Miss Kreuchen


Ben Holme

Member
Feb 11, 2001
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Hi Daniel,

I understand now. You're saying it is more likely that the Futrelles occupied an inside cabin forward of the aft staircase. Got it! Sorry, I didn't pay enough attention to the cabin numbers you mentioned.

Ben
 

Dave Hudson

Member
Apr 25, 2001
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re Park Lane:
On E Deck amidships, there were two corridors that transversed it. The starboard corridor was a simple passenger hallway and was of normal width. To my knowledge, it had no nickname, for it was a average First Class corridor. The port corridor was much wider and extened nearly the entire length of E Deck. It was a crew passage that allowed for easy access to all parts of the ship. It was also used secondarily as a third class passageway that connected the aft public rooms with the forward accomadation. It had two nicknames. To the officers and deck staff, it was Park Lane. To the stokers and engineering staff, it was Scotland Road.
re Kreunchen:
I would assume that she would have to have been forward of the main stairs. If it were aft of them, they would have been underwater before her cabin, and she would have had to escape via a crew or second class stair. Elisabeth Walton Allen would have surely mentioned this in her account.
I do agree, however that it is strange for her to be in such an isolated part of the deck. My guess is that the remaining cabins on forward E Deck were booked, but that the occupants were upgraded to better unoccupied rooms. This is practiced often on modern cruise ships too. The line wants to keep the cheapest rooms open, for they are usually the most popular. To do this,they upgrade those passengers to keep the rooms empty. Also, it is known that Titanic was rather empty on her maiden voyage, so there was room. They probably didn't upgrade Ms. Kreunchen because she wasn't really a passenger, she was a maid.
Another interesting possibility is that she was placed forward of the Grand Staircase in order to be closer to the stairs further forward that Rolf metioned. These stairs were actually meant for D Deck access to the Squash Court. Perhaps Mrs. Edward Scott Robert was in a forward cabin on D Deck, close to these small stairs. This would have been very conviniant for her maid, and would explain why Mr. Chambers never saw her. She would have had no reason to use the Grand Staircase. I would guess that she occupied one of 4 cabins: E 200, E 201, E 202, or E 203.
Just some thoughts
David.
 
Jul 20, 2000
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David,

According to the Cave List Mrs Robert and her daughter and neice were in rooms B-3 and B-5. Although he got theirs names wrong their presence in rooms in the forward section of B-deck was confirmed by Steward Crawford.

I hope this helps,
Lester
 

Ben Holme

Member
Feb 11, 2001
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Hi David,

Could you tell me where you found the info regarding Park Lane? I understand that Walter Lord believed that "Park Lane" and "Scotland Road" referred to the same port corridor, but other books suggest "Park Lane" referred to the first class smaller corridor. Personally, I think the latter explantion seems more likely. "Park Lane" doesn't seem a particularly appropriate description for a corridor used by 3rd class passengers and crew. But I could be wrong..

Regards,
Ben
 
R

Rolf Vonk

Guest
Hi there,

I have no clue about that park lane thing, but Miss Kreuchen's cabin allocation seems certainly to be in one of the most forward parts of E deck. Why not in an inside cabin in the main corridor? Like Mr Millet or Mr Anderson. In such a cabin she wouldn't have been isolated. Most probably their were many more passengers in those cabins on E deck. David, I understand your thoughts about E 200/203. However I don't think she was in one of those 4-berth cabins. In my opinion it could only be possible when she shared her cabin with other passengers/maids. Mrs Robert paid a very high price for the tickets (as Daniel said too, it was enough to place the party in a B deck suite) and it could even be possible that she placed Miss Kreuchen in an outside cabin in the forward part of E deck.

Many regards,
Rolf
 
R

Rolf Vonk

Guest
Hi Jan,

Thanx for posting that link. It's a well-looking residence. Is that house in an area for well to do's? Not that it would make any difference when Miss Kreuchen wasn't rich or so, but I'm just interested.

I saw some points about Titanic II on that website. Really interesting!! I searched for it on the web, but I didn't find anything till now.

Regards,
Rolf
 

Dave Hudson

Member
Apr 25, 2001
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Ben,
I read about Park Lane and Scotland Road being the same in ANTR, but have heard it said from a lot of people. The officers and the engineers were two very independant groups on early liners. They often called things by different names. The engineering staff were mostly from lower class Scotish or Irish backgrounds, and so they identified the corridor with Scotland Road. The Officers were mainly from Southampton or other places in England, and so they associated it with Park Lane. I don't think that they called it Park Lane for its grandeur, but rather for the importance. Park Lane, just like the corridor, was a major road that took you to many important places.
The E Deck cabin hallway connected the cheapest First Class rooms on the cheapest deck, and would have been hardly deserving of recognition. If any cabin hallway had a nickname, I would think it would have been the B Deck hall, since it connected the finest suites.
David.
 
Jun 4, 2003
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why were such "cheap" first class staterooms so down in e-deck? were they similar to second class rooms? who would choose them and why? perhaps business travelers who did no0t care for luxuries or who else? personally, if i had a wife with me i would pick b or c deck staterooms!!!
 
J

João Carlos Pereira Martins

Guest
George, I don't think business travelers would disregard the luxuries. They would reach New York at the same time as the holiday's passengers, so, why not have fun or relax during this days, taking advantage from the ship's facilities? I remember you that, for example, for third class passengers this crossing was a kind of holidays, they knew that a hard-working life was waiting for them in America.

Regarding the E-deck cabins, I don't know why people picked them, but my knowledge says me they were build to put some first class passengers when the main decks (B, C and D) were booked solid. It was a restricted area near the Grand Staircase, and I suppose they were quite similar to second class cabins, a bit better, perhaps, but with an identical décor. Hope it helps.

Best regards, João
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>Regarding the E-deck cabins, I don't know why people picked them,<<

Likely as not, they chose those particular accomodations because that was what they could reasonably afford or perhaps even because they wanted to pinch a few pennies.
 

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