Meals on board

  • Thread starter Stefan Christiansson
  • Start date

Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>There is a particular restaurant (Tai Ping Koon) in Hong Kong <<

I don't know why, but that name strikes a bell. I've been to Hong Kong several times so it could have been one among many mixed in with the MacDonalds and Pizza Huts that were everywhere to be found. Was this place on Victoria Island or out in New Kowloon? I went to a floating restaurant there once and had an encounter with rice wine at this place. Wine! What an innocuous sounding name for something that had me diving for the water pitcher!
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Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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Tai Ping Koon is at Mong Kok, Kowloon. It was founded in 1860 and its the first restaurant in Guangzhou specializing in Western cuisine. Their dishes are nice, especially the Portuguese style baked chicken but I can't stand the two special 'teas' that they serve there!
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T. Eric Brown

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Jun 5, 2005
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Ha! Ha! Ha! I can't believe that people actually ate the crap that they did back then. Then again I guess that they wouldn't have touched a Big Mac.
 

T. Eric Brown

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The idea of raw fish makes me cringe. What is it with people and sushi? The passengers on Titanic lived in an era before pizza, hamburgers, hot dogs and mac and cheese. But at least they had ice cream. Did you know that? Titanic had a rather large load of ice cream on board.
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Don't knock it! In South Australia's Port Lincoln they grow rich on Japanese food fads. Think $1,000 AUS for a tuna that meets sashimi standards. Think crazy prices for abalone. A local diver once told me that abalone diving is like swimming around picking up $50 notes. Our lobster is pretty pricey too. When I was a little lad, lobster, which we call crayish, was a cheap treat for Friday nights. Now it's a valuable export that travels by air to Asia and elsewhere.
 

T. Eric Brown

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I wonder what flavors of ice cream they had. Probably only vanilla. Coca Cola was around then, I wonder why they didn't have any on board.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Not cocaine, because that had been removed several years earlier. But there was at the time a lot of concern over the caffeine content! Coca-Cola had been battling with Government agencies like the Bureau of Chemistry, who held caffeine suspect as a habit-forming drug and a hazard to the American public. The legal wrangles ended up in the Supreme Court, and though the company won the early rounds (at great expense) by establishing that the hazard was unproven and that there was in any case more caffeine in a mug of coffee or tea than in a bottle of Coke, eventually they did agree to make concessions and the case was settled out of court. Titanic sailed into history at a time when the caffeine controversy was at its height, and when some parents believed that Coca-Cola drinking might provide their children with a first step on the road to ruin!
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Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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The only soft drinks available on White Star liners in 1912 were the traditional lemonade and ginger ale, along with a range of mineral waters. The ice cream served would have been of two types. The lighter and more crystalline American style was more fashionable in 1st class, but further down the social scale most people favoured the European style, which was made smoother and thicker by the addition of egg yolks. These were generally lightly flavoured with lemon or vanilla and were very palatable in themselves, but could be served also as basic ingredients of more elaborate desserts which included other elements like chocolate, fruit and nuts. Much better than cramming the lot into a blender to produce a tub of flavoured ice cream!
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Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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"The only soft drinks available on White Star liners in 1912 were the traditional lemonade and ginger ale..."

Ginger beer I would have thought.

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Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Like Titanic, ginger ale was invented in Belfast but unlike Titanic it crossed the Atlantic successfully. White Star offered two popular brands - Cantrell & Cochrane (the original) and Ross's 'Belfast Ginger Ale'. Ginger beer, as far as I know, is very similar but more strongly flavoured and sometimes mildly alcoholic (much like myself).

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Bob Godfrey

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Sam, I've not seen an ice cream maker specifically listed as such, but the kitchens had every kind of machine available to the catering industry, including electrically-powered blenders and freezers, so I imagine they were well-equipped to make ice cream in bulk.
 

Bob Godfrey

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I'm forgetting that the Olympic Class ships generally took on about 400 gallons of ice cream when provisioning, so maybe they had no need to make more on board. But it might well have been freshly made for desserts of the highest quality, if only in the restaurant kitchen, where the crew list included a specialist 'iceman/confectioner'.
 

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