Modern Brands

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Further research shows that conversation lollies are still made in Australia. I'll see if I can find any.

In Cambridge Mass somebody is making a modern version with messages for the computer age, like "e-mail me".

I know the candy sticks with the name in the centre as Blackpool Rock. Whether it originated there is another thing. Today it's made in many places.

One curiosity I spotted in my researches was a special Gillette razor for women. They appeared soon after the original version for men. Apparently sleeveless dresses were becoming fashionable. No doubt Randy can give the story.
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Bob, you're obviously on to my taste for silly songs. My "taste" runs to extremes. I can sing you Winterreise or The Bastard King of England
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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A fine repertoire, Dave, and a testament to the diversity of a Sunday School education. Try that link again and hit the 'previous' button for another George Formby classic.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Gillette introduced the ladies' shaver in 1915. In centuries past courtesans found various means to remove unsightly hair from straight razors to clam shells. It would seem that some countries have different standards of beauty and hairy-ness is actually desirable in some Mediterranean countries. Gillette 's motive was purely profit-driven. The advent of short skirts and sleeveless dresses in the 20's was a great incentive to "smoothe away unwanted hair." Loved the Blackpool Rock poem!
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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I think the ad I saw was from 1915. I was looking at things like Lusitania and the Titanic civil case. I just love those old papers. Apart from the ads, they tell us a lot about the preoccupations of the time.
 
May 8, 2001
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Too much fun.. I know I don't chime in often, but certainly enjoy the Gilded age chats down here!
Now, if only I could find some Hersheys Kisses!
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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They say the past is a another country where they do things differently.

I'm old enough and was raised in sufficiently poor circumstances (violin in background, sobbing offstage) to have a feeling for the period. I don't have to imagine having no radio, TV or refrigerator. I know what it's like to live in a world almost without plastics. I know the joys of walking almost everywhere, or taking a tram. I also remember the suffocating religiosity of years ago and the influence of what we Aussies call wowsers.

What 1912 looks like to somebody now aged 20 or so, I find hard to imagine. Another planet?
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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I don't know your age, Dave, but I guess we were growing up at about the same time. Our terraced house in the early '50s had no electricity, hot water or inside toilet. A tin bath hung on the outside wall alongside the mangle, and the most sophisticated technology in the house, apart from the wireless set, was the gas lighting and a bicycle parked in the hallway.

In terms of distance, looking back to the Titanic disaster and the age of Edwardian elegance was like looking back today to the Kennedy assassination and the Beatles. And most significantly, we were a lot closer to the Edwardian attitudes and values that must seem so strange to more youthful members.

That's why us oldies are useful on a Titanic forum - we were almost there! But do we have anybody who goes back further? It would be interesting to know if we have members who lived through the '30s or even the '20s.