Question Most survivors couldn't hear or feel the collision with iceberg. Why is that?


Curiosite

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I've read a few accounts, and each one of them stated that there was "no sound" or "just a light sound". Honestly, I'm confused. Why would the ripping of the hull by massive knives of ice not be heard or felt?
 
May 3, 2005
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I've read a few accounts, and each one of them stated that there was "no sound" or "just a light sound". Honestly, I'm confused. Why would the ripping of the hull by massive knives of ice not be heard or felt?
Probably (just a guess) their cabins were so far apart from the colission area that the sound was muffled.
 
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Scott Mills

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I've read a few accounts, and each one of them stated that there was "no sound" or "just a light sound". Honestly, I'm confused. Why would the ripping of the hull by massive knives of ice not be heard or felt?
This fact lends some credence to the grounding theory; however, what it really tells us that Titanic made very little contact with the ice--truly a glancing blow at best; maybe a better way to put this is the contact between Titanic and the ice was not enough contact cause a sudden change in Titanic's momentum. If it were, people would have noticed. They would have been thrown from their beds and bunks, and there would have been dozens (more really) cases of broken bones and other collision related injuries.

Unfortunately, the contact was still enough to fatally, or nearly fatally, damage Titanic's hull.
 
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Manuel93

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Molly Brown said she was thrown out of her bed when the ship hit the iceberg but I feel like it was an exageration...
 

Scott Mills

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She is the only person I know of who made such a claim. In other words, I suspect you are correct. Most of the people on Titanic did not feel it all, and the ones that did described it most often as a shudder or shaking reminiscent of a ship losing a propeller blade; and no one is being thrown out of bed by the loss of a propeller blade.
 
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Jeffrey Alan Dahl

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One passenger named Charles Edward Dahl claimed he was thrown from his bunk in his storie to the Ward County Independent.
 

yla

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Since most ( if not nearly all) 3rd class male passengers died that night, we will never know for sure. Male 3rd class passengers were housed in the bow section of titanic.

The off duty officers that night woke up to a slight bump. Officers were more far away from the impact then 3rd class men but closer then Mrs Margaret Brown.
 
Mar 22, 2003
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Since most ( if not nearly all) 3rd class male passengers died that night,
Lets stop spreading false information. First of all, a higher percentage of 2nd class men died, 92%, than 3rd class men, 87%. And 67% of 1st class men died. The number fatalities for women passengers are: 3% of 1st class, 13% of 2nd class, and 50% of 3rd class.
(All percentages rounded to whole numbers.)
 
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Mar 18, 2008
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Since most ( if not nearly all) 3rd class male passengers died that night, we will never know for sure. Male 3rd class passengers were housed in the bow section of titanic.
Actually it were the crew (firemen, stokers, trimmers who were at the bow before 3rd class passengers.


The off duty officers that night woke up to a slight bump.
It was only 3rd Officer Pitman who woke up due to sound of collision as he said. 2nd officer Lightoller had not fall alseep by that time and 5th Officer Lowe did not noticed anything about the collision.
 

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