedral for the Shipping Festival. it included the unveiling and dedication of a model of R.M.S. Mauretania. A photocopy of the order of service can be got from Winchester Cathedral office, 5 the Close, Winchester, Hampshire SO23 9LS, England. Where is that model now, it was not in the Cathedral when I visited in 1985. The relevant passage was spoken by the Dean:- Reverend Father in God, the bugle sounds "Sunset" betokening that the day's work is done and the night is at hand. And it sounds for the passing of a great ship, which has traversed the seas for night on thirty years and is come now to the ending of her labours. Her name is "Mauretania," and there stands there beneathe the covering of yonder flag a likeness of her; which we beg the Lord Lieutenant in the King's name to unveil, and you, Sir to dedicate to the glory of God, for a memorial of her for all time and a symbol of the love that God has for those who go down to the sea in ships.
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

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Then follows several prayers for the Merchant Marine among them:
Blessed be thy Name, O Lord, for that it hath pleased Thee to prosper on so many voyages the ship which we here commemorate this day. We prise Thee for the courage and patience, the discip[line, the skill, and the courtesy of those who have served in her, whether living or departed. And we pray that this model may ever remind thos who worship in this Cathedral Church of the labours and the needs of the Merchant Navy scattered through out the world and call to their minds likewise the love and the prayers of their Mother Church; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

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So now I nail my flag to the mast. I am another person who admires the Mauretania and would like to share what little I have on her. As I have not seen this church service mentioned, I wondered if others interested in the Mauretania was aware of it. I have read the other threads with interest and thank those who have shared their postard collections and research.
 

Eric Longo

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Aug 13, 2004
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Hi Ellen,

I am glad you enjoyed the threads and posts. You service date of July 23, 1935 is just a few days short of one month until actual breaking operations began in earnest on the Mauretania in Rosyth.

Best,
Eric Longo
 

Peter Newall

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On July 23rd, 1935, a service was held in Winchester Cathedral for the Shipping Festival. "it included the unveiling and dedication of a model of R.M.S. Mauretania. A photocopy of the order of service can be got from Winchester Cathedral office, 5 the Close, Winchester, Hampshire SO23 9LS, England. Where is that model now, it was not in the Cathedral when I visited in 1985."

Hello Ellen,
The model is in the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich. On page 133 of my book on Mauretania is a photo of the model in Winchester Cathedral.
Peter

For details of the book, see:
http://www.nauticalbooks.co.uk/peternewall/index.asp
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

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Many thanks for replies. Dear Mr Longo, have you completed your book about Mauretania yet. You mentioned it in a thread about Maury's scrapping and said you had more images. I found the bow view to be very disturbing.
 

Eric Longo

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Dear Ellen,

It was a large article, not a book, and has been put on indefinite hold. I had originally been approached to write a book about her, but the situation was not workable. I have been busy lately illustrating a few books, both liner and non-liner, and also doing image restoration work for one of our National Museums, so writing has been put on the far back burner.
I am sure you have seen the other threads containing my images - there are a lot of them. I post below a link to the last article I wrote about her - I'd be very interested in your opinion and feedback. It contains a good deal of new information, an eyewitness account, period accounts, and many, many previously unpublished photographs.

Farewell to the Tyne: Photographs and Memories of the Mauretania Leaving North Shields

With best wishes on this anniversary eve,
Eric
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

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Many thanks to you and those who have helped you compile this article. May I ask another question I have a card dated 1988 from the Museum of Science and Engineering, Newcastle upon Tyne, showing yet another model of Maury, plus the letter E from her name and her engine-builders plate (how glad I am that someone thought to save this) Reason for my questions is that I am wondering where the model aboard QE2 originated (of course it may have been made especially for her) When aboard QE2 I was offered the other dining room (supposedly more posh) but no, I wanted to eat in the Mauretania room. I have a small medallion depicting the 2nd Maury, on the reverse is the statement "this medallion is made from the metal of the old Mauretania 1906-1935. I am sure you have seen one of these but it brings up another point. Metal from Maury going to Q Mary? I feel there is time constraint on this, as Maury commenced her last voyage from NY the day Q Mary was launched. I could believe more that metal passed from the 1907 Maury to the 1939 ship of the same name. Take your time to reply I realise from your previous post that you are busy. Are there any other Mauretania fans in the encyclopedia site, or does everyone lust after Titanic? As for your article, it is just tremendous. Many thanks, esp for photos, not many here in NZ.
 

