Mr. Andrews' info

M

Max Nikulin

Guest
Hi all!

Here's my positiion about Thomas Andrews was
carring ship's plan (blueprint) to the bridge to show real damage .

That's not true -I think as well as it's not known how many people knew real damage of the Titanic.

As you might know Thomas Andrews was sittin' in his cabin and he hardly felt the collision.Capn.
Smith ordered to tell Mr Andrews to come to the bridge.So he DIDN'T take any scrolls and went
to the bridge.Then Smith,Wilde,Andrews and ship's
carpenter went to make the inspection below.

The words "Titanic will founder" were said on their way back up.-As Thomas Andrews spoke he mentioned some periods in sinking such as
"half an hour " "an hour" etc. some heard it and
as they listened perhaps parts of phrases
such as "half an hour" and "will founder" they
misinterpreted it- as in Hemming's testimony:

...Just as he went, the boatswain came, and he says, "Turn out, you fellows," he says; "you haven't half an hour to live." He said: "That is from Mr. Andrews." He said: "Keep it to yourselves, and let no one know."...

So seems to me boatswain heard some part of talk.

Anyway on the bridge there weren't such meetings which included Murdoch ,Ismay etc. as in Camerons' Titanic.
Difficult to say wether Murdoch or Lightoller knew
all the truth.But perhaps they could- fully or
part of it but I think not from Mr Andrews.

Talking about Pitman ,Boxhall,Lowe and Moody they
could only guess it for themself.

Mr Wilde acted some way different from Mr Murdoch
or Mr Lightoller.

I'll continue this research in my future posts.

All the best!

Max Nikulin
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Very late to this reply, I wanted to add my £0.02. It is my brief opinion that Ismay was at least told at some point about the ship's fate on the bridge as he was so 'panicky' telling Pitman to hurry and later at boat 5 giving orders to lower it quickly. I'd say Murdoch knew as was on the bridge, from what Pitman said of Murdoch's conversation at boat 5; it struck him that Murdoch thought the ship would sink.

I have not an opinion about Wilde as he seemed so reluctant regarding lowering the boats.
 
J

Jordan Wyatt McGlothlin

Guest
Hello,

Small did order them back below assumingly to the boilers i hope that helped you.

--J.M.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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<FONT COLOR="ff0000">Small did order them back below assumingly to the boilers i hope that helped you.

I am sorry, I don't understand.
 
Jan 5, 2001
2,299
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<FONT COLOR="ff0000">Small did order them back below assumingly to the boilers i hope that helped you.

I am sorry, I don't understand.
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Hello,

Mr. McGlothlin lives directly across the road from me, and he has only begun his research in the Titanic. I am sorry for the misunderstanding. Personally, I don't know what he was thinking about putting Small here, as Mr. Small was never mentioned on this discussion. I do recall Jordan researching Small awhile back. I'll ask him personally what he meant today, because I haven't a clue!

-B.W.
 
J

Jordan Wyatt McGlothlin

Guest
Hello Everyone,

I am so sorry about the misunderstanding I must have clicked on the wrong link. Please accept my apologie.


-J.M.
 
Jul 10, 2005
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Has anyone ever seen Thomas Andrews notebook???
I was reading a copy of it from James Cameron's Explorer CD Rom. I wrote down some interesting information on the phone system that was being discussed sometime ago..I found it quite interesting.
That man was impeccable for detail!

Beverly
 

Charmaine Sia

Member
Nov 25, 2001
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>I'd say Murdoch knew as was on the bridge, from what Pitman said of Murdoch's conversation at boat 5; it struck him that Murdoch thought the ship would sink.

This is pure speculation from my part, because I really don't know exactly how possible it is to tell the situation, but it seems to me that if Murdoch was the officer on watch and did his best, he would have known, or at least guessed the extent of damage done.

Regards,
Charmaine
 

George Behe

Member
Dec 11, 1999
1,265
0
0
Hi, Logan!

