Movie Dining room Chairs


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Ryan Landriault

Guest
As you have all seen the movie,
The first class dining room is beautifully re-created. I am creating the dining room and I would like to know the manufacturers of the green dining room chairs.If anyone knows about the chairs..please post!
 
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Ryan Landriault

Guest
The recreation of the first class dining room is for my plans of the New restaurant which I will be opening in Hamilton, Ontario. It is going under the design of the first class dining room. From the finest details of the carvings to the carpeting, from the windows to the window carvings, from the tables to the chairs, from the china to the silverware. I am not able to find anything on the chairs. So if anyone knows any info on the chairs, Please post!
 
Feb 4, 2007
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Denver, Colorado, United States
Hi Ryan, Sounds like a very exciting endeavor!

I believe the chairs for the film were made in Mexico, most likely by local artisans commissioned by Fox Studios, but but by whom exactly, I don't know.

I CAN tell you for sure that recent research and dives to Titanic have pretty much concluded that the real First Class Dining Saloon was most likely NOT carpeted as shown in the film. It was laid with linoleum tiles in a very rich blue and red pattern ~ tiles that have since been recovered and are now on display, in a faded state, as part of the touring Titanic Exhibition. The Reception Room was carpeted, but not the actual dining room.
 
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Ryan Landriault

Guest
Thank you very much!

I had no idea that the dining room was laid in linoleum tiles. I have always thought it was carpeted. This will certainly bring up the restaurant to detail.
 

Ben Lemmon

Member
Oct 9, 2009
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That's a pretty awesome idea. If I'm ever in Hamilton, Ontario after the restaurant is opened, I'll have to drop by. I'd bet you'll make a lot of money out of it. I know some avid Titanic fans would definitely drop by if they could. How pricey would you make the menu?

Brian Regan comes to mind now:
-Is there something wrong with your meal, sir?
-It's good. It just ain't a thousand dollars good.

(I always think of that when I hear about pricey restaurants, don't ask me why. Sorry for taking up your reading time)

However, I might have to make an exception this one time, being Titanic-themed and all. When are you planning on opening? (This question may be a bit far in advance)
 
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Ryan Landriault

Guest
Hello ben,

My restaurant is going to have the last meals that were made on Titanic on April 14,1912. I will not have the 12 course meals but I will have 8 course meals, 6 course meals and 4 course meals. My prices will vary from courses.

8 course meal - $89.50 for adults
$59.50 for seniors
$29.50 for children under 12

6 course meal - $65.50 for adults
$49.50 for seniors
$19.50 for children under 12

4 course meal - $52.50 for adults
- $32.50 for seniors
- $12.50 for children under 12

This restaurant is not recommended for children because of the styles of the food and a fair amount of alcoholic beverages.

The restaurant will have a memorial wall outside of the restaurant dedicated to the passengers and crew of the Titanic. As a said about the detail in the restaurant, I have already ordered the Wisteria Pattern china and White Star Line crystal, And I have ordered the carpeting for the restaurant as the pattern used in the 1997 film Titanic. I am also recreating the reception room with the whicker furniture and the palm styled plants and the same patterned carpeting. I have also designed the menus as how they were designed for the Titanic in 1912. The Uniforms for the stewards are in the White formal Tuxedo and using White Glove Service.

The restaurant is still going under planning but WILL BE BUILT by the end of the year 2010-2011.
If you are wondering "why so long" it is because I am willing to go under every detail used in the First Class Dining Room. I will assure you it will be like walking in as a First Class passenger ready to dine on that night of April 14, 1912.
 

Ben Lemmon

Member
Oct 9, 2009
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Hmmm . . . that sounds interesting. You should contact Inger Sheil, Michael Findlay, and Shelley Dziedzic for pictures and histories of some of the passengers. They are some of the foremost experts on certain passengers that I have come across on Encyclopedia Titanica during my research. They could probably provide you with some stuff, least of all information on passengers and crew.

Also, you could contact Phil Gowan on titanic-titanic.com. He might have some good stuff.

What may be neat would be to hold some sort of celebration or the like on April 15, 2012 in honor of those who lost their lives while on the Titanic. If stuff didn't go as planned, and the restaurant wouldn't be open as soon as 2010-2011, you could hold the opening celebration on that night. That would be neat. What would the customers be expected to wear? Formal tuxedo as well? Judging by the prices, this wouldn't be an everyday venture for most customers. What would be neat is if you could get enough money and resources to create a smoking room where those at the restaurant could "sip brandy and congratulate each other on being masters of the universe."
happy.gif


Oh, and by the way, I wasn't wondering "why so long." I know these things take time. I'm not that naive.
wink.gif
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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Ryan, if you want to be 100% authentic then children under 12 should be banned from the dining room unless their parents are prepared to pay the full price for their meals! And hopefully you will be charging the authentic $3 for a bottle of Pommeroy Naturel 1900.
smile.gif
. But on a more serious note, you have a slight dilemma in that if you reproduce the dining room and its crew with absolute authenticity then the great majority of your customers will think you've got some things wrong because they believe that James Cameron got everything right.
 
