Mixing of the classes


Allie Flynn

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Aug 1, 2005
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I was just wondering if the classes mixed at all
I dont mean like in the titanic movie or anything but I would love to know!!!
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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No, they didn't. That's what they paid different fares for. Also, third class passengers were subject to Board of Trade regulations that prescribed where they could go.

Lawrence Beesley mentions the curious case of a man who travelled third class while his wife was in second class. They used to meet and talk at the barrier between classes. I've never worked out who this was. Any ideas?
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Hello Dave,

My guess is that the couple were Susan Webber and one of the Braund brothers. - There is an old thread on this. See under Searching; Keyword Search; Webber.

Hope you are keeping well.
Regards,
Lester
 

Bob Godfrey

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A strong possibility is Nils Johansson and his fiance, Olga Lundin. They had boarded together as 3rd Class passengers, but when Olga suffered badly from motion sickness Nils paid for an upgrade to a more comfortable cabin location for her in 2nd Class. His money wouldn't stretch to an upgrade for himself also.
 

Noel F. Jones

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Then there's that tale of the lottery winner who was invited to dine at the captain's table.

His response was "What? - pay all this money and eat with the crew? Not bloody likely".

Noel
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Michael,

It is my understanding that Olga shows on this web-site as a 2nd Class passenger because Hermann accepts that she upgraded from 3rd Class and shows her as such on his PL which is the basis for E-T's PL. - In conflict with Olga's Person Summary her E-T biography confirms that Olga boarded as a 3rd Class passenger. - She paid the same fare as that paid by Nils Johansson [a 3rd Class fare].

All WS records list Olga as 3rd Class and she is also on the Carpathia Lists [that is the lists of Titanic survivors] as 3rd Class.
 
Feb 24, 2004
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>>I was just wondering if the classes mixed at all

Not as a rule. But every once in a while, some adventuresome 1st- or 2nd-class passenger would find his/her way below decks. It was a form of "slumming" for people looking for a "good time," much the way Rose did in the movie. It wasn't encouraged, and it certainly didn't work the other way, but it happened. My great aunt did it as a young woman on her way over here from Scotland. Scotland the Brave!

I've run this question by Don Lynch and Rick Archbold, and I'm told Maxtone-Graham writes about it as well.

Roy
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>and I'm told Maxtone-Graham writes about it as well.<<

Yep, he did. Can't give you a specific citation but that's where I first heard about it. While it wasn't encouraged, the impression I have is that it was something of a winked at practice.
 

Noel F. Jones

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This reminds me of the nouveau-riche 'celebrity' who, upon being informed by the head waiter that he was invited to dine at the captain's table, expostulated "What? I'm not paying all this money just to eat with the crew".

Sorry about that.

Noel
 

Steve Olguin

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There is a children's novel that I read in which the fictional character's mother was doing just this -- she was a second class passenger (who would have been traveling first class on another ship) who happened to befriend a woman in steerage. Well, on the night of April 14th, she was down visiting her friend and ended up getting locked behind a gate. Fictional story, but I am curious as to if this may have happened at all.
 

Noel F. Jones

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Steve,

Such a barrier would have a key either side in a glass-fronted cabinet - 'break glass in an emergency'.

And nobody gets locked down; there are always stairways. Aspire upwards and you will find freedom.

Noel
 
Feb 24, 2004
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And Noel, hasn't it been shown that most (!) of the gates on Titanic were of the waist-high variety? Not the full-height ones shown in the movie, although there were a few of those? In an "orderly" society, there's no need to play rough.

In my experience during the 60s, riding the train between Seattle and Chicago, simple gates were all that separated the Pullman passengers from the coach passengers. They were there mostly as a reminder and I never witnessed any problems.

Roy
 

Cara Ginter

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Aug 7, 2005
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Would it have been possible, if one so greatly desired? I mean by sneaking around of course.
If so, how would one have gone about doing this. Say, leaving second or third class, to pay a trip to first. Or vice versa.
In the Titanic movie, what they did, would that have been possible? Jack going to dinner with them, and Rose in return going to third class to partake of their party? How would this have been accomplished?
Cara
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Cara, this is on another thread somewhere. I believe the consensus was that on some ships there was limited mixing of the classes.

The writer R A Fletcher in Travelling Palaces warns first class passengers against intruding on lower classes. He calls it,"...a shocking exhibition of bad manners and low inquisitiveness."

There's more on this in John Maxstone-Graham's The Only Way to Cross. The bad manners seem to have been commoner in the earlier years.

The movie is not worth worrying about. Rose and Jack did all sorts of things that passengers were not permitted to do. From the flying scene on the bow to the attempted suicide scene on the poop, reality is ignored for the sake of what is jokingly called a plot.
 
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Cara Ginter

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Aug 7, 2005
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Thanks very much. It was confusing me, because I didn't think it altogether likely, or possible for that matter.
happy.gif

Cara
 
Feb 24, 2004
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>>The writer R A Fletcher in Travelling Palaces warns first class passengers against intruding on lower classes. He calls it,"...a shocking exhibition of bad manners and low inquisitiveness."

But some of them did it anyway. . . .
'-)

Roy
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>because I didn't think it altogether likely, or possible for that matter.<<

Oh it was possible. Anyone who really wanted to could get around to all kinds of forbidden areas if they tried hard enough, but as mentioned, it was considered to be excruciatingly bad manners. The practice was...if I recall correctly...known as "slumming" and was strongly discouraged.
 
Dec 31, 2005
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I think the restrictions were unquestionable,because according to it's design,Titanic had three elevators for first class and one for second class.
 

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