IMO, there's no real evidence that Andrews was summoned by *anyone.* The evidence I've uncovered suggests that Andrews went investigating on his own and met up with Captain Smith below decks by accident.

All my best,

George
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Charmaine,

<FONT COLOR="ff0000">This is pure speculation from my part, because I really don't know exactly how possible it is to tell the situation, but it seems to me that if Murdoch was the officer on watch and did his best, he would have known, or at least guessed the extent of damage done.

Yes, but there's a difference in knowing about severe damage and enough damage to sink the ship; I agree with you, but also believe he was on the bridge with Andrews.

<FONT COLOR="119911">The evidence I've uncovered suggests that Andrews went investigating on his own and met up with Captain Smith below decks by accident

Could you give the quotes please? I've done a comparison of testimony from everyone involved about the damage inspection, tour, etc. and will post that later.

Best,

Mark.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi George, Logan, Charmaine!

When thinking out the problem and how to portray the damage inspection, I compiled various relevent testimonies dealing with the subject. Then going through them I drew up a summary of each person's testimony and a conclusion of what happened during and after the damage inspection. I cannot find the conclusion at the moment, but here's my testimony compilation:

Best regards,

Mark.

JOSEPH THOMAS WHEAT, ASSISTANT SECOND STEWARD
10876. At the time when the accident happened were you in your bunk? - No, just about to turn in.
10877. You were just going to turn in? - Yes.
10878. Did you hear the collision? - Yes, I heard a noise.
10879. As you judged it at, the time, what did you think it was? - Well, I thought she had cast one of her propeller blades. It sounded to me like that.
10880. Have you been on a ship where that has happened? - Yes.
10881. And you thought it was that? - Yes, I thought it was the same thing.
10882. We must find out where your room was? - On F deck down by the Turkish bath.
10883. Is it the port or starboard side? - Port side.
10884. I see "Turkish Bath Attendants" and I see "Second Steward" marked. Those are on the side of the ship? - Yes, on the outside.
10885. Then I see on the inside, "Two assistant second stewards"? - Yes.
10886. That is your room? - Yes.
10887. You had a mate in your room with you? - Yes.
10888. Was be in the room with you at the time? - Yes, he was in his bunk.
10889. You roused him, I think, did you not? - Yes.
10890. Did he get up and find out what was the matter? - Yes. I asked him if he had heard any noise, and he said "No."
10891. What deck did you go to? - To E deck.
10892. That would be the deck immediately above you? - Yes.
10893. And what did you learn when you got to E deck? - Well, I met the night watchman. I think his name was Johnson. He told she was making water badly forward.
10894. Was that man Johnson saved? - Yes.
10895. I think we have had him here as a witness; he is a Scotsman, is he not? - Yes.
10896. You met Johnson? - Yes.
10897. And he told you she was making water forward? - Yes.
10898. Did you go forward yourself? - Yes, I went forward myself.
10899. On the E deck? - Yes, forward on E deck.
10900. And what did you find when you went forward on the E deck? - I went down to the Post Office room, which is down on G. You will find a stairway leading from E down to the Post Office and baggage room.
10901. I want to trace this because I understand this is only a few minutes after the accident? - Ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.
10902. You were on E deck. You go forward? - Yes.
10903. And you go down as low as G deck? - Yes.
10904. Now will you tell me again which is the stairway by which you go down from E deck? - The first stairway leads down to the squash racquet court and then continues on down to the Post Office and baggage room.
10905. Is the stairway immediately aft of the squash racquet court? - No, forward of the squash racquet court.
10906. I thought forward of the squash racquet court was a bunker head? - When you go down to the squash racquet court you turn to the right to got to the squash racquet court.
10907. Is it the stairway which, when you got to G deck brings you close to the Post Office? - Yes
10908. You went down that stairway? - Yes.
10909. And you think it was about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after you had felt the collision? - About that, I should think.
10910. Now will you tell us what you found when you got down to G deck? - I saw the mail men dragging bags of mail up, which I took to be the registered mail. The water was already on that deck.
10911. It was already on G deck? - Yes
10912. Did you get down to the actual level of G deck? - Yes, I was on G deck.
10913. You were standing there? - Yes.
10914. Was there water where you were standing? - No, it was just snaking up the stairs then, just making G deck.
10915. You mean coming up from below, the Orlop deck, to G? - Yes.
10916. Is there a stairway which goes down again from G deck to the below? - Yes, but that is behind those stairs. You turn round again to get down the stairs.
10917. I want you to tell us where you saw the water coming up as you say just making G deck? - It was almost flush with G deck when I got on it.
10918. Do you mean where this stairway is which leads down? - Yes.

