Mines bigger than yours


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Jim Trebowski

Guest
Did only the two millionare suites have private promenade decks? There are some sources that say there were some other suites with smaller ones.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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From what I can make out in the ships plans, the Millionaires suites were it for private promanades. These were located on B Deck. All the other staterooms on that deck extend out to the shell of the ship save for a few located in the forward part of the superstructure. There's an open space there, but I beleive it was publicly accessable.

What other spots did you have in mind?

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Jim Trebowski

Guest
Hi..thanks for the reply. I'm not really sure where, but some fellow cast members had read in one of the many books we have that there were some smaller ones..but as we know, there are a few books with blatantly wrong facts, sooo...domo arigato, Michael.
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BEN GREGO

Guest
OK, another kind of 'dumb' question; was ice cream, or sherbet, or any type of 'iced' dessert served on the Titanic???????????/
 
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Alex McLean

Guest
Ben,
You might want to check out the different meal menus given to the passengers. I'm not 100%, but I think there is something similar to that on this site, or at least a link to it somewhere.
Personally though, I doubt either icecream or sherbet were served (almost positive about the sherbet), but some of the deserts did have a sugar coating.
My best,
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Alex
 
Nov 9, 2002
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Hey All,
The Titanic Actually carried 1,750 quarts of Ice cream. I used to work in an Ice Cream shop and I have to say that 1,750 quarts is ALOT OF ICECREAM! lol.
 

Lee Gilliland

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Feb 14, 2003
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If you look carefully at the plans for G-Deck, in the refrigeration area, there was one whole freezer marked for Ice Cream only, right next to the Ice one and across from the ice-making machines. Strange to think of ice-making machines on the Titanic.
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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Hallo Ben - I responded to your query on the 7 April, but the post was wiped in the hack.

Both American and French ice cream were served aboard - Samuel pointed out the 'American ice cream' entry, and in First Class we find, for example, on the 14 April that French ice cream was on the menu (Archbold and McCauley provide some interesting general background on ice cream in 'Last Dinner on the Titanic', including Dolly Madison's famed role in the history of its development in America).

Punch Romaine also appears on the menu - a sorbet-like palate cleanser served between the fifth and seventh courses.
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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How about eleven courses in the First-Class dining saloon, Amanda?

First course - Hors D'Oeuvre
Second Course - Soups
Third Course - Fish
Fourth Course - Entrees
Fifth Course - Removes
Sixth Course - Punch or Sorbet
Seventh Course - Roast
Eighth Course - Salad
Ninth Course - Cold Dish
Tenth Course - Sweets
Eleventh Course - Dessert

And then of course the coffee and cigars...
 
Jan 28, 2003
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I once went to a dinner which recreated one of Mrs. Beeton's dinner menu's - it was desperate stuff. After five of the twelve courses people would have betrayed their countries to leave the table. And nobody was in a corset. I think the rich just pecked in those days. My gran was a maid in the 1900's, and she said huge amounts of waste went back to the kitchen, and vagrants used to call late at night for a bit of the left-overs (at the kitchen door via the 'area', of course).
 

Lee Gilliland

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The same thing happened to many of us at the THS dinner this year - it was all delicious, but it kept coming and coming. I think each of us at the table refused at least one course each, and we still had problems!
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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I've done a few of those, Monica - particularly with European friends, and some in older upstate NY families. More commonly now it's a theme dinner - much as one might hold a Murder Mystery Night (or a Titanic dinner party) there are Victorian or Edwardian dinner parties. I was delegated by a friend in York to supply the cheeses served on board the Titanic for one such gathering - even with York's lovely specialist cheesemongers, I came up short on one or two items on the list.

I've read studies that suggest that the Victorian/Edwardian consumption of calories was far greater than it is now, and yet obesity is a greater problem for us today. Of course, there are all sorts of variables and exceptions in that generalisation - modern sedentary lifestyles, the idea of earlier generations that excess weight equated to affluence or that, in some circles, a woman was expected to eat like a bird in public. Still, it's interesting that the middle and upper classes tended to eat more but weighed less.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Still, it's interesting that the middle and upper classes tended to eat more but weighed less.<<

I wonder how much of that would have had something to do with the popular emphesis and trends towards fitness. An Olympic class liner for example had among other things a swimming bath, turkish bath, gymnasium, and a squash court. At home, these people would have enjoyed all sorts of sports. Since there was no concept of such things as vidio games and other distractions cherished by modern day couch potatos, what else was there to do but work out?
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Yah - that's what I meant by my reference to a modern sedentary lifestyle. And not so much organised sports and fitness engaged in by previous generations - we have more than ample facilties along those lines (says she with the gym membership, personal trainer, pilates classes, running routine etc etc). It's more a case of incidental exercise which is missing from modern lives - we send emails instead of walking to a colleague's desk, we use the lift instead of the stairs, we drive to the shops instead of walk. TV consumes a lot of time. That's all part of the picture, although not the entire truth.
 

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