Mother and baby

  • Thread starter Suzanne McTaggart
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Suzanne McTaggart

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I have read that passengers on the Bremen clearly saw the bodies of a woman and a baby in the sea after Titanic went down. The woman (presumably mother) was holding the baby - can anyone tell me if these bodies were recovered and if so whether they were identified? A similar scene was depicted in Cameron's movie, but i can't find any names on the recovered bodies list which could fit their identities.

Also, on the recovered bodies list, there are a number of examples where one member of a family has been found whilst others haven't (eg) Allison and Sage. Why is this? Were families separated in the panic of the sinking, and some had lifebelts and some hadn't? Or could the bodies have decomposed before the Mackay-Bennett arrived?

Any info would be appreciated
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Suzzanne, I'm afraid that there's just no way to know. The Breman was not equipped for this sort of thing and recovering corpses from a shipwreck isn't the sort of thing they would want to linger around for. It's not exactly the sort of thing that would have put the passengers minds at ease.

You might want to click on The List of Indentified Bodies and The List of Unidentified Bodies for more information.

>>Also, on the recovered bodies list, there are a number of examples where one member of a family has been found whilst others haven't (eg) Allison and Sage. Why is this? Were families separated in the panic of the sinking, and some had lifebelts and some hadn't? Or could the bodies have decomposed before the Mackay-Bennett arrived? <<

"C", all of the above and more. Once they were in the ocean, the bodies were very much at the mercy of wind, wave, currents, and any sort of sealife that might find them an appealing entree. Given that it's also extremely difficult to spot small objects in the ocean, it's entirely possible that some of the casualties may have simply been missed. Also, we have no way of knowing how many may have been trapped inside the ship when she went down. As Tom Pappas frequently points out, these numbers may have been quite high. While this is not knowable for certain, he may be right!
 

Dave Gittins

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To add a bit to Michael's comments, it should also be remembered that the sinking was a very violent affair. There are accounts of survivors who tried to stay with friends or relations, only to be quickly separated. (Olaus Abelseth, Jack Thayer, Colonel Gracie).

I rather agree with Tom Pappas on the likelihood that many went down inside the ship. Statistics on the bodies recovered back him up.
 
Mar 18, 2000
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To add to Dave's list: Lightoller & Gracie, who both were pulled down with the ship, but escaped to tell their tale. How many were sucked down, and *didn't* escape?

I definitely feel many either were sucked down, or were trapped inside the ship. How many? Hundreds? Possibly. More than a few? I'm positive. And a good number of them, were 3rd class.
 
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Suzanne McTaggart

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With the Bremen thing, i actually meant were the bodies of mother and child seen by the ship recovered by Mackay-Bennett? Or does anyone know who the mother and baby could have been? know the Bremen did not and would not stop to recover bodies for obvious reasons.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Unfortunately, there's just no way to know. Check the passenger lists and you'll find quite a few families traveling with infant children, and some of them didn't make it. Absent a close examination which wasn't practical at the time, we have no way of knowing if the Breman saw the same mother and child recovered by the Mackay-Bennett.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Suzanne, consider also that it would have been very difficult if not impossible to hold onto a baby throughout the violent events of the sinking - there are several accounts of passengers and crew who were holding onto small children and 'lost' them when they jumped or were thrown into the water. The dead mother with baby scene in Cameron's film is fiction - Lowe's testimony records that he saw only the bodies of men. The Bremen sighting of a woman actually holding a baby (and of another woman thought to be holding onto a large 'dog') was from a distance, and open to question. Even at close range, any object clutched to a woman's bosom might be thought to be a baby (like the famous incident involving Edith Russell's toy pig).
 
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Rachel Walker

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also remember that there were a lot of things added to the movie to make it more dramatic. the mother and baby were just put there to make people feel sad when they watched it. there were tons of mistakes he made like when Rose Dewitt Bukater said "six were saved from the water" and "only one boat came back". in truth, no one knows how many were saved from the water and more than one boat came back.
 
Nov 11, 2005
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I also thought that the young woman, thought to be Scandinavian, was Anna "Sigrid" Danbom (of Sweden) and her five-month-old son, Gilbert, who went down with Titanic, as did the father, Ernst, whose body was recovered.
 
Jul 26, 2009
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Maybe the baby was Gilbert Danbom and the mom was Anna Danbom. Anna was the sister of Mrs. Andersson. Gilbert was the cousin of Mrs. Andersson's 4 daughters and 1 son. They reached the boat deck. All of them died
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