JAMES JOHNSON, NIGHT WATCHMAN
3353. The first class dining saloon? - Yes.
3354. Was it your job to go on every night? - Yes.
3355. Did you go on the night of the accident? - I went on at 11 o'clock.
3356. You simply had to go into the saloon and wait? - Well, no. Everyone gets a watch and at 12 o'clock when the bedroom stewards turn over we take their watch. There is a bedroom steward and a night watchman on each deck, and all the third class and all the second class reported to me each night when they came on watch.
3357. Now what you had to do was simply to stay in the saloon as I understand? - No, I took E - what they call the saloon - the reception room and the pantry, on.
3358. Where were you when the accident happened? - About the amidships saloon, I should think. We were all talking a few chairs up. It would be about the third or fourth table up.
3359. In that big saloon? - Yes.
3360. Did you feel the shock? - I did not feel much because we thought she had lost her wheel or something, and somebody passed the remark, "Another Belfast trip."
3361. Another what? - To go back to Belfast it meant
3362. Do you belong to Belfast? - I belong to Scotland.
3363. Did you do anything in consequence of feeling a shock? - I had a look round first and then I asked a man when he came up for some hot water, "Do you mind going down to the engine room and have a look." He went down and came back and said, "I think it is a bit hot" - that is a racing phrase. He meant it was a bit serious.
3364. Do you know who that was? - I have found out afterwards, but I did not know then. I only knew our own division. I never knew anyone but those in our own stewards' department.
3365. He was a greaser, was he not? - I think he was.
3366. You do not know his name? - I think he might have been a man they called White. I have found out, but I do not know whether it is right or not.
3367. Did you do anything after that? - Yes; I went down and walked along the saloon and saw Mr. Andrews come down and go down to the engine room, and then I saw the Captain directly following him, and then I followed Mr. Andrews after he came up from the engine room.
3368. Now tell me who is Mr. Andrews? - Well, one of the best known among our division, because he did anything for us when we asked him.
3369. But who is he? - He is one of the builders.
3370. He is the representative of the builders? Yes.
3371. And he and the Captain came through? - No, he came three of four minutes before the Captain.
3372. Through the saloon you were in? - He had to come down through the stairs to get down to the engine-room to got on to E deck; he had to go down through those stairs.
3373. And then he gets into the alleyway and got to the engine-room? - Just turn to the left and he is in it.
3374. Did he go in that direction? I do not know. I know he went down.
3375. Did the Captain go down after him? - Directly after.
3376. Did you stay where you were? - No; I put four oranges into my pocket. I might have done it after, but I think I did it then.
3377. Did you follow the captain or stay where you were? - No; I waited a minute and followed Mr. Andrews.
3378. What happened next? - Mr. Andrews went through the saloon after this man came and told me it was a bit thick. I followed Mr. Andrews and went down to E deck to see if Duscheck was there. He was down there on watch in that deck. I went down to E deck and saw Mr. Andrews go down by the baggage room or mail room. One door goes down and the other does not.
3379. It is lower down still? - Yes.
3380. Is that the same part of the ship? Are you still talking of the same part of the ship? - It is a little a bit farther forward, past the reception room.
3381. Is that it? (pointing on the plan) - Give it another 50 yards.
3382. Was it as far as the squash racket? - Opposite the squash racket.
3383. That is a good way forward, is it not? - Yes.
3384. The baggage room is there, is it? - Well, they were handling mails or something; when I looked there was water there then.
3385. In the baggage room? - Yes, it is on F deck, underneath E.
3386. The squash racket is on two decks, is it not? - I do not think so.
3387. Does not that go up through two decks? - No.
3388. Surely it is higher? - You are asking me a question and I am answering you. I say it was F deck. You have to down from E to it.
3389. It is on F deck, and is it not on G deck too? - No.
