Millvina Dean

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Brian King

Guest
I have just read on www.arthurprice-us.com that Millvina Dean, at 9 weeks old, was the youngest passenger on the Titanic.

Is there any evidence to substantiate this claim and do we know if there were any other infants on board ?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Well if you wish, you could go through the passenger lists that can be accessed on the index page. Each listing includes the ages of the passengers. Millvina's biography can be accessed HERE.

She's had quite an interesting life. Happily, she's still with us.
 

John Clifford

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Nov 12, 2000
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Many of us have had the great joy to meet this splendid, wonderful, GRAND Lady.

She's currently the youngest survivor.
I have not checked the full list of passengers' ages. However, the other infant, that survived, was 9-month old Trevor Allison. He, sadly, died in 1929, at age 17.

I do hope Millvina will be with us, for many wonderful years.
When she reaches 100, I will pay for a tuxedo for Phil Hind, so he can arrange a party, to honor this lovely lady.
Phil: I'll also pay for the Champagne.
Yes, it will have to exceed the numbers provided for the 2000 celebrations for the Queen Mother's 100th birthday.
Ing, Jenna, and Eric will also have to be there: my way of especially thanking them for seeing me, last July.
Mark your calendars: FEBRUARY 2, 2012.

Phil: I'll leave the 2025 Celebration, for Elizabeth's Centennial Celebration, to those who portrayed her predecessor namesake (Glenda Jackson, Judy Dench, Cate Blanchett, etc).
happy.gif


John Clifford
 

Pat Cook

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Apr 27, 2000
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For some reason I have an image in my mind of a woodpecker going to a high school prom...
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Don't forget Frank Aks who was I believe, 10 months old- and a BIG baby boy-he said he was 13 pounds when he was born. He gave many after dinner speeches on his life as the "Titanic Baby". His piece de resistance was the episode onboard when the poor grief-stricken lady who insisted Frank was her baby amidst the indignant cry of Leah Aks. She had after all, looked after him in the lifeboat. Mrs. Aks, thinking her baby gone, heard his cries on deck and saw her son in the arms of this strange woman.The ship doctor aboard Carpathia took the infant to his cabin and sure enough the strawberry birth mark Leah had described was there. Frank (a.k.a. "Philly") would then turn a bit pink when he added, "And of course, being a Jewish baby boy, I was...ah... circumsized!" Makes me wonder if this practice was NOT common back in Edwardian times for non-Jewish baby boys! My, the things we ponder here at ET!
 

Tracy Smith

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Apr 20, 2012
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From what I understand, circumcision among gentile boys, American, British, and European, was quite uncommon before the Second World War. Nowadays, being uncircumcised is much less common, regardless of ethnic background or religion, at least in the US.

I read somewhere that the Nazis sometimes made men whom they suspected as trying to "pass" as Gentiles to drop their pants for "inspection".
 

Arne Mjåland

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Oct 21, 2001
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The angry old woman who claimed to be the youngest survivor.

Journalist Michael Grundy in Worcester Evening News, England sent me an article he had written about 14 years ago: Called "Memory Lane"
He introduced the article to me like that:
"Ellen Mary Walker became something of an angry old lady in the years immediately after the enclosed newspaper feature. She was increasingly frustrated by the refusal of the Titanic Association to recognize her, and she failed to with legal moves to get a birth certificate showing Henry Morley as her father.
She is still (March 2002) alive, but is now in an old peoples home in Worcester. Unfortunately he mind has gone."

