Modern Brands

Sam Brannigan

Member
Feb 24, 2007
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One of the great tragedies of modern times was changing the name of Marathon to Snickers (who's ever heard of the Battle of Snickers, or run in the London Snickers?).

Worcester sauce is lovely, chuck it on your cheese on toast!

'bout ye James.

Ever smoked Woodbines? I've got a couple of old metal advertising hordings floating about. By the sound of things you needed an extra lung to smoke them.

Regards

Sam
 

Paul Rogers

Member
Nov 30, 2000
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West Sussex, UK
In my mis-spent youth, I went through a phase of smoking Woodbines (or coffin nails as they were commonly known). You could feel your life force ebbing away after each puff! We must've thought it was soooo cool, coughing and chucking up 'round the back of the bike sheds at school.

Whilst we're on the subject of name changes, who dreamed up the idea to change Opal Fruits into Starburst? And Treats into Minstrels!

Bring back Fruit Salads, Shetbet Dabs and Ice Pops, that's what I say!

Regards,
Paul.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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I remember reading about Woodbines in an Agatha Christie book- and also something called Players brand ciggies. Am busy working on another webpage of brandname labels and advertising from 1912- the packages and cans ( that would be packets and tins to you all!) are truly works of art -stay tuned- am laid up on crutches for a few days so I feel a prolific mouseclicking session coming on!)
 
Nov 22, 2000
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Shell & Paul, Oooh this takes me back to my youth! Who remembers "Five Boys" chocolate which pictured little boys from smiling through to crying? Palma Violets (I've just found a supplier!!) and Flying Saucers...but enough of this, I'm on a diet, have to lose two stone of ugly fat...Alma suggested I remove my head!
 
J

James Maxwell

Guest
Sam bout ye
Yep I have smoked Woodbines and your right you needed an iron lung to smoke them - but I wised up and took up pipesmoking instead - and while we're on that subject in those days there was St Bruno Flake, Erinmore and Bingo Bar, pipesmoking would have been more popular than cigarettes in those day's.
James
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Valentines conversation hearts have been around since 1866-who knew?! NECCO (New England Confectionery Company) started up in 1847 by the Chase brothers in Boston. The familiar candy wafers in 5 flavors appeared in 1901, after Chase invented a lozenge cutting machine. These were so popular Admiral Byrd took 2 1/2 tons of them to the South Pole so his men could have unspoilable candies for 2 years. The conversaton hearts were at first called "motto" hearts and had little sayings like "Be Mine", "I Love You", "Marry Me" and such sentiments. Every decade added their own jargon from the 20's "Atta Boy" and "Oh You Kid", to the 50's "Cool Man"- I just ran out and bought a bag and am feeling historical sitting here looking through them. Do you have these in the UK? Imagine, our Titanic folks also munched on these and exchanged little boxes of them- hard to believe. Happy Valentine's Day.
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Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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By a stupendous effort I cast my mind back to the '50s and '60s and recall these in the UK as 'love hearts'. But they weren't heart-shaped - just discs with the heart as a raised line. And the mottos were the original ones, not the updated versions. Not that I ever bought them, of course - strictly for girlies!
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Oh Bob- not just for girlies! I must send you some for Friday! And while we are at it- Hershey kisses are ALSO Gilded Age goodies. Dear old Milton Hershey of the Chocolate Empire in Pennsylvania, invented the KISS in 1907. These were so named due to the kissing sound made when the machine extruded the chocolate on the conveyor belt. Then the morsels past through a cooling tunnel for 18 minutes before being wrapped in aluminum foil. Purists will go for the original silver foil although colored holiday foils recently have boosted sales. The familiar Hershey "plume" on top was patented in 1924 and the total image not patented until 1976. Hershey also made a vanilla-flavored chocolate treat with a heart on the base back in 1900-1918 called "Sweethearts" and another similar product called "Silverpoints" in 1918-1929. The only time Hershey's shut down production was for the war effort from 1942-49 due to the country's need for metal foil. Twelve BILLION kisses are made annually in Pennsylvania and Oakdale California. Almonds appeared inside in 1990 and the new "Hugs"-white chocolate kisses came out in 1993.
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XXOO
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Less romantically, when I'm researching, I keep finding ads for Harley Davidson motorbikes. They brag about the extra travel in the seat springs. Real high tech!

I remember what called conversation lollies in Oz. I'll see if they are still around. I think they came in different shapes.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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Dave, most American vehicles of the period had extra travel in the seat springs. Some researchers believe this to be a modification made necessary by the huge success of Hershey chocolate products. Others put it down to the effectiveness of the 'love hearts'.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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Shelley, thanks for the kind offer of a food parcel, even though it's for girlies. :) In return I'll send you a stick of Whitby rock. Do you know about seaside 'rock', or is that a peculiarly British treat unknown in the Colonies?
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Fascinating link above that was Bob. I believe the Brit version is somewhat different than the American one. Shops here in the states seem to call rock that crystalline clear sugar stuff. Sometimes tinted, usually on a lolly stick- this is what I have thought of as rock candy. It has been around in Persia since the 1200's, even Shakespeare chimes in, in 1596, in Henry IV about the therapeutic qualities of rock candy to soothe the throats of long-winded talkers. The oldest candy company in America opened in 1806 in Salem Massachusets-I visit there often and enjoy their oldest running product, Gibralters, peppermint or lemon flavor, which were popular with seamen. Called the Old Pepper Candy Company, it was actually started by an Englishwoman named Spencer who was shipwrecked off the coast and started her American candy venture from a wheelbarrow in the streets of Salem. The store passed on to Mr. Pepper and you can read all about it at
http://www.yeoldepeppercandy.com
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Whitby Rock? Forgot to ask what that is- Whitby is my most favorite spot on the planet and I am an avid jet collector. Whitby also has quite a collection of shipwrecks off the jagged coast and one of the most heroic lifesaving squads ever. I remember seeing the monument to them at St. Mary's up on the cliffs near the Abbey. Recently Whitby was featured in the Gwen Paltrow movie POSSESSION (a nice Gilded Age film) and is also featured in Bram Stoker's novel Dracula. The film version with Frank Langella is the only one to actually film in Whitby which follows the novel. I learned all about Whitby parkin too- which seems awfully like gingerbread Old Beans!
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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Shelley, that site should carry a public health warning - I've put on weight just reading it. Take no notice of the statement on my link that seaside rock is sold in a bag. The only authentic form is the 'stick of rock', about a foot long, sealed in cellophane with a twist at each end. Usually also a crudely-printed photo of the seaside pier for the town in question is slipped between the wrapper and the rock. And to understand how it's made by hand you have to WATCH the process; words cannot do justice.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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And of course Whitby gave us Captain Cook and his ship, the Endeavour, was a Whitby collier. (No, that's not OUR Cook - but rumour has it they were father and son. Not sure which one was the father).
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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Shelley, I'm sure you are familiar with the photographic study of Whitby folk made by Frank Sutcliffe in the nineteenth century. Anybody who isn't can see some of his pictures here:

http://www.sutcliffegallery.com.au/gallery.html

Includes a superb portrait of Henry Freeman, only survivor of the 13-man crew of the Whitby lifeboat following a disastrous rescue attempt in 1861 - that's the story behind the monument.

Hope we're not wandering too far off topic - I've heard the moderator round here is a real hardcase, but the magic word is Whitby!