Eric Longo

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Hi Ellen,

Many thanks for your kind words.
To answer your questions, the model aboard the QE2 is an original 18-foot builder’s model of Mauretania (actually a converted model of sister Lusitania, even though it depicts details such as the Promenade enclosure added to the Mauretania in 1923 etc.). It was constructed in 1907 at the Robert Smith studios in Stockton-on-Tees over the course of nearly 40 weeks at a cost of about 700 pounds.
Regarding metal from the QM being incorporated in the Mauretania, it was stated in the post demolition report to Metal Industries that a “…large amount [of metal] from the ship was used in the building of the Queen Mary..." but this is very unlikely. As you correctly pointed out, the Queen Mary had already been launched on September 26th, 1934; the same day that Mauretania left New York on her final transatlantic voyage. The Mary's superstructure was complete by about March 1936, months before the Mauretania was full scrapped. I believe all of Queen Mary’s structural steel was produced by David Colville & Sons Ltd., Dalzell Works, Motherwell, Scotland. Originally, a plan was put forth to install an entire public room from the Mauretania aboard the new vessel, but this idea was ultimately rejected. There was a second proposal to incorporate an area of decking from the Mauretania on the Queen Mary. This suggestion was also vetoed. It seems very unlikely, given the rejection of these ideas, that any effort would have been made to incorporate any of the Mauretania’s metal into the Queen Mary’s superstructure. This type of decision would be made at the yards and based on the requirements of the designers and builders specifications with time and cost foremost in mind. Additionally, if this were true, it would likely be well documented. In all probability, the scrap resulting from the demolition of the Mauretania went unnoticed into the charging boxes at a Lanarkshire steel works, and the resulting plates were used for ordinary purposes.
There are many fans of this ship here at ET, although the threads are often quiet.
Thanks again for your feedback; I am quite pleased you enjoyed the article and illustrations. I do need to ammend the article - I neglected to discuss her October 22-24 course to Liverpool from the Tyne, which was up and over Scotland.

Best,
Eric Longo
 

Peter Newall

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May I ask another question I have a card dated 1988 from the Museum of Science and Engineering, Newcastle upon Tyne, showing yet another model of Maury, plus the letter E from her name and her engine-builders plate (how glad I am that someone thought to save this) Reason for my questions is that I am wondering where the model aboard QE2 originated (of course it may have been made especially for her).........

Hello Ellen,
All the answers to your questions can be found in my Mauretania book.....it also features all the major Mauretania models etc,etc.............
Peter
 

Eric Longo

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Aug 13, 2004
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Hi again Ellen,

There are a number of items in museums that we can discuss right here, models included. Pardon any error - I am under another deadline here.

To name just a few, The Tyne and Wear Museums at Newcastle-on-Tyne have an incredible collection of fittings and articles from Mauretania, from a 1907 1:48 scale builder’s model of Mauretania lent by Messrs. Swan to the Engine Logs from the final voyage to Rosyth. One particularly interesting item is the Fog Triangle. Made of 1-½ inch thick steel, it was struck at regular intervals when running through fog. Also in the collection is a white marble statue entitled “Columbia” from the First Class Lounge, now on display after recently undergoing restoration, and a beautiful electric lamp with a polished wooden base, topped by a scalloped glass shade engraved with a Neptune motif in reference to the yards from where she launched. From the starting platform is the 33-½ inch engraved brass builder’s nameplate you mentioned that reads “THE WALLSEND SLIPWAY AND ENGINEERING CO. LTD. UNDER LICENCE FROM THE HON. C.G. PARSONS AND THE PARSONS MARINE STEAM TURBINE CO. LTD. ENGINES NO 601 1907 NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE.” Also from the engine room and starting platform is the turbine hand wheel control from the main engine, the turbine control frame with five levers for drains and sluice valves, the revolutions gauge, nine various oil pressure gauges and two engine room telegraphs. There are also sections of both the high and low-pressure turbine blades as well as a section of her sheerstrake. Additionally, there is the 2-½ foot high brass “E” recovered from her bow that is on your card and three links from her anchor chains, each weighing 170 lbs, and a lifering among still more items.

