Men who were offered but turned down a lifeboat place


Status
Not open for further replies.

Tom McLeod

Member
Sep 1, 2005
186
1
183
I've always believed much of Baker Joughin's story. But with few to observe him that either lived or payed attention to one person's actions we have generally just his word. There were other accounts of drinking, Storekeeper Foley had some brandy on him, Jack Thayer talked of a man who downed a bottle of Gordon's Gin and later saw the man on the Carpathia. As you mention, there could be a lot of factors combined with the amount one drinks that may play a role in survival; if anything maybe it calmed those folks down to focus (best they could) on the situation and not get so upset that they made desperate choices. Acting on my own or what others have talked about those times when one drinks a lot; I/they don't always seem to remember the night before as clearly as what took place. But that again is a guess based on experiance, something to think about, but it doesn't change the baker's story officially, just a few things to ponder. If everything occurred the way he described it or even most everything, he is another interesting addition to those who tried to help and against all odds found a place among the living!
 
Jun 11, 2000
2,524
26
313
I'm sure I couldn't down a bottle of Gordon's gin. Well, not and survive anything at all, really. However, depending on one's capacity/limits, the alcohol could maybe confer short-term benefits. I can see that I might have jumped and survived better after a couple of glasses of white, but only if I were young - not now, of course. Instant death - cardiac arrest! But that wouldn't really to be anything to do with the alcohol - more just to do with age and general decrepitude.

You can't take people's own evidence of their personal habits very seriously, and the only evidence we have is people who paddled around and either died or survived in waters that would kill most of us in a fairly short time. Why would some aging guy in a fur coat, primed with booze, survive when loads of other young, sober ones perished? Probably, because he didn't hit anything when he left the ship and took the dive. And was near enough to a boat. Just luck.

One can over-analyse this sort of thing, you know.
 
May 27, 2007
3,917
23
173
One can over-analyse this sort of thing, you know.

Yes, indeed. Rhoda Abbott was up to either her knees or chest in the freezing water in collapsible A. She had seen her sons die of exposure when they were either on a piece of wreckage or in Collapsible A according to Amy Stanley's account.-

Amy Stanley later recalled:

"We were very close since we were on the Titanic together. And her stateroom had been near mine. I was the only one that she could talk to about her sons because I knew them myself. She told me that she would get [sic] in the lifeboat if there hadn't been so many people around. So she and her sons kept together. She was thankful that [the] three of them had stayed with her on that piece of wreckage (? Collapsible A Perhaps?-G.Lorton). The youngest went first then the other son went. She grew numb and cold and couldn't remember when she got on the Carpathia. There was a piece of cork in her hair and I managed to get a comb and it took a long time but finally we got it out."

Taken from ET Rhoda Abbott's bio Collapsible A.

- And yet Ms. Abbott made it after suffering a few broken ribs as well. I would have given up after an hour if I had suffered what she'd gone though.
 

Tom McLeod

Member
Sep 1, 2005
186
1
183
Some more very good points. Trying to figure out who survived and how, after the ship left them would be a very long subject. If anything I guess it is the will to live, shock, chemical reactions in the body to keep one going . . . luck. Who really knows what one is capable of when all seems lost. I've had a few accidents in life and looking back, something kept me going when I should not have been up to it.
 
Jul 9, 2000
58,666
881
563
Easley South Carolina
>>Trying to figure out who survived and how, after the ship left them would be a very long subject.<<

Maybe not. For those who made it into the boats, by hook, crook, invitation or on orders, this one is a no-brainer. For those in contact with the water, the key to survival was getting out of it as soon as possible. They may have been uncomfortable and cold to the point of being frostbitten, but at least they survived.
 

Tom McLeod

Member
Sep 1, 2005
186
1
183
Very true Michael,

The quicker one got out of those temperatures the better. I was just thinking, that to factor in ranging metabolisms, stimulants, ability to cope with the anxiety factor, and many other such factors could take awhile or forever to go through. It also would be one of the more painful subjects, to talk about how some people could of made it, were others just where there to die, not by choice. Another question that comes to mind is, do we really want to know what happend to the 1500 or so that were in the water after the stern disappered or do we want to just ponder aspects. Personally I'm up to any challenge on the subject, but this one would be quite heartbreaking.

Respectfully yours,

Tom I. McLeod
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads