Memorial Services in New York


Ben Lemmon

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Oct 9, 2009
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Memorial services, from what I understand, took place around the world after the sinking of the Titanic. They took place in London, Southampton, Paris, and New York. However, I have a question about the services that took place in New York. I have read the recollection of certain facts in the article RMS Titanic: The Funerals, Memorials and Legacy of the Lost Passengers and Her Crew here on this website. It mentions a Dr. L. Mason Clark of "the first Presbyterian Church" who delivered a powerful sermon, one that I might use in my writing. However, it does not state the place where he delivered this sermon. A search in Titanic: Triumph and Tragedy proved fruitless. Is there anyone who might be able to help me in this regard? I don't necessarily want to know where this specific sermon was given, but all the sermons in New York in general. If anyone could help me with this little snippet of a fact, it would be greatly appreciated.
 

Rachel Mines

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Jun 2, 2008
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No answers, but another question...

Does anyone know of any specifically Jewish memorial services in New York? Apparently my mom's aunt, whose brother died on the Titanic, travelled to New York to attend a memorial service. Since the family is Jewish, I assume she would have attended a Jewish service. I'm interested in finding out anything about it.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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Ben my friend; Lorenzo Mason Clark gave his sermon at the First Presbyterian Church, on Henry Street, in Brooklyn.

http://www.fpcbrooklyn.org/

you might want to contact them to see what, if anything, pertaining to the sermon they have preserved in their archives.

ALL the sermons is a pretty tall order, and it would probably be faster to document the NYC churches and synagogues that did NOT have a special Titanic-themed sermon or mass on the Sabbath following 4/15.
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HOWEVER, a good place to start is on the religious notes pages of the NY Times, which is now online, for free, up 'til 1923.
 

Ben Lemmon

Member
Oct 9, 2009
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Jim, thanks for the information. I'm not one for secular knowledge about religion. I know very little.

I did find, after re-reading the article from last year, a reference to a newspaper the author used. It was a reference to a Brooklyn Daily Eagle, or something similar. After checking that it would be available, I requested it through the ILL service at my university. I hope it provides the information I am looking for. Anyway, thanks for your help, Jim. I will look into contacting them. It sounds like a good idea.
 

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