Morgue Photos from the Lusitania

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Kris Muhvic

Member
Lisa-

First, I do want to say I did not mean to give a lecture or anything...just some thoughts I wanted to share. Your words could easily have been my own. My Gr. Grandparents came over on ships just pre- Titanic, yes in steerage, and I wish they lived longer for me to know them better! They never went back...not even a thought it seems. They took the risk and, in spite of any hardships, knew their lives were better. I'm still trying to learn from them!

Well, good luck with your finals...and lurk away! Just come back- Ok?!

Take care-
Kris
 
T

Tarn Stephanos

Member
I have seen images of victims of the Empress of Ireland sinking. A shocking postcard of a pile of victims was issued. Lord knows why!

regards

Tarn Stephanos
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
Tarn, that postcard you alluded to just demonstrates that bad taste is timeless! God only knows why anyone would want such a picture, much less send it to somebody through the post. One can only imagine the impression it must have made on the recipiant.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Geoff Whitfield

Member
Tarn, The Empress photograph was also used in contemporary newspapers to depict victims of the Halifax explosion a couple of years later - seems anything gruesome like that sells papers!

Geoff
 
C

Colleen Collier

Member
Watch out Geoff's front too!
Smile

Good to see you are home safe and sound! Can't wait to hear about your latest adventure!
Colleen
 
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Ryan Patrick Thiessen

Member
Hello all!
I seem to remember seeing some of the aforementioned photos in a book on the Titanic that I own. As I am not sitting in my home right now I can't give the title or author but will get back on and give the info as soon as I can. I know, in any event, that I have seen photo's of Titanic's Dead. I will research as best I can and try to give more info as quickly as I can.
 
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Bill Wormstedt

Member
Ryan, the book with photographs of some of Titanic's dead is the second edition of Eaton & Haas' "Titanic: Triumph and Tragedy". The first edition does *not* have the photos of two of the recovered bodies.
 
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Ira Schafer

Member
Going back to the attitudes about death at the time of the Lusitania, I think it is important to remember that the Western World was in the midst of a great Christian Revival. because of the fact that most people had at least a rudimentary awareness of what the Bible teaches about the death of people trusting in Jesus Christ as their personal Savior and the Bible's teachings about Heaven as a place of rest and reunion of Believers, i think many people were more comfortable with death. they believed oftentimes that their separation from loved ones would be brief. The New testament teaches that for the believer, "To be absent from the body is to be present with the Lord." They still mourned and grieved, but, in general, they let mourning last only a short time. After all, they had busy lives to which to return. I think the major role of Christianity in our society is largely overlooked because most of our historical infois filtered through a media and public school juggernaut uninterested, and thus ignorant of, the Western World's more recent Christian heritage.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
Ira, please tread very lightly here.

Religious beliefs can be an extremely sensitive issue. This is a forum with an international following and membership and while you may not agree with the beliefs of others on matters of faith, you'll find just as many who disagree with yours and for the same reasons.
 
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Ira Schafer

Member
The question to which I was referring dealt with people's attitudes toward death at the time of the sinking. It was apropper explanation of some of the beliefs. You are, of course, welcome to your personal beliefs on the subject, but the general attitude of the time is a matter of public record, and, thus, history. The post answers properly a musing about how the people of the time dealt with their loss of loved ones. I was careful to point out that not all believed the same way. However, if you look at history objectively, you will find that most people in the Western World believed as I described. I made the comment as the simple historical fact that it is, Mr. Standart. While you may have a particular opinion as to what the Bible states, it does not change the fact that many people belived as I described. I discussed a simple historical fact that may shed some light on the individual's question. Please treat the comment as the historical fact that it is and nothing more.
 
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Ira Schafer

Member
On further thought, I think it is important to point out that other beliefs in the afterlife existed. First, let me go back to the question that prompted my comment: Lisa Harrod stated, "A random thought here- did those of the Edwardian Era have a healthier attitude toward death? It is impossible to discuss the question intelligently without discussing religion. Different religious beliefs are a historical fact of life and I treat them as such. It is true that widespread Christian Revival did exist in the Edwardian World. this is historical fact and a great many survivors and families undoubtedly relied on their Christian faith. The Bible reference "To be absent from the body is to be present with the Lord" is a fitting example of the Christian belief in the afterlife and a worthy answer to the question. However it is true that other belief systems had a wide audience in the Edwardian World and are also worthy of discussion in reference to the question. A belief that seemed to rival Christianity in the Edwardian World was Spiritualism. Spritualism chief advocate may have been a gentlemann by the name of Mesmer. As many may know, he advocated putting people in trances and conducting seances to reach the spirits of the dead through a medium. Many people claimed great success as mediums while others, mainly the wealthy, relied heavily on mediums and seances to converse with the dead. this belief that many held that they would be able to communicate with the dead was undoubtedly as much a comfort to those who believed in spiritualism as Biblical teaching were a comfort to Christians. Again, this is only a partial answer to Lisa's question. Many other answers and suggestions are worthy of discussion. I look forward to other people discussing what they believe may have been a spiritual comfort to the survivors of death during the Edwardian Era. I'm sure it will be an interesting and stimulating conversation from which we could all learn. Thanks, Lisa, for bringing up the topic. the topic is indeed important. Perhaps your question might have been better phrased, "What spiritual beliefs comforted those mourning death in the Edwardian Era? The answers are indeed varied.
 
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