Dec 13, 1999
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Hi! Does someone really know in which lifeboat Mrs Jacques Futrelle escaped? It is likely that she embarked in the same boat as Mrs Harris, her friend, but some sources place her in lifeboat 9 and some others place her in lifeboat 16. Thanks,

Charles
 
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Katie Sharrocks (Katie)

Guest
In the book "Women And children First" it says no.9. Other books say the same thing.
 
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Jeffrey Kern (Jeffrey)

Guest
To Katie:

Is that 'Women and Children First' by Judith B. Geller? If so, Mrs Geller does not mention that Mrs Futrelle entered Lifeboat 9, but it is most likely she and her husband stayed with their friends, the Harrises. My speculation, therefore, is that she definitely was in Collapsible D.
 
Dec 13, 1998
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Mrs Futrelle is probably one of the most enigmatic survivors to place in a particular lifeboat; Colonel Gracie put her in boat No 9, she describes 'the last boat on the starboard side' and said this was boat 16, she also describes some stewards in her boat and that she was with Mrs Harris. Now, the most likely boat is probably the half-filled collapsible boat D, but one never knows.....

Best regards,

Peter Engberg-Klarström
 
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J. Michael Doyle

Guest
A few months ago, someone quoted in this forum Mrs. Ella Holmes White as having said that it was not so much courage on the part of the men passengers that made them remain on board the Titanic, but rather the fact that no one really believed it would sink. They went on to say that Mrs. White was a credible source.
I would suggest that Mrs. White is somewhat less than credible as a source for two reasons:
First, she had just abandoned her valet, Sante Ringhini, to his fate. She, after all, was the cause of his being on the Titanic, facing imminent death. One suspects there is some creative rationalization on the lady's part.
Second, I am tempted to call a person who owns a walking stick with a lightbulb, of all things, attached to it, very eccentric, to put it kindly.
 
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Dec 12, 1999
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Dear Mr. Doyle,

While Mrs. White may have been a bit eccentric, she did relate valuable testimony before the U.S. Senate Inquiry. Many of the incidents she described corresponded with what other survivors remembered. She stated that the ship broke in two before it went down. Other "credible" witnesses who believed just the opposite and whose testimonies other historians relied upon were later proven to be incorrect.

Mrs. White's manservant, Mr. Reghini, was lost in the disaster. Mrs. White can hardly be blamed for this. The "women and children" first rule applied to the men filling boat #8. I doubt Mrs. White knew that her valet's life was in peril. She, like many other women in boat #8 who left their husbands behind, didn't fear for the safety of Mr. Reghini. The women were assured that the men would follow later. Mrs. White did pay for Mr. Reghini's body to be shipped home to New York from Halifax. I understand she also gave his surviving family a "sizable" amount of compensation for his loss.

The opera cane that Mrs. White had was her support to the boat deck. You may not know that Mrs. White injured herself while boarding the Titanic in Cherbourg. She never left her stateroom until the night of the disaster. She brought along the opera cane to help her "hobble" to the boat deck. She had to be "helped into the boat" because of her injury. Many ladies in boat #8 regarded her opera cane (with an electric light), as a means of salvation - the light would undoubtedly be spotted by other lifeboats, and perhaps a rescue ship. They were very pleased that she had it.

Mrs. White's great-nephew did tell me that his aunt was somewhat eccentric - but noticeably so in her much later years. She apparently later had her eyeglass case ensribed "Survivor of the Titanic." Regardless, she was a reliable source of information regarding the Titanic disaster. She was adamant in many of her statements, and certainly told the truth. I have regarded her testimony as one of the best I have seen and read. Many of the Titanic's officers and crew contradicted their own accounts of the sinking (and these men were thought to be the *credible* witnesses).

Michael Findlay
 
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Mike Poirier

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Dec 12, 1999
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There has always been confusion over May Futrelle's boat. May remembers it being 16. But she also says Miss Thaw ( Maybelle Thorne )and Rene Harris was in her boat. We know Thorne was in D. She also mentions Jane Hoyt who was in the vicinity who also ended up in D. Rene Harris remembers travelling from boat to boat with a select group of 1st class women before she was convinced to get into D. Is there any evidence that proves that May was in 16?
 
