Moody did not want to join Titanic?

S

Sarah S

Member
Hello!

On Wikipedia it says that James Moody did not want to serve on the titanic and sent request to leave, which he was denied. Is this really true? Was Moody not happy to join the highly anticipated and cherished maiden voyage of the biggest ship of that time? I have read that all the other officers felt somewhat honored and excited to join the ship as it marked important steps in their careers (Murdoch assigned as the original chief and Lightoller as first officer for example).

If it is really true that Moody was unhappy to be on titanic, it would make his death even more tragic to me. Violet Jessop also commented that during the evacuation Moody looked weary and tired (understandably so, but still, it adds further drama to his story....). I am scared he felt totally uncomfortable to work on that ship or even hated it.

Does anybody know how Moody truly felt on the titanic, in the first few days of her journey and how he got along with his on-duty officers Boxhall and Murdoch? I know he had worked with lightoller and pitman before, if I am correct.


Thank you very much
 
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Seumas

Seumas

Member
What source does this wikipedia article cite for Moody not wanting to board the Titanic ?

If there is no source then it is not worth bothering about.

On the contrary, from the letters he wrote to his family before just after joining, Moody seems to have been quite happy to join the ship.
 
S

Sarah S

Member
This is the passage on wikipedia:
] In March 1912 he received word that he was to be assigned to RMS Titanic as her Sixth Officer. Moody was somewhat reluctant to accept the assignment as he had hoped to spend a summer on the Atlantic aboard the Oceanic, after having endured a harsh winter, and was also hoping to take leave. His request for leave was denied

as a source they cited this
  1. Sheil, Inger (2012). Titanic Valour: The Life of Fifth Officer Harold Lowe. The History Press. ISBN 9780752477701.
I did not read the book to check the passage but if it is written in Inger Sheils book then it must be a valid source
 
Seumas

Seumas

Member
It's been a while since I had a copy of Titanic Valour in my hands, but I have read and found Sheil's research to be of a high standard.

So I admit I could very well be wrong about Moody.
 
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S

Sarah S

Member
If anyone has any idea how Moody got along with his fellow titanic officers, it would be a joy for me to find out
 
Thomas Krom

Thomas Krom

Member
If anyone has any idea how Moody got along with his fellow titanic officers, it would be a joy for me to find out
Before sixth officer Moody was transferred to the Titanic he served on-board the RMS Oceanic, which was the first White Star Liner he ever served on. On-board the Oceanic he met captain Hebert Haddock, who took command of the Titanic temporarily while she was still in Belfast, first officer Charles Hebert Lightoller, who was the temporary first officer of the Titanic who was demoted to the position of a second officer after chief officer Wilde became the chief officer of the Titanic and fourth officer Hebert John Pitman, who was the third officer of the Titanic. Also a familiar face to sixth officer Moody would have been Titanic’s senior wireless operator John George Phillips who served on the Oceanic as well while Moody was serving on-board.



It seems that sixth officer Moody befriended fifth officer Harold Godfrey Lowe on-board the Titanic, who’s life he indirectly saved by suggesting that Lowe would man lifeboat number 14 (“You go, I will get in another boat.”). It is perfectly possible that sixth officer Moody got to know fourth officer Joseph Groves Boxhall better as well since he shared his watch with him, however this is speculative.
 
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Dan Parkes

Dan Parkes

Member
Moody had asked for leave to visit Paris in March 1912, to see his friend, a Mr. Selby, who he described as a 'Yankee friend.' The White Star Line declined his request as he was assigned as Titanic's Sixth Officer and Moody wrote: "We can’t have big ships and holidays!"The reference is found in his correspondence (letters he wrote between 1904 - 1912, some of which are reprinted in Inger's excellent book on Lowe).

More information here: Titanic's Officers - RMS Titanic - Sixth Officer Moody
 
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S

Sarah S

Member
Moody had asked for leave to visit Paris in March 1912, to see his friend, a Mr. Selby, who he described as a 'Yankee friend.' The White Star Line declined his request as he was assigned as Titanic's Sixth Officer and Moody wrote: "We can’t have big ships and holidays!"The reference is found in his correspondence (letters he wrote between 1904 - 1912, some of which are reprinted in Inger's excellent book on Lowe).

More information here: Titanic's Officers - RMS Titanic - Sixth Officer Moody

Was Moody unhappy to be assigned on titanic, like did he totally dislike the idea on being there? Or was his request to leave "no big deal" and he was in the end actually excited to join the big ship?
 
Dan Parkes

Dan Parkes

Member
I think it is prudent not to read into it more than what he wrote - hindsight can be a dangerous perspective. He simply wanted leave to meet a friend in Paris and due to work he could not take it. He was duly impressed with the huge size of Titanic but did write about his cabin that his "room is no bigger than a broom cupboard.”
 
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