3390. Now where is the first-class baggage? It is on G deck, the baggage room? - No, I do not think so. I never went further than that, and I think it was in that.
3391. Will you understand this if I show you the plan.
3392. (Sir Robert Finlay.) It is on G deck.
The Witness: Well, it is a little bit further down. The baggage room was not on G deck.
3393. (Mr. Rowlatt.) Is it not? - The mail room is on E, F.
3394. The baggage room and mail room are on this deck. Come and look at the plan and then we shall not quarrel. We had better understand it once for all.
The witness examined the plan with the learned Counsel.
The Commissioner: Which deck is it?
Mr. Rowlatt: G.
The Commissioner: Very well.
3395. You looked into the baggage room? - No, I looked down the stairs.
3396. You saw into it, and saw there was water there? - Yes.
3397. How long should you say after the shock was it that you saw water in the baggage room? - I went down to call the second steward, Mr. Dodd. I took plenty of time and it must have been a good twenty-five minutes after I met Mr. Wheat coming up, and he said, "What is it"? I think it is a bit serious."
MRS. ANNIE ROBINSON, STEWARDESS
13272. You were a First Class Stewardess on the "Titanic," were you not? - Yes.
13273. And at the time the ship struck the iceberg I think you were in bed? - I was.
13274. Did you get up and dress? - I did.
13275. And did you afterwards go in the direction of the mail room? - Yes.
13276. What deck were you on? - E deck.
13277. When you got to the top of the stairs which lead down to the mail room what did you see? - I saw two mail-bags and a man's Gladstone bag, and on looking down the staircase I saw water within six steps of coming on to E deck.
13278. That would mean that it had gone up to the top of the mail room and into the compartment above that? - Certainly.
13279. Are the stairs you are speaking of the ones by the side of the squash rackets court? - Yes.
The Commissioner: I would like to follow this. I see the mail room on the plan.
Mr. Raymond Asquith: I think I can point it out to you, my Lord.
The Solicitor-General: Your Lordship will see a that this confirms the theory of Wheat about the water rising to the top of E deck.
Mr. Raymond Asquith: That is the mail room; above that is the post office, and above that is the squash rackets court. It was at the stairs there that the water was seen; the witness says that the water came to within six steps of the top of those stairs (pointing on the cartoon).
13280. (The Commissioner - To the Witness.) About what time was this? - About half an hour after she struck.
13281. After the collision? - After the collision about half an hour.
13282. (Mr. Raymond Asquith.) Did you see the Captain and Mr. Andrews about this time? - The mail man passed along first and he returned with Mr. McElroy and the Captain and they went in the direction of the mail room, but that was before.
13283. It was seeing the Captain and Mr. Andrews going to the mail room that made you go there? - I followed after they had come back.
The Commissioner: Are we to understand that at this time the mail room was covered with water?
13284. (Mr. Raymond Asquith.) Yes, and not only the mail room but the storey immediately above it. (To the Witness.) When you saw the water there I suppose you realised that things were rather serious? - I did.
13285. Did you go and look after your ladies? - I did.
13286. How many ladies were under your charge? - Seven ladies and one maid and a governess.
13387. Did you see other stewardesses doing the same thing, looking after their passengers? - The stewardess on my deck was doing exactly the same thing.
13288. Did you then go upstairs on to A deck? - I had to call a stewardess I had met on the boat on A deck.
13289. Were you told by a steward there to put on your coat and lifebelt? - Mr. Andrews told me first.
13290. Did Mr. Andrews tell you anything else? - Yes. Mr. Andrews told me to put my lifebelt on after I had been on E deck.
13291. Did he say something to you about blankets? - We had already got the blankets and the lifebelts out of the rooms at the foot of the staircase. Mr. Andrews said to me, "put your lifebelt on and walk about and let the passengers see you." I said to him, "It looks rather mean," and he said, "No, put it on," and then after he said to me, "If you value your life put your belt on."
13292. Did you put your belt on and walk about in it? - I did.
