Movie vs Actual


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Rhonda Serafini

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I apologize for being "Titanically Challenged" but I was wondering about the reality of some of the parts of the movie. I am sure that many others have asked these questions, so please be patient with me. How accurate is Jack and Rose's 'story' to the truth? Did Jack really win his tickets in a hand of cards from a couple of Swedes?
 

Beth Barber

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Jun 7, 2001
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Hi Rhonda - The Story of Jack and Rose in James Camerons 1997 itanic movie is fictional. Those characters weren't real people who were really on the Titanic. Same goes for Roses mother and fiancee Cal. This includes Cals manservant too. Hope this helps - Beth
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welcome to the board!
 
Jan 31, 2001
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Hello Rhonda,

We have all been "Titanically Challenged" at one time or another, so your questions are no problem. This message board is here so you can learn, no matter how much you know about the story.

Jack Dawson and Rose DeWitt Bukater were purely fictional. The entire love triangle was made-up for the film.

The following characters shown in the film were fictional:

Rose DeWitt Bukater
Jack Dawson
Cal Hockley
Spicer Lovejoy
Ruth DeWitt Bukater
Trudy Bolt
Fabrizio
Tommy Ryan

There was a trimmer on the Titanic named Joseph Dawson. On his gravestone, he is marked as "J. Dawson", which is how the fictional Jack signed his name in the film. For awhile, fans of the film were placing flowers and other mementos on the grave because they thought it was the Jack Dawson character! For more information on this "real-life Jack Dawson", check out these links:

"The Real Jack Dawson" research article by Senan Molony:

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/articles/dawson_molony.shtml

The biography of Joseph Dawson:

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/bio/c/e/dawson_j.shtml


Cheers,
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-B.W.
 
Jan 31, 2001
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Beth,

Looks like we hit this one at about the same time!

Rhonda,

I have no clue why those links aren't highlighted and clickable.


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 
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Rhonda Serafini

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Thanks for your insights. Too bad about Jack and Rose. It would have made a great true story! I loved the movie but I will never watch it again. It was just too sad. I have never cried so much at a movie in all of my 33 years! I actually had a swollen face, stuffed up nose and a terrible headache after watching it.

-Rhonda
 
Jan 31, 2001
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Michael,

Apparently it wasn't checked when I made that last post; however, that is the first time it hasn't been. Oh well, it is now, so all is good!


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Glad to hear it Brandon. It's easy enough to miss. I'm not being sarcastic either. It was months befor I even noticed it was there. (That or I'm getting a head start on my senior moments!)
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Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Jan 31, 2001
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I never paid any attention to it really, either. Senior moments? You!? Nah! Unless having 4,000 posts makes you old!
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Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 

Erik Wood

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Having 4000 posts makes you something, but I don't know if old is what I would call it.

Perhaps...nah, better be nice.

Erik
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Gabby bloke this Mike Standart, isn't he? (Arrggg, there I go, talking to myself again! Gotta get back on my meds!)
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And getting back on topic, yes, as the other's noted, the movie was heavily fictionalised, but I'm not averse to giving credit where it's due. The sets were outstanding, and nobody has ever done a better job of re-creating the ship herself.

While a lot of history took it in the shorts, I think Cameron was spot on when he got into the emotional impact and the horror of the actual event. Especially that scene where the ship was gone and 1500 screaming and terrified people found themselves fighting for their lives in the freezing waters of the North Atlantic. A battle that most would ultimately lose! I'll never forget that scene, nor will I forget the tear streaked faces of the characters on the Akademik Keldish as the listened to the end of Rose's story.

The real tragedy of the Titanic were the deaths that need not have happened, and the shambles it made of the lives of those left behind who had to pick up the peices and carry on. If there was a message in the flick at all, this was it, and Cameron got it!

