Mauretania photos


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jimmy cozad

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hey Eric the top pic and pic 14 are of the mauretania as she entered the Southhamton floating drydock the same dock used for the Olympic, Majestic(Bismarck)& Barengaria(Imperator)
thank of the Mauretania Scrap photo truly a sad end to the "Grand Old Lady Of The Atlantic" It's just to bad that they could not have done the same with her that they did with the Queen Mary in long beach

Hey Lucy do know what type of crane it was ? thanks

Lucy and Michael for clearing that up for me about the oil conversion

Hey Eric Michael and Lucy what is the best mauretania book to date that i can get here in the U.S.A.?
 

Eric Longo

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Hi Jimmy,

I am going on memory here, but that is Sandon Dock in Liverpool. That is not the Floating Drydock at Southampton from what I see. Too wide, and it didn't look like that. Why does her promenade appear enclosed if 1921/22?
I think it best that Mauretania went the way she did and was/is not the way (what is left of) Mary is now - not attractive from what I hear and poorly looked after!
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The best Mauretania book available - in this country? What an interesting choice of wording. As you must be aware, I gave a list recently in your other thread posted, about building a ...never mind - the list is there and it is of books from 70 to 100 years old which are all reprinted so you'll find them. Text intensive books, like the 1936 H. Jordan, are very useful indeed. Lucy might add more but those are my favorites. I read you plan to post some color Aquitania photographs - please be mindful of source and copyright status Jimmy....whether they be from online, books or even video clip screen captures....

Best,
Eric
 

jimmy cozad

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hey eric your right it is liverpool heres some infor my aunt sent me Mauretania arrives for overhaul after covering 2,000,000 miles". Liverpool, Merseyside.
as well as this stern view showing rudder and propellers
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Steve Olguin

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I would have to agree with you, Chris. I've seen a few of those photos before, and they are cropped rather oddly.
 
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I checked the site and failed to find the photo. Jimmy, I need to know as a fact that what you're posting here is in fact yours to post. Copyright infringement can lead to some very unpleasant encounters with a lawyer and we take that very seriously here.

Chris, what search criteria did you use to find that photo?
 

Eric Longo

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"...please be mindful of source and copyright status Jimmy....whether they be from online, books or even video clip screen captures...."

Hi Michael,

Yes, at the very least two of these images are published. The funnel photo and the Lusitania at John Brown. I hear the Rostron image is likely a screen capture from the 2006 Discovery Museum Exhibit film as well!

I could not find the funnel image either from that link - but no matter - it appears in the the Hulton Getty book itself - page 178 (or 187 - I just put it back on the shelf).

Best,
Eric
 

Steve Olguin

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Michael,
After looking at these photos again, I would have to agree with Eric about his mention of screen captures. When I first saw these photos, I thought they were screen captures. On closer inspection, you'll notice that the aspect ratio is the same as most documentaries (widescreen).

If they were scans of slides or even postcards, they would be much more sharper. It looks like I am looking at a TV too closely.

I think that someone can't handle his fun grass.
 

Lucy Burkhill

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Hi everyone,

The image of Captain Rostron on Mauretania's bridge is definitely a screen capture from an archive film that was made in March 1922 to show her leaving the Tyne after her refit. This short film was shown at the Discovery Museum, Newcastle, as part of the exhibition which was held from 20th September to 19th November 2006, to commemorate the centenary of Mauretania's launch. I went to see this, and quite clearly recall seeing the video loop of this great little film.

>>do you know what type of crane it was?<<

Well, Jimmy, I am no expert on cranes, but I think that particular type of crane is known as a gantry crane. The cranes at John Brown shipyard on the Clyde were built by William Arrol, who achieved fame for building the Forth Railway Bridge (which of course Mauretania passed underneath on the way to the breaker's at Rosyth!) One of the Arrol cranes is preserved at the JB shipyard site, while the rest of the yard has been sadly flattened.
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I dare say that those on this site who are more knowledgeable than me will offer further help.

The best Mauretania book...

Well, I personally wouldn't say that there is one in particular, as Eric said, refer to the list of books in the other thread. Primary sources such as "Engineering" and "The Shipbuilder", both originally published in 1907 to commemorate Mauretania's appearance, contain a wealth of technical detail about her. The Humfrey Jordan book - Mauretania, which Eric recomended, is a "biography" of Mauretania, first published in 1936, just after her demise, and it contains a great deal of information about her career, with many contributions from those who served on her. Gerald Aylmer's Mauretania - The Ship and Her Record, from about 1933, also details her life. Another good little book is Mauretania - Pride of the Tyne by Ken Smith, this has many photos of her on the Tyne. The recent book Mauretania - Triumph and Resurrection, by Peter Newall, is interesting for its information about the auctioning-off of fittings from her, and where these ended up.

And yes, Eric, I'm with you in that I feel it was best that Mauretania ended up the way she did, after learning of various accounts on the state of the Queen Mary at Long Beach. OK, the breaker's is cruel and brutal, but at the end of the day, it's a natural end for a ship. At least old Maury had a darn good life, when the time came for her final journey, she was given a civic send-off from Southampton Docks, and she stopped at the mouth of the Tyne so that the city of her birth could say goodbye to her - those who were on the flotilla of small boats that came out to greet her sang "Old Lang Syne"! Also, in the Depression-hit North of England, her scrapping provided work for hundreds.

Regards,

Lucy
 

Lucy Burkhill

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>>Also, in the Depression-hit North of England<<

Oops, geographical error here! What I meant to put was "North of United Kingdom", as Rosyth is of course in Scotland, not England!! Apologies to any Scots who may be reading this! However, it can be said that her scrapping did bring benefits to North East England in that scrap souvenirs from her decking were produced by the Hughes Bolckow Shipbreaking Co Ltd, Blyth.

Regards,

Lucy
 
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