Miscastings

L

Luke Owens

Member
There are at least two miscastings in this little flick that annoy the hell out of me.

First and most importantly, the casting of Bernard Fox as Archibald Gracie. Gracie was NOT a bumbling Anglo-Indian colonel; he was the scion of an American family, at that time based in Mobile, Alabama, although his ancestry included the namesake Archibald Gracie who built Gracie Mansion in New York.

The other was Kathy Bates as Molly Brown. Much as I like Ms. Bates, she was NOT Molly Brown in any way, shape, or form. The real Molly, for example, would not have taken Jack under her wing in the way the movie showed her doing. Furthermore, her interaction in the lifeboat with Quartermaster Hichens was NOT what happened, according to the actual records.

Does anyone else have favourite miscastings of historical people?

Luke
 
Those aren't miscastings. Those are mischaracterizations and it was Cameron's fault for furthering the stereotypes. Bates would have made a good Molly Brown with better writing.

I wouldn't say it's a favorite...but I can't STAND Jonathan Hyde's portrayal and the writing that make up Ismay. He may as well have had a handlebar moustache and tied Rose to a railroad track. Shameless.
 
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With the correct writing and teachings I think Kathy Bates could've made for a very good Molly Brown.

The interaction between her and Quartermaster Higgins did annoy me. It would've been much better and dramatic had they followed the records.

>>>I wouldn't say it's a favorite...but I can't STAND Jonathan Hyde's portrayal and the writing that make up Ismay. He may as well have had a handlebar moustache and tied Rose to a railroad track. Shameless.<<<

I must admit that gave me a very interesting and odd mental image.
 
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>>With the correct writing and teachings I think Kathy Bates could've made for a very good Molly Brown.<<

With the correct writing and and teachings it would be hoped that she could've made for a very good Mrs. J.J. Brown instead of a "Molly" Brown.

>>>I wouldn't say it's a favorite...but I can't STAND Jonathan Hyde's portrayal and the writing that make up Ismay. He may as well have had a handlebar moustache and tied Rose to a railroad track. Shameless.<<<

I suppose one good thing could be said about the 1953 "Titanic".....Ismay and Andrews did not appear in that movie so you can't accuse them of miscasting. LOL.
 
>> I suppose one good thing could be said about the
>> 1953 "Titanic".....Ismay and Andrews did not
>> appear in that movie so you can't accuse them of
>> miscasting. LOL.

Right. But we still had to endure the foghorn and Navajo Rag.
 
>>Right. But we still had to endure the foghorn and Navajo Rag.<<

And don't forget "Far above Cayuga's waters", too ! Of course it's a well known fact that the Titanic would not have hit the iceberg (or vice versa) if Captain Smith had been on the Bridge instead of down in the Lounge smoking his pipe and listening to American College Songs !
 
P.S.

>>Right. But we still had to endure the ....Navajo Rag.<<

Curiously enough, some "web surfing" turned up some information that "Navajo Rag" was a real number on the hit parade of 1911....
 
>> if Captain Smith had been on the Bridge instead
>> of down in the Lounge smoking his pipe and
>> listening to American College Songs !

Much like Jack and Rose giving the lookouts a peep show thus distracting them.

>> "Navajo Rag" was a real number on the hit
>> parade of 1911....

That doesn't make it any less annoying and offensive.
 
>>the Titanic would not have hit the iceberg (or vice versa)<<

Or:
"Did we hit it ?"
"No Sir....It hit us !"

>>That doesn't make it any less annoying and offensive.<<
 
Speaking of miscasting, directors are not only guilty of miscasting persons, but sometimes matching up locations.

There was a movie a few years ago in which the location for the home of one of the main characters was in one of the most poverty ridden areas and her "neighborhood church" was filmed in one of the most affluent churches in the area. (Probably no one but a native would have noted this, but the movie was filmed locally and I was familiar with both locations.)
 
I've always been bothered by Benjamin Guggenheim's portrayal in the 1997 film. The actor who played him seemed almost elderly to me, but I believe the real Guggenheim was 47 years old at the time.

Of course, there are a number of other things that "bug" me about the film (I recently watched it for the first time in more than 10 years), but I'm sure they've been addressed previously by others!
 
I'm of the mindset that Titanic 97 is 10x better on the big screen. You overlook things because you're caught up in the spectacle and scope.

Certain movies *belong* on the big screen such as Ben Hur, Jaws, others...Titanic 97 is in that group.
 
Michael Ensign, the actor who played Benjamin Guggenheim in the film, was 52 (hardly elderly!) when Titanic started filming, so there wasn't that much of a difference in age.
 
But Ensign *looked* old. The general audience isn't going to check his drivers license.
 
Guggenheim was in his mid-forties. Ten years (or so) made a big difference back then.
 
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