13293. Did he say anything to you about Mr. Ismay? - No, Mr. Ismay's name was never mentioned in my hearing.
13294. So far as you know were all the ladies on E deck warned by the stewardesses whose business it was to look after them? - Yes, and they were all saved, too.
13295. You told us you were responsible for seven or eight ladies; were they all saved? - They were.
13296. Eventually you were put into boat number 11? - Yes.
The Solicitor-General: That is the one the last witness Wheat referred to.
13297. (Mr. Raymond Asquith - To the Witness.) I will not ask you about what happened in the boat, but there is one thing I should have asked you about what happened before; did you see the carpenter? - I did; he was the first man I saw. He came along when I was looking down at the water, and he had the lead line in his hand.
13298. Had he taken a sounding do you know? - I could not tell you that.
13299. Did he say anything to you? - No, the man looked absolutely bewildered, distracted. He did not speak.
13300. You think he looked alarmed? - He certainly was.
13301. When your boat left the ship was the band still playing? - Yes.
LAMP TRIMMER SAMUEL HEMMING
Lamp Trimmer Samuel Hemming testified. After the collision, he had awoke and investigated a loud hissing noise from the forepeak tank. Then Chief Officer Wilde had come along. Both had had a brief discussion before Wilde headed to the bridge.
‘What is that, Hemming?’ Wilde had asked.
‘The air is escaping from the forepeak tank,’ he had explained. ‘She is making water in the forepeak tank, but the storeroom is quite dry.’
‘All right,’ Wilde had replied.
ABLE SEAMAN FRANK OLIVER EVANS
Able Seaman Evans testified that soon after the collision, ‘the Fifth or Sixth Officer’ had spoke to him after Evans had ‘went up the ladder there’ to the fore well deck. (About five or ten minutes after collision?). Fourth Officer Boxhall was more likely to have spoke to him though, from previous testimony.
‘Go down and find the Carpenter and sound all the wells forward, and report to the bridge,’ he had been ordered. He had gone down the Engineers’ alleyway and met the Boatswain.
‘Who are you looking for?’ he had been asked.
‘The Carpenter.’
‘He has gone up.’
‘What is the matter, then?’
‘I do not know. I think we have struck an iceberg.’
He had soon afterwards seen water rising in the forward hatch, rising the tarpaulin.
CHARLES LIGHTOLLER, SECOND OFFICER
14674. Had you at any time any information as to the extent to which water had come in the "Titanic"? - Yes.
14675. When? - When the Port Officer reported to me in my room, and also when I asked the Carpenter whether No. 6 stokehold were dry. On the first occasion the Fourth Officer informed me the water was up to F deck. He has explained since he meant G deck - and the Carpenter informed me that No. 6 stokehold was dry. (No. 6 stokehold — boiler room number 4, aft part.)
JOSEPH GROVES BOXHALL, FOURTH OFFICER
15356. Did the Captain and the First Officer go to the starboard side of the bridge to see if they could see the iceberg? - Yes.
15357. Did you see it yourself? - I was not too sure of seeing it. I had just came out of the light, and my eves were not accustomed to the darkness.
15358. What did you do next - did you leave the deck? - Yes, I went down forward, down into the third-class accommodation., right forward on to the lowest deck of all with passenger accommodation, and walked along these looking for damage.
15359. That would be F deck, would it not? - Yes, F deck. I walked along there for a little distance just about where I thought she had struck.
15360. Did you find any signs of damage? - No, I did not.
The Commissioner: What deck is it?
Mr. Raymond Asquith: F deck, he says.
15381. (The Commissioner.) You say it is F deck?
The Witness: I am not quite sure, my Lord, but it was the lowest deck I could get to without going into the cargo space.
Mr. Raymond Asquith: The lowest deck on which there is passenger accommodation, he said.
The Commissioner: Is not that G?
Mr. Raymond Asquith: Yes, my Lord, I think it must be G.
The Commissioner: It is pointed out that he could not get along G deck, because there is no door in the bulkhead, and therefore it cannot have been G deck.
