May Peel Futrelle


Apr 26, 2005
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Hi! Does someone really know in which lifeboat Mrs Jacques Futrelle escaped? It is likely that she embarked in the same boat as Mrs Harris, her friend, but some sources place her in lifeboat 9 and some others place her in lifeboat 16. Thanks,

Charles
 
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Katie Sharrocks (Katie)

Guest
In the book "Women And children First" it says no.9. Other books say the same thing.
 
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Jeffrey Kern (Jeffrey)

Guest
To Katie:

Is that 'Women and Children First' by Judith B. Geller? If so, Mrs Geller does not mention that Mrs Futrelle entered Lifeboat 9, but it is most likely she and her husband stayed with their friends, the Harrises. My speculation, therefore, is that she definitely was in Collapsible D.
 
Apr 25, 2001
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Mrs Futrelle is probably one of the most enigmatic survivors to place in a particular lifeboat; Colonel Gracie put her in boat No 9, she describes 'the last boat on the starboard side' and said this was boat 16, she also describes some stewards in her boat and that she was with Mrs Harris. Now, the most likely boat is probably the half-filled collapsible boat D, but one never knows.....

Best regards,

Peter Engberg-Klarström
 
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J. Michael Doyle

Guest
A few months ago, someone quoted in this forum Mrs. Ella Holmes White as having said that it was not so much courage on the part of the men passengers that made them remain on board the Titanic, but rather the fact that no one really believed it would sink. They went on to say that Mrs. White was a credible source.
I would suggest that Mrs. White is somewhat less than credible as a source for two reasons:
First, she had just abandoned her valet, Sante Ringhini, to his fate. She, after all, was the cause of his being on the Titanic, facing imminent death. One suspects there is some creative rationalization on the lady's part.
Second, I am tempted to call a person who owns a walking stick with a lightbulb, of all things, attached to it, very eccentric, to put it kindly.
 
Apr 16, 2001
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Dear Mr. Doyle,

While Mrs. White may have been a bit eccentric, she did relate valuable testimony before the U.S. Senate Inquiry. Many of the incidents she described corresponded with what other survivors remembered. She stated that the ship broke in two before it went down. Other "credible" witnesses who believed just the opposite and whose testimonies other historians relied upon were later proven to be incorrect.

Mrs. White's manservant, Mr. Reghini, was lost in the disaster. Mrs. White can hardly be blamed for this. The "women and children" first rule applied to the men filling boat #8. I doubt Mrs. White knew that her valet's life was in peril. She, like many other women in boat #8 who left their husbands behind, didn't fear for the safety of Mr. Reghini. The women were assured that the men would follow later. Mrs. White did pay for Mr. Reghini's body to be shipped home to New York from Halifax. I understand she also gave his surviving family a "sizable" amount of compensation for his loss.

The opera cane that Mrs. White had was her support to the boat deck. You may not know that Mrs. White injured herself while boarding the Titanic in Cherbourg. She never left her stateroom until the night of the disaster. She brought along the opera cane to help her "hobble" to the boat deck. She had to be "helped into the boat" because of her injury. Many ladies in boat #8 regarded her opera cane (with an electric light), as a means of salvation - the light would undoubtedly be spotted by other lifeboats, and perhaps a rescue ship. They were very pleased that she had it.

Mrs. White's great-nephew did tell me that his aunt was somewhat eccentric - but noticeably so in her much later years. She apparently later had her eyeglass case ensribed "Survivor of the Titanic." Regardless, she was a reliable source of information regarding the Titanic disaster. She was adamant in many of her statements, and certainly told the truth. I have regarded her testimony as one of the best I have seen and read. Many of the Titanic's officers and crew contradicted their own accounts of the sinking (and these men were thought to be the *credible* witnesses).

Michael Findlay
 
May 3, 2005
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A few months ago, someone quoted in this forum Mrs. Ella Holmes White as having said that it was not so much courage on the part of the men passengers that made them remain on board the Titanic, but rather the fact that no one really believed it would sink. They went on to say that Mrs. White was a credible source.
I would suggest that Mrs. White is somewhat less than credible as a source for two reasons:
First, she had just abandoned her valet, Sante Ringhini, to his fate. She, after all, was the cause of his being on the Titanic, facing imminent death. One suspects there is some creative rationalization on the lady's part.
Second, I am tempted to call a person who owns a walking stick with a lightbulb, of all things, attached to it, very eccentric, to put it kindly.
I don't think (here I go again with another one of my big "IMHO's".LOL) why anyone with a walking stick with a lightbulb would be called eccentric . Looks like they would have been very handy when walking on a dark night. How about carrying a walking stick and a flashlight ?
And maybe the walking stick with a lightbulb might have been the latest thing in 1912 ?
Doubtless there are other things that make the poor lady seem like an eccentric person ?
I also think that both men and women stayed on board Titanic was not so much of courage but that they thought the ship was unsinkable and they would be safer and warmer
staying on the ship in the known ⁿlighted spaces
than taking to the lifeboats in the unknown dark and frigid waters.
 
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