Meals on board

  • Thread starter Stefan Christiansson
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Nichole Tamayo

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Lee,

I'm not quite certain of the brands of that era but I can tell you what types of wines they did carry:

Red and White Bordeaux
Red and White Burgundy
Sherry
Dry Rhine
Moselle
Champagne
Muscatel, Tokay, and Madeira (with desserts)

This all may be a given, but just wanted to let you know anyways
happy.gif


Nickey
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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There's a complete drinks and tobacco list on this web page:

http://www.euronet.nl/users/keesree/food.htm#Winelist

Hopefully it is accurate, but many of the 1912 prices quoted certainly are not - the webmaster seems to have confused shillings with pounds, thereby increasing the prices by a factor of 20. The prices quoted in pence (eg 6d = sixpence) do seem to be accurate, as do the the dollar prices.
 

Bob Godfrey

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This might be a good point to offer a guide to the mysteries of pre-decimal British currency for those too young to remember it. The pound was divided into 20 shillings, and the shilling into 12 pence. The abbreviation for pennies was d rather than p, as in £1 10s 6d. Prices below a pound were often written in the form eg 19/11 or 10/6 and spoken as 'nineteen and eleven' or 'ten and six'. Prices less than a shilling were spoken and written as one word - eg twopence, sixpence, tenpence etc.

Coinage was (in increasing value): farthing, halfpenny (pronounced 'hapeny'), penny, threepenny bit, sixpence (a 'tanner'), shilling (a 'bob'), two shillings (a 'florin' or 'two bob bit'), two shillings and sixpence ('half crown' or 'half a dollar'). Paper money was ten shillings ('ten bob note'), one pound (a 'quid'), five pounds (a 'fiver') and so on. Clear as mud, eh?
 
Jan 28, 2003
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"the webmaster seems to have confused shillings with pounds, thereby increasing the prices by a factor of 20."
So - methinks the Webmaster is not 'of an age' with us, Bob ....
 

Bob Godfrey

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Bet you remember penny chews and twopence back on the bottle, Monica! And all those items that were priced at nineteen and eleven rather than a quid.
:)
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Well, some things don't change, Bob. They're now pricing things at 99p, £1.99 etc., same principle. But yes, as you very well know, I do remember all that. Only now I don't get twopence back on the bottle. Instead, I get threatened with prosecution if I don't recycle in the blue wheelybin! I pay far more in taxes -WHERE'S ALL THE MONEY GOING?? (Mods - nothing to do with Titanic - sorry, but occasionally one has to let it all out..)
 

Lee Gilliland

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Not yelling or anything, I know it gets to people. But I think the reason this kind of thing gets stuck in a separate category because politics cause fights and a lot of people consider Titanic an avocation rather than a vocation.
 

Lee Gilliland

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It's not just there, Bob. I actually remember places my Grandpa would take us for penny candy - like those long things in strips that were candy dots. You guys have those?
 
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Nichole Tamayo

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CANDY DOTS!

I love those things. Couldn't get enough of those when I was a kid!!!

Nickey
 

Lee Gilliland

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ALLL RIIGHTTT!! Knew someone would know them! Good job!

Bob, don't know the lot as they seem to be all Brit candy, but I look forward to exploring a whole bunch of new taste sensations - thank you!
 

Inger Sheil

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Bet you remember penny chews and twopence back on the bottle, Monica! And all those items that were priced at nineteen and eleven rather than a quid.
There might be a generational difference there, Bob, but we had our own variation in Oz during my childhood...one and two cent lollies. Much agonising went on about how best to spend 5 cents at the shops. When these small denominations were abolished and prices were rounded up and down, some enterprising kiddies went into shops and asked for a single lolly (say, a freckle, a milkbottle, a set of teeth etc), and the storekeeper would be obliged to round it down to 0 cents. We still get 'Picnic' bars mentioned on that site down here - they were never repackaged.

One of my favourite yarns about these little bags of sweets relates to Michael Collins. Dating to c.1920, it followed on from a quarrel he had with his cousin over some intelligence work she'd done for him. Collins could be very demanding and had a lightening temper. By way of apology, he showed up after curfew outside her window and called her down to explain the terrible strain he was under and say he was sorry. The most wanted man in the British Empire, who had risked capture by breaking curfew, left her a little gift on the garden wall...a small paper bag of the bullseyes that he knew she enjoyed!

To bring this back to the Titanic, it's interesting to consider confectionary preferences in 1912. I know at least one officer who had a sweet tooth and spent a day in his bunk as an apprentice eating biscuits and sweets.
 

Lee Gilliland

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Certainly we should bring it back to the ship, that's what we're here for. Was there a separate dessert menu, as we sometimes have now, or did they come around with a sweets trolly at the end of the meal?
 

Inger Sheil

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I don't mind Mumm's, Michael, and it's on the list...and used to knock back a bit of the Moet et Chandon (think we have a few bottles of that and the standard Bollinger at home somewhere). These days, though, I'm back quaffing some very decent Oz champagnes (or 'Champagnois' or 'sparkling' to appease the French).

Which leads to a round or two of Bing & Frank singing:
Frank: 'This French Champagne...'
Bing: 'Domestic!'
Frank: 'So good for...the brain!'
 

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