15362. (Mr. Raymond Asquith.) How did you get down to the lowest of these decks which you went to? - Through a staircase under the port side of the forecastle head which takes me down into D deck, and then walked along aft along D deck to just underneath the bridge, and down the staircase there on the port side, and then I went down on E deck near E deck doors, the working alleyway; and then you cross over to the starboard side of E deck and go down another accommodation staircase on to F deck. I am not sure whether I went lower. Anyhow, I went as low as I could possibly get.
15363. (The Commissioner - To the Witness.) Just come round here? - Yes, my Lord. (The Witness explained plane to the Commissioner.)
The Commissioner: He appears to have got to F deck. His first statement was right.
15364. (Mr. Raymond Asquith.) Did you then go up again through the other decks as far as C deck? - I came up the same way as I went down.
15365. Without noticing any damage? - I did not see any damage whatever.
15366. When you got to C deck did you see some ice there on the deck? - Yes, I took a piece of ice out of a man’s hand, a small piece about as large as a small basin, I suppose; very small, anyhow; about that size (describing.) He was going down again to the passenger accommodation, and I took it from him and walked across the deck to see where he got it. I found just a little ice in the well deck covering a space of about three or four feet from the bulwarks right along the well deck, small stuff.
15367. Did you then go and report to the Captain? - I went on to the bridge and reported to the Captain and First Officer that I had seen no damage whatever.
15368. Did the Captain then tell you to find the carpenter? - Yes, I think we stayed on the bridge just for a moment or two, probably a couple of minutes, and then he told me to find the carpenter and tell him to sound the ship forward.
15369. Did you find the carpenter? - I met the carpenter I think it would be on the ladder leading from the bridge down to A deck, and he wanted to know where the Captain was. I told him he was on the bridge.
15370. Did the carpenter tell you anything about there being water? - Yes, he did; he said the ship was making water fast, and he passed it on to the bridge.
15371. What did you do? - I continued with the intention of finding out where the water was coming in, and I met one of the mail clerks, a man of the name of Smith.
15372. Did he say something? - He also asked for the Captain, and said the mail hold was filling. I told him where he could find the Captain and I went down to the mail room. I went down the same way as I did when 1 visited the third-class accommodation previously. I went down as far as E deck and went to this starboard alley-way on E deck and the watertight door stopped me getting through.
15373. The watertight door on E deck was closed? - Yes. Then I crossed over and went into the working alleyway and so into the mail-room.
15374. What did you find in the mail-room? - I went down in the mail-room and found the water was within a couple of feet of G deck, the deck I was standing on.
15375. The mail-room is between the Orlop deck and G deck? - Yes, that is the usual hold.
15376. Was the water rising or stationary? - It was rising rapidly up the ladder and I could hear it rushing in.
15377. Did you go back and report that to the Captain on the bridge? - I stayed there just for a minute or two and had a look. I saw mail-bags floating around on deck. I saw it was no use trying to get them out so I went back again to the bridge. I met the Second steward, Mr. Dodds, on my way to the bridge - as a matter of fact in the saloon companion way - and he asked me about sending men down below for those mails. I said “You had better wait till I go to the bridge and find what we can do.” I went to the bridge and reported to the Captain.
15378. We have been told that at some time you called the other officers; both Mr. Lightoller and Mr. Pitman said you called them? - I did. That was after I reported to the Captain about the mail-room.
15379. Could you form any opinion as to how long that was after the impact? - No, but as near as I could judge; I have tried to place the time for it, and the nearest I can get to it as approximately 20 minutes to half an hour.
15380. I think those are the times which as given by Mr. Pitman amid Mr. Lightoller. After calling those officers did you go on to the bridge again? - Yes, I think I went towards the bridge, I am not sure whether it was then that I heard the order given to clear the boats or unlace the covers. I might have been on the bridge for a few minutes and then heard this order given.
 