The National Museum of Science and Industry, at South Kensington, has in its collections a 1:64 scale 1906 builders model built and lent by Messrs. Swan, a sectional model amidships and in the Maritime Engine Gallery a 1:27 scale bronze model of one of her four-bladed propellers. A 1:48 scale half-block plating model, also built by Messrs. Swan and used during the construction of the ship, was in the collection until 1996.

The model aboard the QE2 we discussed yesterday is just under 1:48 scale. In addition to the alterations mentioned to that model (some reflecting changes made to the Mauretania post-war), the bow is largely that of the Lusitania with the arched boom crutch, while her bow bulwarks curiously remain curved. It is known the Mauretania's bow bulwarks were cut straight down during 1918/19, when she was armed with four bag loaded bow guns, and replaced with rope. This is a good way to help date wartime photographs that is often overlooked leading to errors in chronology.

Bob Blake, American Head of Cunard, presented a large 18 foot model of Mauretania to FDR, curiously, crudely and incorrectly repainted white with green antifouling paint at some point. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt long admired the Mauretania and mourned her passage into history, donating his entire collection to the Smithsonian on July 2 during her final voyage. His personal collection included the large model, over one hundred photographs of the vessel and a brass oil lamp from her “main lobby”. Roosevelt wrote that he “…found it hard on July 2, 1935 when we read that the MAURETANIA was on her way to the ship-breakers to be turned into shot and shell for the next war” (this is unsubstantiated). Once displayed aboard the Queen Mary, this model, apparently carved from a single piece of mahogany, is now back in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington if memory serves. It continues to occasionally inspire the odd mistaken green-hulled reference.

There is also a model in storage in Toronto which may be the 1911 Glasgow Great Exhibition model and still another at the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, originally in Winchester Cathedral which you mentioned at the start of this thread.

Best wishes,
Eric
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

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Many thanks once again for your kind replies. I will mention the medallion again, were they really made from Mauretania's fabric. I would love to think so. I also have a postcard poem, written by a Professor Wm Browning, entitled Mauretania. Once I discover how to cut and paste offline, I will put this up as a souvenir of the launch of the Mauretania, with a written comment 'the composer of this card seems to be proud of Wallsend' I have today ordered your book about Maury, Mr Newell, and will thank you in anticipation. The last book I acquired with anything about her is Ian Buxton's Metal Industries and pix of Maury there are not pretty.
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

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Yesterday, I received your book, Mr Newell, and also J Kent Layton's book Lusitania. Oh, fantastic, at last a text about the Maury that is not over 50 years old and one about Lucy which is not solely about her last voyage and/or what was hidden in her cargo. I eagerly await Mr Chirnside's book on Aquitania, my father went to war in her in 1941, I think. Many, many thanks to you both, it seems for every 1000 books abut the Titanic, there's only one or two about any other ship of that era - and I again give out a challenge to the T fans, what about Carpathia. She had an interesting life, apart from being a welcome sight one cold April morning.
 

Peter Newall

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Hello Ellen,
Thanks for your kind words about my Mauretania book and I am glad it arrived safely.
Best wishes,
Peter
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Ellen,

Thanks for your kind comments. I hope that you enjoy the Aquitania book, and if you wanted a signed copy then I would be happy to oblige. One of the remarkable aspects of Aquitania's history is the large number of people who still remember her, for she was sailing for a decade after her peers had vanished.

Best wishes,

Mark.
 
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Ellen Grace Butland

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Dear Mark, yes I would like a signed copy, but must wait until I pay off bankcard for the two books I have recently bought. I got them through Mainmast, how would I pay you - do you have an encrypted site, or do I contact you through email? Many thanks in advance.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Dear Ellen,

Thanks for your reply. If you wanted to e-mail me, then that would be fine. In time, I hope to do something with my website, but for now e-mail is the way to go.

Best wishes,

Mark.
 
Mar 7, 2011
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I would like to thank Mr. Newall for publishing this new book. I have just bought it after finding this post. For those of you who are interested in models of the RMS Mauretania, I have posted pictures of the model my Grandfather started in 1970 and that I have the daunting task of finishing. It is made of sheetmetal, brass and steel. Scale is roughly 1/96. It is 97 inches long and weighs about 160lbs. Here is a link to photos:
http://s613.photobucket.com/albums/tt216/tenor007/RMS%20Mauretania%20Model%20Ship/
Sincerely,
Glenn Williams
 
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