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Ben Thomas Sebastian Holme

Guest
Hi Jason and Michael,

If this helps, it was reported that Jacques Futrelle shouted to his wife, "This is your last chance, for god's sake go!"
As collapsible D literally was the "last chance" of escape without getting cold and wet, it makes sense that Mrs. Futrelle escaped on that boat.

Yours sincerely
Ben (new person)
 

Mike Poirier

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Dec 12, 1999
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Ben:
Even though Jacques supposedly said this- when you read accounts you have to take certain things with a grain of salt. But if you see certain clues such as mentioning certain names that were grouped together ( ie Jane Hoyt and Mabel Thorne ) you can draw logical conclusions. Many husbands implored wives believing it was their last chance. But not every woman left in the last boat.
The reason I originally questioned this was that she has been listed in 9 and 16 as well. Even though I believe D, I wanted to see if there was evidence otherwise.
 
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Daniel Rosenshine

Guest
Gracie did put her in 9, perhaps he had conversed with her personally or had other evidence (which he did not mention) to place her in 9.

I was also thinking, since 16 and D were both part of a flotilla of boats, where passengers were shuffled around so that 14 could go rescue some more. Perhaps May F. was in 16 and changed boats to D.

Then again, she does not seem to mention that incident (I have not read any of her accounts, but this would have been pointed out if she had written it).

Daniel.

PS. Mike, I wrote you an e-mail some time ago, just wondering if you had changed your address.
 

Mike Poirier

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Dec 12, 1999
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No Daniel
i did not receive your email. But I should wanr you in advance I am not doing too much with Titanic right now. I have been concentrating on 4 other ships. Lusitania, Laconia, Vestris and Athenia.
 
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Daniel Rosenshine

Guest
Mike,

I was offering to send some things, but if you're not doing much with Titanic it would probably be of no use to you.

Is your e-mail address still @earthlink?

D.
 
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Ben Thomas Sebastian Holme

Guest
Dan,

I'm a little confused about the flotillas.
As I understood it, Officer Lowe rounded up boats 4,10,12 and D along with his boat #14 and transferred passengers. I do not think 16 was part of this flotilla. However, #16 did transfer a stoker to #6 but this was separate from the big one. The only other transfer occurred between boats #5 and #7.
Regards
Ben
 
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Daniel Rosenshine

Guest
Ben,

I could be wrong. I never did too much reading into the boats, I knew about 5/7 and I knew that quite a few port boats were tied together into a flotilla, so I guess I presumed 16 was there too.

As I said she does not mention being transferred, and at least three boats are mentioned for her, so I too am confused about where she could be.

Daniel.
 

Arne Mjåland

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Oct 21, 2001
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According to the ET biography of her the local newspapers carried no death notice about her. It is wrong- "The Patriot Ledger" Scituate published her obituary Oct. 31 1967. It is mentioned that she was a writer of several books and short stories. She had one son, Jaques Futrelle of Washington. and a daughter Mrs. Charles F. (Virginia)Raymond of Scituate. Burial was at St. Marys Cemetery.
Judith B. Geller has written three pages about the couple May and Jacques Futrelle in her book Titanic Frauen und Kinder zuerst.
.
 

Mark Baber

Moderator
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Jul 4, 2000
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Hello, Arne---

If you have a copy of that obit---and it sounds as if you do---why not transcribe it and add it to her bio page?
 

Arne Mjåland

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Oct 21, 2001
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Eites Thursday for Mrs. Futrelle' survivor of Titanic
SCITUATE A high mass of requiem for Mrs. May (Peel) Futrelle, 91, of 33 Circuit Ave, one of the few remaining survivors of the Titanic will be celebrated Thursday at 9 a.m. in St Mary of the Nativity Church
She died Sunday in a Scituate nursing home.
Born in Georgia, she had lived in Scituate about 60 years.
Mrs. Futrelle and her husband, a writer and author of the "Thinking Machine " mysteries were abroad the Titanic for its maiden voyage from England to New York. Mr. Futrelle was among the more than 1500 victims who died when the ship struck the iceberg April 15 1912.
Mrs. Futrelle is also the author of several books and short stories.
She is survived by a son, Jacques Futrelle Jr. of Washington DC, and a daughter Mrs. Charles F. (Virginia) Raymond of Scituate, with whom she made her home.
Burial will be in St. Marys Cemetery. Visiting hours are omitted. Funeral arrangements were completed by Sparrel Funeral Home.
 

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