Meals on board

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T. Eric Brown

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Jun 5, 2005
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>>...the European style, which was made smoother and thicker by adding egg yolks<<

Egg yolks in ice cream? Uhhhh! I'd just as soon keep egg out of my ice cream thank you.
 
Nov 18, 2005
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Hi this is my first post! i need some1 who can help me with the question "what did the 3rd class people eat?"

thankin u

[Moderator's note: This post was in another thread in this subtopic, but has been moved here. JDT]
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Bob's link is a good one, though beware that some of the links in the older messages go to websites which either no longer exist or which have been moved to Gods know where. The short version is that third class ate from a bill of fare which was hearty and bland. Nothing fancy, but good filling things such as biscuits with jams and butter, meat pies, potatoes, puddings, cheese, pasteries and so on. My understanding is that White Star, like a number of other lines had a bill of fare which had standard menues that rotated with each day of the week.

While it wasn't especially luxurious, it was what most third class passengers were accustomed to and there was plenty of it.
 

Don Tweed

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Mar 30, 2006
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Okay, I don't know if this has been asked, but what is "cockie leekie". I have to know.
I may have starved on Titanic.
There's got to be a cheeseburger in 3rd class!
-Don
 

Bob Godfrey

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'Cock-a-leekie' is basically chicken broth with leeks. In the old days it often had oatmeal and/or other greens added to stretch it if there were lots of mouths to feed and the chicken and leeks were in short supply.
 

Bob Godfrey

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You could buy a regular hamburger much earlier than that, but in those days for many people meat was a luxury to be enjoyed instead of cheese! If you wanted to partake while crossing the pond, Don, your best bet would have been to travel on the Hamburg-America line. They served a grilled ground-beef pattie between two slices of bread (but that's not the origin of the name). I'm sure the kitchen staff could have added a slice of cheese if palms were greased, but they'd have thought you were mad.
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Nov 1, 2008
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In ANTR, Lord mentions several people grabbing oranges to take with them as the boat sank. Can one of our experts tell me if they would have been strictly a First Class thing, or if such were available to Third Class too? Still waiting for all my books to arrive and impatient. ;)
 

Bob Godfrey

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Yes, oranges (and apples) were served to 3rd Class, but only with the main meal of the day - 'dinner', which was in the middle of the day for 3rd Class. At other times fruit could be bought from the bar, or maybe obtained from a friendly steward. Or from a businesslike one if a small tip was provided!
 

Ben Lemmon

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What about the other classes, though, Bob? If a second-class boy wanted fruit, would he be able to simply get it, or would he have to wait for each mealtime (though I don't think that would be too long)? Also, could anyone help me with another question? I wonder what second-class was fed during the voyage. I know at one time, they were served eggs, as evidenced by the memory of Michel Navratil. Does anyone know what the typical breakfast was on board a turn-of-the-century Transatlantic liner?
 

Bob Godfrey

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Here's a typical 2nd Class breakfast menu from 1912 - a very good selection, I'd say.

Rolled oats
Boiled hominy
Fresh fish
Yarmouth bloaters
Grilled ox kidneys and bacon
American dry hash au gratin
Grilled sausage
Mashed potatoes
Grilled ham & fried eggs
Fried potatoes
Vienna & Graham rolls
Soda scones
Buckwheat cakes
Maple syrup
Conserve
Marmalade
Tea
Coffee
Watercress

In 2nd Class fresh fruit (eg apples and oranges) was available at luncheon and dinner, and could no doubt be obtained at other times as suggested above.
 

Ben Lemmon

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I quite agree with you, Bob. I wish I could have a breakfast menu like that each morning.

-"What would you like today, m'dear?"
-"Oh, lets start with the Fresh fish, grilled ox kidneys and bacon. We'll then top that off with fried potatoes and Vienna rolls - can I get marmalade with that? And to drink, I would like a nice cup o' tea, I would."

But alas, I would find that only in my wildest dreams. How is it that you knew this, Bob? I wish to drink from the fountain of knowledge that you must have found, but my searches have proved fruitless!

By the way, what time was luncheon and dinner?
 

Bob Godfrey

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Hopefully you'll appreciate that the menu includes selections - you couldn't have all of it! So the fresh fish and kidney & bacon were probably an either/or.

How do I know these things? Well, Ben, as you are constantly suggesting - I was there! But seriously, the answer is great age and having nothing better to do. In the short term, I suggest you become an expert Googler - there are plenty of menus, for instance, on the Web. Also learn to use the search engine in this forum, as just about everything has come up for discussion at some time or another.

8-10am for breakfast, from 1pm for lunch and from 7pm for dinner.
 

Ben Lemmon

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I'm guessing you have to become as a fine wine. You must ripen with age. I have begun acquainting myself with the internet, Googling, and the wonderful world of Wikipedia. That has helped increase my knowledge exponentially. But I will take your words to heart. I never knew the fountain of knowledge was actually the information super highway. Oh, the brilliance of modern technology.

Thanks for the times of breakfast, lunch and dinner. Did they have afternoon tea, or was that strictly a first class deal?

Thanks again for all the help, Bob.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Tea and coffee, along with milk for babies, could be had by all Classes at any time during the working day (and for no extra charge). So whether or not you had afternoon tea or morning coffee or whatever was really your personal choice.

The fountain of knowledge flows from primary sources, Ben. But the Web is great for specific bits of factual information - provided you keep in mind that (especially in Wikipedia) it ain't necessarily so! With regard to the kind of stuff I post in this forum, I find it very useful to have grown up in the middle of the last century, at a time much closer in all respects to the Edwardian era than to the present day. So, in a sense, I really was there. Almost!
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