Modern cruise ships + MIR submersibles


NCSDirector

Member
Sep 7, 2018
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Hey guys, I've always been interested in Titanic and last month I went on my first ever cruise, we departed from (what I THINK) is near the same berth Titanic left from all those years ago. There's a really powerful feeling that's almost unexplainable, knowing that same ship went through the Solent and the same waters you have, over 100 years ago and it still hasn't reached it's destination and never will. It's prompted me to come on and ask some questions I've always wondered about but never got around to asking.

1) Apart from the lack of lifeboats, Titanic seemed to sink in a "controlled" way. It sank on a more or less even keel, managing to launch every single lifeboat before foundering. It's my understanding that most other ships tend to capsize to one side during sinking, and that Titanic is unique in that respect. Is there any reason for this? Was it the design of the bulkheads? If for example a modern cruise ship suffered the exact same damage Titanic did (I know it's not likely because of radar/sonar/modern tech but just assume somehow it happened) would they sink on an even keel, being able to launch every lifeboat and (because of the SOLAS regulations) have a good chance at saving all lives onboard?


2) The MIR (not sure if they are called that?) submersibles/submarines that visit the wreck site are said to be very well armoured/reinforced against the pressure of the water. At that depth, apparently it's something like 6,000 pounds per square inch. Assume that the glass cracked and broke, what would being exposed to the water pressure at that depth be like? Would the unfortunate crew of the submersible have a split second of being aware what was happening or would it all happen so quick they would never even register it?
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>1) Apart from the lack of lifeboats, Titanic seemed to sink in a "controlled" way. It sank on a more or less even keel, managing to launch every single lifeboat before foundering. It's my understanding that most other ships tend to capsize to one side during sinking, and that Titanic is unique in that respect. Is there any reason for this? Was it the design of the bulkheads?<<

Very likely, that design of the bulkheads was at the very core of the reason the ship sank on a more or less even keel. The Olympic Class had transverse watertight bulkheads which permitted marginally even flooding of one side to the other as opposed to confining it to one side. Longitudinal bulkheads tend to confine it to one side such as what happened to the Lusitania when she was sunk and that ship rolled over to starboard as she went down.

As it happened, the Titanic became very unstable late in the sinking and nearly rolled over anyway, but by that time, most of the boats had been successfully launched with only two of the collapsibles remaining which had to be floated off.[/quote]
 

Mel Sharp

Member
Sep 18, 2018
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My, personal opinion is that the fact that she went down on a reasonably even keel is testament to how well designed she really was. I believe she may already have had a slight list to port prior to the accident due to uneven levels of coal and that may have in some way helped keep her stable as she started to flood on the starboard.
 

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