Nov 26, 2005
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The Titanic's dining saloon had tile instead of carpet? Are we sure? Could you by chance direct us to a source because this is the first I've heard about this very interesting discovery and I'd love to know more.

Thanks!
 
Feb 4, 2007
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Hi Matthew, Oh yes! As we know through photographic evidence and builder's info, the Olympic had patterned linoleum tile in her dining saloon ~ the only carpet she ever had in that room were a couple of larger area rugs installed sometime in the 1920's to cover the dance floor (also installed in the room in the 1920's) when the dance floor was not in use.

Likewise, the Titanic was built with linoleum tile in the same pattern. These blue and red tiles have been found on recent dives, and a few of them have been recovered for display by RMSTI. See these links here for more info:

http://www.history.com/snip
(scroll down towards the middle of the article above)

http://www.titanic-online.com/index.php4?page=359
(this tile has severely faded ~ most likely from the conservation process)

http://books.google.com/snip
(an excerpt from the book "Titanic: Destination Disaster")

http://titanic.marconigraph.com/cameron4.html
(scroll down to near the bottom of this article by Ken Marschall)

[Moderator's Note: Edited links due to width requirements. JDT]
 
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Ryan Landriault

Guest
I know the Titanic had the Linoleum tiles in the main dining saloon, but I would rather have carpeting throughout the restaurant. I am thinking also that it will be a FORMAL only wear because of the types of decor and the elegance in the restaurant. I am not sure if anyone wants to see someone with ripped jeans and offensive worded shirts eating in the restaurant while everyone else is dressed in formal attire.
 
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Ryan Landriault

Guest
I have also contacted Axminster carpets (the manufacturers of the Titanic Carpeting used) I have requested for the samples of the Dining Room Carpet used in the 1997 Film Titanic. This carpet will be placed throughout the reception room and the main dining Room.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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'Axminster' is a generic term for carpets of a particular type. The Axminster carpeting used in the real Titanic and in the film sets was made by a division of the Scottish company Stoddard, which sadly went into receivership a few years ago and their factory site is now a housing estate. But their archives have survived and I think are now at Glasgow University. See this thread:

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/discus/messages/5919/30032.html?1105618259
 
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Ryan Landriault

Guest
When I called them, they said they did supply carpeting and I didn't bother asking for the pattern pictures..i just assumed that it would be the same kind. So it isn't the same carpeting?
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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It's possible that Axminster Carpets acquired the rights to Stoddard's patterns and/or brand names as part of the sale of assets. But as you can see from the linked thread above, Stoddard's themselves could find no record of their original designs for the Titanic so Cameron was supplied with something suitably 'in period'. The Axminster Company could no doubt oblige with something very similar, and can certainly match the quality. Since we know that the real dining room had no carpet and the reception room had a carpet of unknown pattern, I wouldn't lose too much sleep over it. If any of your customers walking through the reception area complains that the real Titanic had a different carpet pattern and knows what it was, we'd love to know about it. :)
 

Ben Lemmon

Member
Oct 9, 2009
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quote:

I know the Titanic had the Linoleum tiles in the main dining saloon, but I would rather have carpeting throughout the restaurant.
It's his restaurant, Jason S. Times have changed. What was popular in 1912 is not so popular now. I think the choice to keep the carpeting is a good one. More people will be familiar with it, as it was in the movie. Also, the linoleum tile may not be as pleasing to the eye as carpeting usually is. Sometimes, you may have to sacrifice the smaller things in favor of aesthetics.​
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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I agree. I doubt that many of Ryan's diners will be looking for a totally authentic 1912 experience, any more than Cameron's audiences would have been happy to spend three hours watching a documentary about authentic 1912 characters and events. The film and the restaurant are commercial ventures, and customer satisfaction is the key to success.
 

Jim Kalafus

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Dec 3, 2000
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>and customer satisfaction is the key to success

Then eschew carpeting. It is not only inauthetic to the room, but also a nightmare in a restaurant setting. Unless one goes with the no-pile wipe and wash stuff you used to see in your grandmother's kitchen, misery ensues. Everything from the trip-hazard factor (the elderly, in particular, have trouble negotiating anything more plush than the granny's kitchen mat-style carpeting) to the high replacement rate due to staining, premature wear patterns (Particularly if you use the authentic chairs, which will rapidly eat circles into the carpet) and that odor that restaurant carpets acquire unless one steam washes them every night (Breading, like on cutlets, is particularly bad as it works its way deep into the pile, and grows rancid) all conspire to make wall-to-wall carpeting fairly rare. Add to that, that by nature of frequent spills wall-to-wall tends to grow mildew and the lawsuit-inviting black mold, and restaurants that DO have it are removing it.

>Sometimes, you may have to sacrifice the smaller things in favor of aesthetics.

Few things make a worse impression than worn, stained, slightly malodorous carpeting. Use runners, if you must, and a hard, easily cleaned surface, for the table areas. Restaurants, as you know, have a high mortality rate. The LAST thing you want to do, at the outset, is to pay someone an extra two hours wage EVERY NIGHT to properly steam clean the carpeting. That is sixty unnecessary hours each month.

The restaurant sounds like a beautiful idea, and best of luck to you in the venture.
 

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