George Behe

Member
Dec 11, 1999
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Hi, Mark!

Your inquiry excerpts include part of the info I used in tracing Smith's and Andrews' post-collision movements; however, Smith does not seem to have actually encountered Andrews in person before the mail room encounter, since another witness deeper inside the ship said that Smith was apparently headed for Joseph Bell's cabin (instead of the engine room) and that Smith returned from that area alone. Even after the Smith/Andrews mail room encounter, though, it's clear that Andrews *still* did not realize the full extent of the damage that Titanic had sustained; he continued his inspection alone and only later informed Smith that there was no hope.

I've temporarily misplaced the floppy disk which contains my detailed analysis of Smith's and Andrews' post-collision movements, but my complete account (with sources) was published in Susanne Stormer's book, "Titanic: Eine Katastrophe zwischen Kitsch, Kult und Legende" (2000).

All my best,

George
 

Logan Geen

Member
Dec 2, 2001
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Thanks guys-I've often wondered exactly how the damage inspection went. That Andrews needed to be called out was mentioned by Eaton/Haas and Walter Lord. But it does seem more likely that he ventured forth on his own. By the way, George, glad to meet you!
 

George Behe

Member
Dec 11, 1999
1,265
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Hi, Logan!

Thanks very much -- it's a pleasure to meet you as well! I've been enjoying your postings, and I'm sure you're going to enjoy yourself here on ET.

Take care, old chap.

All my best,

George
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Hi George,

<FONT COLOR="ff0000">I've temporarily misplaced the floppy disk which contains my detailed analysis of Smith's and Andrews' post-collision movements, but my complete account (with sources) was published in Susanne Stormer's book, "Titanic: Eine Katastrophe zwischen Kitsch, Kult und Legende" (2000).

Is that book available in English? My German is rusty, but I guess there are both languages?

<FONT COLOR="ff0000">Even after the Smith/Andrews mail room encounter, though, it's clear that Andrews *still* did not realize the full extent of the damage that Titanic had sustained; he continued his inspection alone and only later informed Smith that there was no hope.

May I ask your reasoning specifically? Robinson says herself:
[hr]
Quote:

13283. It was seeing the Captain and Mr. Andrews going to the mail room that made you go there? - I followed after they had come back.
The Commissioner: Are we to understand that at this time the mail room was covered with water?
13284. (Mr. Raymond Asquith.) Yes, and not only the mail room but the storey immediately above it. (To the Witness.) When you saw the water there I suppose you realised that things were rather serious? - I did.
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He certainly seems to have been aware of flooding in this hold specifically, but I take it that your understanding is that he did not realise the extent in other areas of the bow at this point?

Steward Wheat said that shortly after the collision:

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Quote:

10893. And what did you learn when you got to E deck? - Well, I met the night watchman. I think his name was Johnson. He told she was making water badly forward.
[hr]​

There's also Hemming's account -- I think it may have been -- that tells of Andrews being aware of the flooding in the forward holds; but I do not believe the 'half hour to live' part of the story. From memory, I don't recall the timing of this, either.

It's a pity I am away from my analysis and my script as I could have been able to give a much more comprehensive thought on the damage inspection.

Best regards,

Mark.