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Jan 31, 2001
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Yes, despite the fiction, it was good. I loved the realism of the sets, and I even liked some of the fictional characters; mainly Mr. Hockley and his manservant, Mr. Lovejoy. Basically, I liked Cameron's villians!

I remember the scene you're talking about. Rose and Jack are fighting for their lives in the water, and the camera pulls back and reveals what appears to be miles of freezing swimmers in the middle of nowhere. It was indeed gripping.

I will never forget the film's ending, where Rose returns to the decaying hull, which suddenly takes on its original beauty. I thought it was the perfect ending to the film.


Cheers,
happy.gif


-B.W.
 

Alan Hustak

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Mar 18, 2000
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Originally, as I understand it, Cameron's intention was to have a first class male (Jack Dawson) fall in love with a third class female, (Rose), but he changed his story shortly before shooting the film.
 
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Rhonda Serafini

Guest
Oh, the realism was definitely the most painful part! Seeing the frozen mother and tiny baby in her arms killed me. And also the part of the mother still in the ship; she knew she wasn't getting out, so she gathered her children and read to them as the water rose about them. AAAGH I hate to think of it even this long after seeing the movie! :eek:(
 

paul daley

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Jul 6, 2002
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what a film, although major flaws,
"flying" could never have happened as the forecastle deck is for crew only, no passengers allowed.
also the whistle rose blows, put something metal in your freezer for 20 mins, then onto your lips, unspeakable, yes.
it made a mockery of the lookouts, they werent pervs.
the way jack moves freely around the decks, all areas, i'm surprised he never entered the bridge and tried to steer the ship round the berg.
the film showed some harsh realities though, baby frozen, passengers trapped below decks. credit where its due though, superb film.
 
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Tim Gillis

Guest
Jack was one real nutcase.

Anyway, another flaw in the movie was the echoes when Lowe went back for survivors. Out in the middle of the Atlantic there was nothing for the sound waves to bounce off!
 

Kyrila Scully

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Apr 15, 2001
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Rhonda, you might be interested in knowing the true story of Kate Phillips, a 19-year-old store clerk, who ran off with her 40-year-old boss, Henry Samuel Morley. They boarded the Titanic as "Mr. and Mrs. Marshall, booked as Second Class Passengers. Planning to start a new life in America with Kate, Mr. Morley sold his half of three shops to his brother, made sure his wife and daughter would have a comfortable income, then purchased an exquisite emerald-cut sapphire pendant surrounded by eighteen diamonds, and hanging from a gold chain by a lavalier with a diamond on it. Kate wore it to dinner in the Second Class Dining Room every night, an austentation which created quite a stir among their fellow passengers. Alas, when the ship was foundering, Sam put his mistress on a lifeboat and stood back with the other men. She left the ship carrying the leather pouch with their steamer trunk keys and the sapphire necklace. And unbeknownst to both of them, she also carried from the Titanic his unborn child, conceived during the maiden voyage.
Having no relatives or friends in America, Kate was shipped back to England and forced to face up to the gossip regarding her affair with Sam. However it soon became apparent that Kate was pregnant with Sam's child and Kate moved away rather than live in shame and embarrassment. The combination of what was probably Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome and Post-Partum Depression, Kate's mental health spiraled downward. Her daughter, Ellen Mary Phillips was born on January 13th, 1913, and raised by her grandparents for the most part. When Kate married, she claimed her child (who thought they were sisters), but was not very good at being a mother. Ellen lived much like Cinderella, often beaten and locked away in a dark room, never allowed to play with other children. Kate became increasingly depressed and attempted suicide a few times. She was eventually placed in an asylum, except for a short time when she lived with Ellen (by then an adult and married to a Mr. Walker). But Kate disappeared and Ellen lost touch. It was several months after the event that Ellen learned her mother had passed away. She then began a quest to learn about her biological father, and finally got to see a picture of him. She's still trying to have his name put on her birth certificate as her father.

I hope you enjoyed the story.
Kyrila
 
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