The article:
Seventy-six year old Ellen Mary Walker, who believes she is the youngest survivor of the Titanic disaster, has just seen a photograph of her father for the first time ever - thanks to "Memory Lane".
Here is a remarkable story. She was almost certainly conceived during the fateful maiden voyage of the giant luxery liner as a Worcester and Malvern shop owner ran off to San Fransisco with one of his pretty assistants.
Henry Samuel Morley - aged 40, affluent and leaving behind him a wife and 12 year old doughter - was planning to start up a new life in California whth Kate Florence Phillips, then just 19.
But he went down with the Titanic while Kate was bundled abroad the last lifeboat to leave the sinking liner and was rescued by the Carpathia and taken to New York. She returned to Worcester where nine months after the Titanic voyange she gave birth to Ellen Mary at a house in Waterworks Road.
Among Ellens treasured possessions to-day are three poignant reminders of the Titanic - the valuable sapphirer , diamond and silver necklace her mother wore on the liner and the purce she carried, still with her cabin keys inside.
Ellen says her father, together with his brother , owned confectionery shops in Worcester, Malvern and Birmingham, while her mother was one of the assistants at the Morley shop opposite the railway station in Foregate Street.
Before the couple eloped on the Titanic, Henry Morley sold off two of his shops to make adequate financial provision for the future of his wife and her doughter he was leaving and also to give he and Kate cash to start their life in America. It was money which also went to the bottom of the ocean... in the titanic safe. Henry and kate sailed on the liner as second class passengers in the assumed names of "Mr and mrs Marshall." The Titanic went down omn April 14 1912, and Ellen was born on January 11 1913.
This if first half of article. Before I may bring the rest here, I like to read your comments.
 
Nov 22, 2000
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Arne, I don't think anyone has ever doubted that Mrs Walker's parents were on the Titanic. The problem is that as a foetus, she cannot be termed the youngest "survivor" which is what she and those who have attempted to promote her story have claimed. To survive an event, as far as I'm concerned, you have to have been actually born.
As far as the authorities are concerned, they have refused to enter Morley's name on the birth certificate as there is no actual proof that she was conceived before, during or after the event. The full story is much more complicated than that published in the newspapers.

Geoff
 
May 8, 2001
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Well, weighing in after a much more knowledgeable person on this matter then myself, I couldn't really add much except the story is an interesting one. Hope you will share the second half of the story.
Sad to hear, if it is the truth, that her mind is gone.
 
Mar 15, 2001
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Geoff, getting back on the subject of Millvina Dean, exactly how is she doing now? Has she improved enough to ever make a visit back to the US in the future?
 

John Clifford

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Nov 12, 2000
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I do hope Millvina is doing well.

Phil, Geoff, Inger, and myself will, definitely, have to act as hosts for her 100th birthday.

BTW, Geoff, that means you, too, will have to rent a tux.
For George, we'll let him know that "Millvina is, truly, looking forward to seeing you there", and that will, probably, "lift his spirits such that he'll float over to Southampton".
happy.gif


John Clifford
 
Nov 22, 2000
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John, "rent a tux" my dear boy! I had to BUY a new tux to attend the celebrations in Texas earlier this year to commemorate Cooks' hundredth birthday celebrations. Since being measured for my last tux - oh why can't you Colonial chappies refer to them by their proper names?- I'm reliably informed by my tailor that rental companies no longer stock the size that I require, but now hire them out as marquees for weddings etc! So this one is with me for the duration - I may well request to be interred in it!
As to Millvina, I received a letter from her several weeks ago and she is in remarkable spirits - nothing ever seems to get her down - so indeed, plans will go ahead to celebrate her 100th.

Regards

Geoff
 
Nov 22, 2000
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Darren, Sad to say that Millvina no longer feels able to travel distances by any form of transport. Even short internal flights are a problem for her which is a shame but perfectly understandable.
Alma and I are off on Saturday to attend the 90th birthday celebrations in Southampton of Sid Sedunary, whose father, a third class steward was lost on the Titanic. Sid was, of course born posthumously. It has been arranged to present him with a portrait of his father, painted by an internationally known artist. Sid, like Millvina is full of fun and recently accompanied us on a tour of Canada - not bad for 89!

Regards

Geoff
 
May 8, 2001
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Geoff. Speaking for all... Please send all the best to Sid from the ET board.
So great to hear Millvina is going strong. What an inspiration she has become to many of us.
All these birthday celebrations... I suppose you believe you will be celebrating your 21st soon right?? ;-)